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Full text of "Methodism in Portland : and a page of church history"

METHODISM IN PORTLAND 




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METHODISM 



IN PORTLAND 



AND 



A PAGE OF CHURCH HISTORY 



BY 



ROBERT PEARCE 



CHARLES H. KELLY 
CASTLE ST., CITY RD. ; AND 26, PATERNOSTER ROW, E.C. 

1898 



PREFACE 



Some few years ago an attempt was made to 
establish a monthly magazine in connection with 
the Wesleyan Church at Portland, which it was 
hoped would have been of service to the Circuit. 
Owing to the difficulty of making it a financial 
success, it was only possible to continue its publi- 
cation for a few months. During its existence it 
contained one or two articles on the Introduction 
of Methodism into Portland, and these served to 
arouse in the minds of the Methodists of the island 
an interest in the approaching centenary of the 
event — the year 1891. 

In good time the question of its being suitably 
celebrated was brought before the Circuit Quarterly 



vi PREFACE 

Meeting, and the friends of the Fortune's Well 
branch of the Circuit announced their inten- 
tion to celebrate the event by building a new 
chapel. 

It was also arranged to hold special services, and 
on Sunday, October 25 th, the Eev. John M'Kenny 
and the Eev. Josiah Jutsum preached in the 
Fortune's Well and Easton Chapels. 

On the following Monday evening a public 
meeting was held in the chapel at Fortune's Well, 
when Mr. Christopher Gibbs, the oldest local 
preacher on the Circuit plan, took the chair. 
Addresses were given by the Circuit ministers and 
others. Strange to say, however, no reference 
whatever was made by any speaker to the all- 
important event which was being celebrated, and 
the name of Brackenbury was never mentioned. 

A little later in the year, the enthusiasm of the 
friends at Easton found expression in a week of 
special services held in the Easton Chapel, of 
which the details are given in the following copy 
of the handbills which announced them : — 



PREFACE vii 

SPECIAL SERVICES IN THE EASTON WESLEYAN 

CHAPEL, 

to Commemorate the Establishment of Methodism 

in Portland 100 Years Ago. 



On Sunday, December 13th, 
The Kev. CHARLES SYMES 

Will Preach Morning and Evening, and give an Address in 

the Afternoon to the Sunda} 7 - Schools. 

All Friends are cordially invited to attend. 

Time of Services — 

Morning 10.30, Afternoon 2.30, and Evening 6 o'clock. 

Collections in Aid of the Sunday School Funds. 



On Monday Evening, the 14th, 

A Paper will be Read by the Superintendent of the 

Easton School on the 

History of Methodism in Portland. 

The Chair will be taken by the Rev. C. Symes. 



On Tuesday Evening, the 15th, 
A Special Service will be held, at which each Teacher and 
Scholar in the Easton, Southwell, and Weston Sunday 
Schools will be Presented with a Bible to Com- 
memorate the Event. 

Mr. John P. Scriven will Preside. 



On Wednesday Evening, the 16th, 

The Rev. W D. Walters (from London) will give an 

Address. Subject — Methodism. 

Mr. William Attwooll will take the Chair. 



viii PREFACE 

On Thursday Evening, the 17th, 
Mr. Richard Webber (of London) will give a Lecture on 

John Wesley and His Hymn-Book. 

The Lecture will be Interspersed with the Singing of some 

selected Hymns to Old Tunes. 

The Rev. S. Atkinson, M.A., will Preside. 



On Friday Evening, the 18th, 

A Special Prayer Meeting will be held, conducted by 

Mr. W- T. Denney. 



The Services each Week Evening will be held in the 
Easton Chapel, and commence at 7.15 o'clock. 

Collections on Monday and Wednesday Evenings will be 
made on behalf of the Sunday School Funds. On Thursday 
Evening a Collection will be made on behalf of the 
EastOn Trust Funds. 

Easton Square, 
Portland, Dec. 8th, 1891. 

The paper read by the Superintendent of the 
Easton Sunday School was thought to contain 
information which it would be desirable to retain, 
and many requests have since been made to the 
reader to give it more permanent form. I have 
at last consented to do this, and to embody in 
a printed volume such additional information as I 
believe will be of equal interest to the public. 



PREFACE ix 

I make no claim to literarv merit, for I am 
simply welding together what I have been able to 
collect from the writings of others. 

It has been collected from very many sources, 
and, as far as I am able, I desire to acknowledge 
my obligation to all who have put at my disposal 
information which I have been able to use in com- 
piling this book. 

Among these friends, I would specially mention 
Mrs. William Gibbs and family, now residing at 
Cardiff; the Eev. John Augustine Beazor, the 
Rector of Portland, who has kindly furnished me 
with information from the old parish registers. 
Much has been culled from early Methodist 
Magazines, also from books now out of print ; 
especially I should mention Memoirs of Raithby Hall, 
and a little tract called Methodism in Dorset. 

I am also indebted to the family of the late Mr. 
William Lowman, of Southwell, for the perusal of 
his writings, which have afforded me very much 
information on general subjects as well as 
Methodism. 



x PREFACE 

It has been my privilege to examine various 
old parish books and papers, and from the ancient 
records of the island I have obtained much inter- 
esting information. I have also borrowed from 
Hutchins's History of Dorset This has enabled 
me to incorporate with my paper on Methodism 
what I have called " A Page of Church History." 

In taking this step, I trust I shall afford an 
hour's interesting reading, not only to Methodists, 
but to many others of my friends. 

With this hope, I subscribe myself your servant, 

ROBERT PEARCE. 

Easton Square, Portland. 



CONTENTS 



PART I.— THE INTRODUCTION OF METHODISM 

INTO PORTLAND 

CHAP. PAGE 

I. Methodism — William Nelson and Charles 

"Wesley 1 



PART II.— A PAGE OF CHURCH HISTORY 

II. Ye Olde Parrish Church of St. Andrew, and 

Vicar's House 14 

III. Ye Tabernacle and the New Church . . 34 

IV. Ye Olde Church Yarde 40 



PART III.— THE ESTABLISHMENT AND GROWTH 
OF METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

V. Methodism Established in Portland by Mr. 

Brackenbury 51 

VI. Superstition and Trouble 76 

VII. First Chapel on the Hill 94 

VIII. Strangers and Strange Events . . . 108 

IX. New Laws and Ancient Customs . . . 122 

X. The Jubilee of Methodism in Portland . . 139 



Apprndix 



14G 



XI 



LIST OF ILLUSTKATIONS 



PAGE 

Bible and Common Prayer Book belonging to St. 

Andrew's Church, Portland . . . Frontispiece 
House at Straits, where Charles Wesley is said 

to have Preached . 3 

William Nelson's Headstone 13 

Ruins of St. Andrew's Church and Churchyard, 

Portland 14 

Ruins of the Old Rectory, Wakeham, Portland . 24 

The New Church 43 

Mr. Brackenbury's House 56 

The Old Chapel and Minister's House, built by 

Mr. Brackenbury 61 

Picture from the old Church Bible .... 87 
Fly Leaf of Common Prayer Book, with Auto- 
graphs of Queen Anne and the Earl of 

Nottingham Ill 

Principal Doorway of St. Andrew's Church (1686), 

with Records of Presentation, etc. . . .129 



XII 



METHODISM IN PORTLAND 



$art 31 



THE INTRODUCTION OF METHODISM INTO 

PORTLAND 



CHAPTER I 

METHODISM WILLIAM NELSON AND CHARLES WESLEY 

I have found it exceedingly difficult to commence 
writing upon this intensely interesting subject, 
because in my search for information I have been 
frequently turning up additional facts, and securing 
fuller details than I had already obtained. I am 
more than compensated for any trouble taken, by 
the pleasure I have had in the search, and the joy 
in discovering anything new. 

The services referred to in the Preface were held 
to celebrate the establishment of Methodism in 
Portland, not its introduction. It cannot, perhaps, 



2 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

be made perfectly certain how Methodism was first 
introduced into the island. The very first mention 
I have been able to discover of the connection of 
Portland with Methodism is found in Smith's 
History of Methodism. Here, in the minutes, May 
1746, Portland forms part of the Bristol Circuit, 
which at that time comprised Bristol, Somerset- 
shire, Portland, Wilts, Oxfordshire, and Gloucester- 
shire. At this time the whole of England and 
Wales was comprised in seven circuits, and Bristol 
stood second. 

In June of the same year the Bev. Charles 
Wesley visited the island. We may say it was 
the result of an accident that he came to Portland, 
for in his Journal we read : — 

June 4th and 5th, 1746. — Driving down a steep hill on 
our way to Sherborne, the horse stumbled and threw me out 
of the seat. I fell on my back upon the wheel ; my feet were 
entangled in the chaise, but the beast stood stock still, so I 
received no harm, but was only stunned and dirtied. By 
nine o'clock at night we were glad to reach the house of 
William Nelson in Portland. 

Of this visit, one account, written in 1861 in 
the Sunday at Home, says : " Charles Wesley made 



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WILLIAM NELSON AND CHARLES WESLEY 3 

his way to Fortune's Well, and took up his abode 
with William Nelson, a quarryman." 

The same article gives a picture purporting to 
be William Nelson's house in which Charles 
Wesley preached. This house, however, we 
recognise standing in Straits, on the top of the 
hill, and was not likely to have been Nelson's 
residence. 

I have endeavoured to trace the name of 
William Nelson in the old parish rate books, 
and am pleased to say with success. 

In an old rate book, dating from 1768, I find 
his name as a ratepayer each year down to 1770, 
in which year the name of William Nelson is 
erased by a stroke of the pen, and the name of 
Jane Nelson entered for the same amount of 
rate. 

By the kind assistance of the rector (the Rev. 
Canon Beazor), I find that William Nelson was 
buried in St. George's Churchyard in 1770, which 
had only then been opened about four years. The 
name of Jane Nelson does not occur in the follow- 
ing year, nor, I am glad to say, is her name among 
the recipients of parish relief. 



4 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

The position of the name in the rate book is 
that of the first in the Below Hill district, and 
not at Straits. It can therefore only be reconciled 
with the tradition respecting the house in Straits 
and the article referred to, by supposing that this 
house was not the residence of William Nelson, but 
simply the house on the hill, in which Charles 
Wesley preached. 

The name of William Nelson is not found in 
the old parish rate book, dating from 1697 
to 1742. He must have come to Portland about 
the year 1743, as from 1744 to 1758 he is 
a conspicuous figure in the religious life of the 
island. 

This William Nelson was supposed to have 
been the brother of John Nelson, the Yorkshire 
stonemason, who was so closely intimate with John 
Wesley. That, like John, he was employed in 
London as a mason, and found his way to Port- 
land, in some way connected with the stone in- 
dustry. That, like John too, he was a Methodist, 
and on coming to Portland exerted what influence 
he could in the interest of this new sect of 
religion. 



WILLIAM NELSON AND CHARLES WESLEY 5 

If this was so (and there seems much probability 
of it), we are led to the conclusion that William 
Nelson first introduced Methodism into Portland. 
He was evidently a man well known to Charles 
Wesley, or Mr. Wesley could not have made so 
directly for his house when thrown out of the 
carriage on his way to Sherborne. 

When we remember how that Portland at this 
time was isolated from the mainland, and that 
the means of communication were difficult, it is 
surprising that Methodism should have been intro- 
duced so early into the island, for the Methodist 
Society had itself only been established seven 
years before the visit of Charles Wesley. 

Charles Wesley goes on to say in his Journal : — 

June 6th. — I preached to a house full of loving, staring 
people. Some wept, but most looked quite unawakened. At 
noon and night I preached on a hill in the midst of the 
island ; most of the inhabitants came to hear, but few as yet 
felt the burden of sin or the want of a Saviour. 

June 8th (Sunday). — After evening service, we had all the 
islanders that were able to come. I asked, " Is it nothing to 
you, all ye that pass by ? " About half a dozen answered, 
" It is nothing to us," by turning their backs ; but the rest 
answered with greater signs of emotion than I had observed 



6 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

before. I found faith at this time that our labour would not 
be in vain. 

June 9th. — At Southwell, the farthest village, I expounded 
the Song of Simeon. Some very old men attended. I 
distributed a few books among them, rode round the island, 
and returned by noon to preach on the hill, and by night at 
my lodgings. 

The wording here seems to confirm the idea 
already suggested, that William Nelson's house 
was not on the hill. 

The Journal continues : — 

Now the power and blessing came. My mouth and 
their hearts were opened. The rocks were broken in pieces, 
and melted into tears on every side. I continued exhorting 
them from seven till ten to save themselves from this un- 
toward generation. "We could hardly part. I left the little 
Society of twenty members confirmed and comforted. 

Here we have the evidence of the existence of 
a Society of Methodists in the island, confirmed and 
comforted by the visit of Charles Wesley. 

It was on the occasion of this visit that Charles 
Wesley was inspired to write the hymn — 

Come, Thou all-victorious Lord ! 

Thy power to us make known; 
Strike with the hammer of Thy word, 

And break these hearts of stone, 



WILLIAM NELSON AND CHARLES WESLEY 7 

which he heads with the remark : " Written before 
preaching at Portland." 

It is only reasonable to suppose that the reviv- 
ing influence which must have attended the labours 
of Charles Wesley on this visit would much stimu- 
late the little company of Methodists. 

It is practically certain that William Nelson 
was the first person to introduce Methodism into 
Portland. He must have been a comparatively 
young man when he came to the island — probably 
thirty-one or thirty-two years of age. It has been 
my good fortune to be able to trace him as a 
resident for a period of twenty-six years. 

I am inclined to think the Jane Nelson referred 
to must have been the sister of William. It 
appears from the parish register that she also died 
at Portland, having survived William four years. 
The record of her burial states that she was the 
daughter of Abraham and Eebecca Nelson. 

There is ample evidence to prove that William 
Nelson took a prominent and active part in the 
religious life of the island. As a Methodist and 
the founder of Methodism in Portland, his duties 
would be important and responsible. Upon him 



8 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

fell the care of the little Society which he had 
gathered around him, and which in the year 1746 
numbered twenty members. 

We find, although he had formed a little Society 
of Methodists, he had, as was customary with the 
early Methodists, retained his connection with the 
Established Church, and took a prominent part in 
that interesting period of our church history which 
embraced the last fifteen years of the old church at 
Wakeham and the building of the new at Eeforne. 

In the years 1744 and 1745, rates were made 
" for the repair of the church and furniture," and 
the method adopted was peculiar, and based upon 
the " reeve " or " quit rent." 

Assessment was made in the following manner, 
viz. : — 

" Every shilling on the reeve staff (which repre- 
sented four acres of land) was assessed to pay six- 
pence to the rate, and to be collected as low as on 
threepence." " The forty shares of the farm to pay 
sixpence per share." 

William Nelson, in each of the above years, 
paid sixpence to the rate, which represents him as 
the owner of four acres of land. 



WILLIAM NELSON AND CHARLES WESLEY 9 

In the year 1753, on the 30th of August, a 
very important vestry meeting was called, of which 
the following is a copy : — 

Whereas the chief inhabitants of the Island of Portland 
have at this Vestry held in the Church of Portland ye 30th 
of August 1753 — On purpose to inquire into the ruinous 
decayed state of said Church do nominate and appoint for 
ourselves as well as the rest of the inhabitants in general 
John Tucker and Richard Tucker of Weymouth Esqrs., 
Mr. John Cooth Rector of ye said Island, Mr. Edward Pearce, 
Mr. Colpass Attwooll and Mr. Thomas Gilbert Architect, to 
inspect into the plans, estimates, and all designs as the said 
Thomas Gilbert Architect as aforesaid, together with Mr. 
Edward Pearce and Mr. Colpass Attwooll and the aforesaid 
Gentlemen shall think proper for the immediate repair of 
this our Church or the building of a new one, in the cheapest 
and convenient manner they possibly can, do and contrive, 
and that such final measures plans and designs or either for 
these purposes as they shall approve, of by ye carefulness of 
Mr. Thomas Gilbert Architect, for the good and benefit of 
the inhabitants, — Shall be laid before a Vestry such plans 
when finished in order to consult on Methods for raising 
money for either purpose that is to say either to repair the 
old framework of the Church or to erect a new one. 

Subscribers— William Pearce, Constable. 

Wm. Ousley Attwooll, Churchwarden. 

Augustine Elliott ") 

™ . „ T1 . , \ Overseers. 

Charles Whittle i 

Andrew Stone. 



io METHOpiSM IN PORTLAND 

Wm. Scholar. 
Wm. Pearce. 
John Ayles. 
Edward Attwooll. 
Wm. Stone. 
Will Gilbert. 
Owen Pearce. 
William Nelson. 
Thomas Read. 
Robert Pearce. 

William Nelson was sufficiently interested not 
only to attend this meeting, but to sign his name 
in the parish book in favour of the resolution. It 
will perhaps interest some of my friends to know 
what other names are found in the same connection, 
and for that reason I have given them above. 

The committee then appointed immediately 
gave themselves to the study of the subject, and 
on the 8th of November following were ready with 
their report, and recommended a scheme which at 
once' received the cordial approval of the parishioners, 
as will be seen by the following extracts from the 
old parish books : — 

At a Vestry held this eight day of November 1753 a report 
was made and appointed ye 30th August last to consider and 
determine whether to repair the old or to build a new Church 



WILLIAM NELSON AND CHARLES WESLEY n 

— which report has been now read and is approved of and 
ordered to be entered in the parish book and it is resolved 
and agreed that the method therein proposed for raising 
money to carry on and finish the building a new Church shall 
be observed and put in execution and that the first money 
applied towards carrying on of same be the £250 out of the 
Parish stock of Tonnage and all such gifts and contributions 
as may be received between this and Midsummer next as far 
as it will go — and that in the meantime a petition may be 
prepared, humbly beseeching his Majesty King George for 
his bounty towards finishing this work — and whatever those 
summs may fall short of raising ye money required to carry 
on and finishing ye building shall be levied by a quarterly 
payment in ye manner and proportion settled in ye said 
report of ye Trustees — the first money to be raised on the in- 
habitants not to begin till Midsummer next and at this Vestry 
it is further agreed and resolved that all money given or to be 
collected for the use of this building shall from time to time 
be lodged in the hands of Mr. Edward Pearce of Southwell 
and Mr. Colpass Attwooll of Chessel and by them paid to Mr. 
Thos. Gilbert in such proportion as may be settled in the 
contract to be made for performing ye same and that — Jno. 
Tucker Esqr. of Weymouth Mr. Richard Tucker merchant 
Mr. Ed. Pearce and Mr. Colpass Attwooll and Mr. John Cooth 
be desired to act as Trustees in behalf of the Inhabitants 
of the Island To contract with Mr. Thomas Gilbert and to 
settle ye terms and proportion of paying him for the same 
which this Vestry for the whole Island do give and promise 
to confirm and fulfill. 

Again William Nelson supports this most im- 



12 METHQDISM IN PORTLAND 

portant undertaking by signing his name in its 
favour. 

In the year 1756, and three following years, it 
was found necessary, in order to carry out the great 
work to which the islanders^ had now pledged 
themselves, to appoint a committee for the purpose 
of collecting the moneys that had been assessed, 
and we find for the first year William Nelson was 
one of the persons selected for this purpose. His 
name appears as one of the collectors for the 
Fortune's Well District. The collectors are changed 
each year ; but William Nelson is present, and sup- 
ports the election of his successors. Thus we see 
he was most active in support of the movement 
for building the new church at Eeforne. 

This church was sufficiently advanced to admit 
of its being consecrated in the year 1766 — after 
which William Nelson survived only four years, 
when on the 10th day of March 1770 he passed 
away to his rest. 

He was among the earliest of those buried in the 
new churchyard, and I have been fortunate to dis- 
cover his grave, which I am happy to say is marked 
by a stone. The headstone is somewhat less than 




WILLIAM KELSON'S HEADSTONE. 
(From a Photograph by Mr. W. Pangbourne.) 



WILLIAM NELSON AND CHARLES WESLEY 13 

the ordinary size, and may be found on the south 
side of the church, in the fourth row from the 
street, and the seventh stone in the row from the 
church. 

It has the following inscription : — 

In Memory of 

WILLIAM NELSON 

who departed this life 

the 10th day of March 1770 

Aged 58 years. 



Then let us wait to see the day, 

To hear the joyful word ; 

To answer, lo ! we come away, 

We die to meet our Lord. 



$art HE 

A PAGE OF CHURCH HISTORY 



CHAPTER II 

YE OLDE PARRISH CHURCH OF ST. ANDREW, AND 

VICAR'S HOUSE 

I think it will not be out of place to give here 
a few particulars of the old church and churchyard 
at Wakeham, and thus commence what I have 
called " A Page of Church History." 

The site of the old church and the churchyard 
will, I think, be admitted to be one of the most 
interesting and picturesque spots on the island, 
and it is matter of surprise and regret that such a 
place should be treated as the exclusive right of 
one person. That any arrangement should be 
made to exclude the inhabitants whose ancestors 

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YE OLDE PARRISH CHURCH 15 

worshipped in the old church, and found their last 
resting-place in the graveyard, seems to indicate at 
least a want of consideration for the feelings of the 
islanders. 

I cannot pretend to have any certain knowledge 
of the origin of the old sanctuary, nor can I tell 
when it was built. It is supposed that there have 
been at least three successive buildings on or near 
the same site. It was, however, dedicated to St. 
Andrew in the year 1475. See inscription on 
picture at p. 129. 

It would appear that a church existed here many 
years before this date, and possibly from the days 
of the Saxons, who left their impression in the 
island in many of our words and customs. 

The earliest reference that I have been able to 
discover dates from the year 1302, when the Eev 
John Golde was appointed rector. 

Some few years after this, during the wars with 
France, when Edward in. attempted to secure the 
French throne, the enemy landed in Portland, and 
burnt down the church. This is largely borne out 
by the following evidence taken at the Inquisitio 
Nonarum, 



1 6 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

By an Act passed in the reign of Edward in., 
about the year 1341, a tax was to be levied for 
two years upon farm and other produce to help 
pay the expenditure in the Scotch and French 
wars. The ninth part of such produce was to be 
paid, and the evidence given at this inquiry in 
respect to Portland was to the following effect, 
viz. : — 

John Gilbert, Thomas Peirce, John Thomas, 
John Algar, George Knight, William Peirce, 
parishioners of Portland, being sworn, presented 
that the church was taxed in twenty-four marks, 
and that the ninth part of sheaves, fleeces, and 
lambs was worth yearly £10, 8s. 9d. ; that the 
domain of the rector was worth lis. 3d. per 
annum, the freewill offerings lis., and the tithe of 
fishing £10, in which the profit of the church 
chiefly consisted; and that the said parish by 
the enemies of England was burnt and destroyed, 
and the sheep and other cattle carried off. 

A writer about the year 1653, speaking of 
the old Portland church, says it was built of 
French stone from Caen. This seems strange 
to us, when we think of the large quantities of 



YE OLDE PARRISH CHURCH tj 

stone scattered about the weirs in the immediate 
neighbourhood. 

Another church was erected, and, as we have 
said, dedicated in the year 1475 to St. Andrew. 

Coming down to that period in English history 
when the nation was distracted by the wars between 
the King and the Parliament, it is supposed Oliver 
Cromwell visited the island. 

The inhabitants of Portland, with their militia, 
under the governor of the island, took the side of 
King Charles. 

The Parliamentary troops advanced to the island, 
and attacked the castle first in the year 1642. 
Between that date and the year 1646 several 
conflicts took place, but on the 4th of April of 
this latter year Cromwell's troops were entirely 
victorious, and the island fell into their hands. 

The islanders and King's party, although con- 
quered, were able to make terms, which, under the 
circumstances, must be considered favourable. 

The following is a copy of the treaty or agree- 
ment made at the time : — 

April 4, 1646. It is agreed upon between Captain William 
Batten, Esq. Vice- Admiral, and Commissioner- in-Chief of all 



1 8 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

the forces by sea for King and Parliament, and Colonel 
Thomas Sidney Gollop, Governor of the castle and isle of 
Portland, in manner following : — 

1. That the said Colonel Gollop shall on Monday next, by 
ten o'clock, April 9, in the forenoon, surrender and yield up 
to the said Vice- Admiral, for the use of the Parliament, 
the castle and island of Portland, together with all the 
cannon, arms, and ammunition there, and not contained in 
the ensuing articles ; and that, till the further pleasure 
of the Parliament be signified, all is to be left in the 
hands of such an officer of Weymouth garrison as the 
said Vice-Admiral and Colonel William Sydenham shall 
appoint. 

2. That all officers and soldiers now in the island and 
castle of Portland shall have free liberty to march away 
with all their horses, not surmounting the number 15, full 
arms, match alight, bullet in mouth, colours displayed, drums 
beating, and bag and baggage to Oxford, and £100 delivered 
to the officers in lieu of one week's pay for all the officers and 
marching soldiers within the garrison, and that they shall 
have horses and carriages provided to carrie their baggage 
and goods, and not to be sollicited to forsake their colours in 
their march. 

3. That all soldiers that are willing shall have free leave 
to take up armes for the Parliament, and that all such shall 
have present entertainment and constant pay, as also 2s. 
advance, and cloaths for everie soldier ; and such as are 
willing to go to their owne homes shall have passes ; and such 
as desire to march to Oxford safe conduct ; and not to be 
compelled to march above 8 or 10 miles a day. 

4. That the porter, gunners, and such other officers that 



YE OLDE PARRISH CHURCH 19 

have places in the castle of Portland, shall either be continued 
in their place or have satisfaction for the same. 

5. That wee do faithfully promise to use our best endeavours 
to both houses of Parliament for the speedy taking off of 
their several sequestrations (if any such be) upon any of their 
estates, and that they may repossess their lands, goods, and 
chattels, free as formerly they have done. 

6. That the islanders of Portland shall peaceably enjoy the 
Protestant religion, agreeable with and grounded on the 
word of God, and according to such discipline as is or shall 
bee used and established by Parliament, and that they shall 
have no other preacher preferred unto them but such as 
is orthodox, and without any just exception. 

7. That everie islander shall enjoy their lands and estates 
as formerly they have done, notwithstanding any act of 
hostilitie commenced against the Parliament. 

8. That no oath or imposition or taxe shall be imposed upon 
any of the inhabitants or others now resident in the island 
other than what shall be enjoined by the Parliament, and 
conformable to other parts of the kingdom. 

9. That all strangers now in the island, such as Lieutenant- 
Colonel Duke, Lieutenant Armstrong, Robert Mohun, gent., 
John Browne, and William Ward, yeoman, shall have their 
libertie and freedome quietlie to go to their several habita- 
tions, and to carrie with them their horse?, amies, and all 
such other goods as properly doe belong to them, and there 
remain without molestation or trouble. 

10. Lastly, that the late Governor on the island, for the 
part that was taken there when the island was lost to the 
King's forces, shall not bee Governor there any more during 
the time of this warre. 



20 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

Whatever resistance was made after the castle 
was taken, it is impossible to say. It is, however, 
certain that the church and rectory became the 
special objects of Cromwell's vengeance. This fact 
is confirmed by an entry in the ancient records 
of the island, which reads as follows : — 

A Terrier made the 14th day of September in the year 
of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eighty four 
1784 of all the Glebe lands in the Liberty of the Island and 
Manor of Portland, with the accustomed Tythes time 
immemorial — 

Glebe Lands — One Parsonage House in the Village of 
Wakeham demolished and burnt down by the Usurper 
Ohver Cromwell and hasn't been rebuilded ever since. 

" One Barn and Stable adjoining. One Meadow Close on 
the North side of the said Parsonage House, containing half 
an aker Together with a Hay Reak place adjoining. 

One place at the South end of said Parsonage House 
J of an aker. 

Whatever may have been the extent of the 
damage done to the old church, it was sufficiently 
restored by the inhabitants for public worship, and 
so continued to the year 1755. 

The picture forming our frontispiece and those 
at pp. 87, 111, and 129 are from photographs 
taken of two very old books which have special 



YE OLDE PARRISH CHURCH 21 

connection with Portland. They were the Bible 
and Common Prayer Book used in the old parish 
church at Wakeham, and now preserved in the 
Dorset County Museum. 

The Bible is over 260 years old — date 1634. 
It is printed in black letter, and was very strongly 
bound. It must have done good service for the 
parish. At a vestry meeting held in the old 
church on the 3rd of November 1730 it was sold 
for ten shillings and sixpence to Daniel Andrews, 
who was then the parish clerk. For a period of 
one hundred and twenty years it remained in the 
family of the Andrewses, and was used as a Family 
Bible. There are several records relating to the 
family in it. Also one as follows : " Daniell Andrews 
his book and pen. This was the Church Bibell." 
On the fly-leaf at the end there are written three 
or four verses of S. Crossman's hymn, " My life's 
a shade, my days apace to death decline." 

It was obtained from the family by the late 
Captain Manning, and presented to the Dorset 
County Museum in the year 1856. There are in 
it several chronological charts and emblematical 
pictures. That at p. 87 is taken from this 



22 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

book, and stands between the Apocrypha and the 
New Testament. 

The Common Prayer-Book has special interest, 
having been presented to the parish church by 
Queen Anne. On the fly-leaf, but scarcely visible 
now, are the autographs of Queen Anne and the 
Earl of Nottingham, one of her principal ministers 
of State. The record of its presentation appears 
to be in the handwriting of the earl, and dates 
from Hampton Court, August 3rd, 1708. 

This book was also sold at the same time as the 
Bible. The purchaser was one William Hinde, and 
the price four shillings. In it are several records 
relating to the Hinde family. By some means it 
found its way to one of the London bookstalls, 
where it was discovered by the Eev. W Niven. 
Being acquainted with the Eev. David Hogarth, 
then rector of Portland, Mr. Niven sent it to him 
as a present. Mr. Hogarth presented it to the 
Dorset County Museum. It has been re-bound, 
which is very strongly and nicely done. It will be 
seen by the frontispiece that it contains the service 
of healing by the king. This is very interesting 
reading, but the service and the faith in the power 



YE OLDE PARRISH CHURCH 23 

of the king to heal diseases belongs certainly to the 
past. It very well accords, however, with the 
following old Portland legend, which is given in a 
very old book as a historical fact : — 

"In November 1457, in Portland, was seen a 
cock coming out of the sea, having a great crest on 
its head, a great red beard, and legs half a yard 
long. He stood on the water and crowed three 
times, and every time turned himself about, and 
beckoned with his head north, south, and west. 
He was in colour like a pheasant, and when he had 
crowed he vanished." x 

The picture at p. 129 is also from this old book, 
and contains a later record of the presentation and 
a pen-and-ink sketch of the principal doorway of 
the old church, as it was in 1686. 

I am indebted to Mr. Moule, the curator of the 
Dorset County Museum, for the opportunity of 
examining these old books and the privilege of 
obtaining the photographs. The view at p. 24 
of the vicar's house at Wakeham is from a print 
kindly lent me by Mr. Moule. 

The rectory, which stood on the west side of 
1 Holinshed, vol. ii. p. 645, 



24 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

Wakeham Street, adjoining the Tything Barn and 
other similar buildings, was said to have been a fine 
house, and is referred to by Leland in his itinerary, 
written about the time of Queen Elizabeth, as the 
" best building in the isle." 

By the above entry in the parish records, we 
know that this building had not been restored. 

During the Civil Wars, as Portland was a royal 
manor, it was only natural that Portlanders should 
warmly espouse the royal cause. The island was 
one of the last places to yield to the Parliamentary 
party. 

At the early period of these troubles Dr. Hench- 
man was the rector of Portland. He got into 
financial difficulties — doubtless in consequence of 
the troublous times — was sequestered, and paid 
£200 for his composition. He was succeeded in 
the year 1643 by the Bev. Henry Way. 

Dr. Henchman, however, was a strong partisan, 
and stood closely by the king, as the following 
extract from Hutchins's History of Dorset will 
show : — 

Humphry Henchman, D.D., was a native of London, 
student and fellow of Clare Hall, in Cambridge, where 




p 

w 



•r 

'A 



YE OLDE PARRISH CHURCH 25 

several of his name, and probably of his family, graduated, 
precentor of Sarum 1622, canon residentiary and prebendary 
of the prebend of Teynton Regis cum Yalmpton, in that 
church, 1638. He was very instrumental in forwarding the 
King's escape to France after the battle of Worcester. Lord 
Clarendon tells us, that upon the disappointment of the 
vessel that was hired at Lyme to carry the King, he was 
forced to change his purpose, and to go into Wiltshire. 
Leaving Colonel Windham's house, he was conducted to 
Hele House, near Salisbury, then inhabited by the widow of 
Sergeant Hyde. Here he supped with Dr. Henchman, and 
other gentlemen who were accidentally met in the house. 

After remaining concealed for some days, he was attended 
by Dr. Henchman on foot to Clarendon Park corner, where 
he took horse with Colonel Philips, and proceeded to 
Hambledon, in Hampshire, and from thence to Brighthelm- 
stone, where a bark had been provided to carry him to 
France. 

A faithful friend, and a successful one, must needs be 
remembered after such a time of danger. Dr. Henchman was, 
after the Restoration, consecrated Bishop of Sarum 1660, and 
translated to London 1663, and appointed Lord Almoner. 
He died October 7, 1675, and is buried in the parish church 
of Fulham. He left £767 to St. Paul's. 

After this time, and down to the year 1837, it 
seems probable that the rectors of the parish did 
not reside on the island, but generally deputed 
their duties to curates or ministers in charge. 

From the close of the seventeenth century the 



26 METHpDISM IN PORTLAND 

clerical signatures in the old parish books are gene- 
rally those of curates. We find in the year 1696 
the signature of Henry Emdry, curate; in 1726, 
Thomas Franklin, minister; in 1727, John Pope, 
curate. The signatures of Eichard Daubney as 
curate extend over several years. He ministered 
to the spiritual needs of the island during the 
years which covered the period of transition from 
the old church to the new. 

In the early part of the present century the 
Rev. John Manning was the minister in charge. 
He was granted the Portland Castle for his 
residence in 1816, and spent a considerable sum 
out of his own pocket in putting the place in 
repair, it being at that time in a very dilapidated 
condition. Following this gentleman, Mr. Porte 
was appointed. Both the latter officiated for the 
Rev. C. E. North, M.A., who was the rector from 
1811 to 1833. In the latter year he resigned, 
and was followed by the Rev. John Harrington, 
M.A., who was instituted on the 7 th of December 
of the same year. 

The site of the old church has been thought to 
have been inconvenient and outlandish. Possibly 



YE OLDE PARRISH CHURCH 27 

it was originally selected for the protection it 
would obtain from the old Eufus or Bow and 
Arrow Castle. This old pile was supposed to have 
been built by William Kufus between the years 
1087 and 1100. 

Any church built in the island at this period 
certainly needed more than ordinary protection. 
Prior to these years Portland had been the scene 
of many conflicts between the islanders and 
foreigners. 

There is a most interesting reference to this 
old church in a book written by Coker, entitled 
A Particular Survey of Dorset, and reads as follows : 
" On the South point stands the onlie Church soe 
near the sea, that for safetie of it they have been 
forced to wall the Church Yarde Banks almost of 
an incredible height, soe that it even afrighte one 
to look down." 

For a long series of years preceding its 
abandonment the old church had been a con- 
tinuous source of expense. Year after year special 
efforts were made to keep it in a sufficient state 
of repair for public worship. 

A very large proportion of the tonnage money 



28 METHQDISM IN PORTLAND 

arising out of the royalty on stone taken from 
the parish lands, and known in the present day 
as the " Grant Money," was spent upon the old 
building. 

In addition to this, special rates were frequently 
made, such as referred to on p. 8, but frequently 
extended as follows : " Every Beast to pay 3d., 
and every twenty sheep 6d." 

We get some idea of the condition of the old 
church by a study of the expenses incurred. 

That there was a gallery we know from expenses 
laid out about it, and as late as the year 1745 a 
portion is referred to as the " new gallery." 

There was also a tower standing some three 
feet from the church which was often repaired. 
In the year 1732 several pounds were spent 
upon this structure. It seemed, however, to serve 
no purpose, for we learn there were no bells in 
it. No trace of this tower is now to be seen, 
which is accounted for by the fact that Mr. 
Thomas Gilbert, the architect and builder of 
the new church, was permitted by his contract 
to take any part of the old church for building 
the new. 



YE OLDE PARRISH CHURCH 29 

There was one parish pew in the church, which 
was let at five shillings per year. A Mr. 
Christopher Phillipson rented this pew from the 
year 1724 probably down to the year that 
service was removed from the church to the 
Tabernacle, a temporary structure to be referred to 
subsequently. All the rest of the pews (except 
one which is supposed to have belonged to the 
rector) were movable, and made after the pattern 
of the old high back seats, known by the name of 
" settles." 

There is a peculiar interest attending these old 
times, when Solomon Ayles was clerk at a salary 
of 20s. per year, and William Winter was "bed- 
man " (which was the old term for sexton) at 6 s. 
per year ; when a sum was paid regularly, for 
" sweeping the church and pecking the lane " ; 
when 2s. 6d. was a regular entry in the church 
accounts for " washing the linen and scouring the 
pewter " ; when the parish officers were constantly 
paying for " gimmers " (which I imagine was a 
kind of nail); when various sums were spent 
for repairing " Ye Pullpett," and there was " laid 
out for a large brush to sweep ye Cobbwebbs in 



30 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

ye Church Is. 8d," and when 4s. 6d. was "laid 
out to the Goldsmith for mending the silver 
tumbler"; when it was a regular custom to pay 
2d. per dozen for sparrow heads, 4d. for a pole 
cat, Is. for an otter, and 2s. 6d. for a fox — the 
two latter items occur only rarely, but sparrows 
and pole cats were evidently numerous, and 
considered the dread enemies of the people. 

Eeferring again to the visit of Charles Wesley in 
the year 1746, he says in his Journal — June 8th, 
which was Sunday, — " After evening service we had 
all the islanders that were able to come." We are 
led to ask, What evening service did he refer to ? 
Was it that held by the rector in the old church 
at Wakeham ? Or did Charles Wesley preach 
there himself ? This was the only place of 
worship in the island at that time. 

We know it was the custom of the Wesleys 
(who were both clergymen of the Church of 
England) to preach in the churches of the places 
they visited. We think, too, if this privilege had 
been refused the Eev. Charles Wesley here, he 
would have noted it in his Journal. 

It is not, therefore, a wild speculation to say it is 



YE OLDE PARRISH CHURCH 31 

probable that Charles Wesley himself preached in 
the old church on the Sunday evening referred to. 

There is a most interesting record in the old 
parish writings of the year preceding Charles 
Wesley's visit, which to my mind makes it more 
than probable that the islanders would be glad to 
have him preach. It may be said of this time as 
was said in the days of Samuel of old, " The word 
of the Lord was precious in those days." 

The Eev. Daniel Harris was the rector at the 
time, and the following is a copy of the record 
above referred to : — 

Portland, ye 27 of November 1745. 

At a general meeting this day by order of a Vestry from 
the Churchwardens by a complaint from the Parishioners 
at the Parish Church. 

We the subscribers hereunder mentioned being the 
majority and principal inhabitants of the Parish aforesaid 
that whereas for a long time since our Minister Mr. Daniel 
Harris have not done his duty by preaching in our Church at 
several Sundays and have not preached at one holy day this 
long time nor at ye last fast day by order of His Majesty's 
Proclamation when he have been very well in health and 
able to go to the Church to preach at these days ordained as 
likewise the 5th of November the 30th of January &c, and 
have not read any Act of Parliament. And we do hereby 



32 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

jointly agree to and with they the Churchwardens that they 
shall for the future endeavour to provide a better regulation 
for the Doctrine to be preached in our Church as was ever 
formerly preached and in due season. 

I may follow this by giving another equally 
interesting record, which shows the reverend rector 
took an active interest in other matters, for a large 
part of the original record is in the handwriting 
of the reverend gentleman himself. 

The record is as follows : — 

Whereas Capt. James Stares commander of the Waraker 
Sloop belonging to ye Customs did on ye 12th of November 
1|731 seize in the Isle of Portland in ye County of Dorset an 
Irish vessel called the Seahorse laden with 496 Barrels of 
Irish butter for illegal importation of the said butter accord- 
ing to an Act of Parliament in that cause. And upon the 
30th of November 1731 John Mitchell and Sydenham 
"Williams two of His Majesty's Justice of the Peace for ye 
said County did condemn ye said Irish vessel with all her 
tackle and apparel and 496 barrels of Irish butter as forfeited, 
one moiety thereof to Capt. James Stares the seizer thereof, 
and the other moiety to the Churchwardens and Constable 
for the use of the poor of the parish of Portland being the 
place where the same was seized. 

We ye Minister, Churchwardens and major part of ye 
inhabitants of ye parish aforesaid assembled in a Vestry this 
eighth day of December 1731 do agree that one moiety of ye 
aforesaid vessel shall be sold to ye best advantage, and like- 



YE OLDE PARRISH CHURCH 33 

wise one moiety of ye butter shall be sold to ye inhabitants 
of ye aforesaid parish for three farthings per pound, and 
whatsoever money ye said vessel and butter shall amount to 
after ye charges and expenses are deducted, shall remain for 
ye use of ye Poor of ye Parish of Portland aforesaid to be 
disposed of by ye Churchwardens and Overseers. 

And we do further agree that if any prosecution or damages 
shall accrue to Thomas Comben and John Wiggatt Church- 
wardens, Robt. Elliott Constable, Daniel Andrews and Owen 
Elliott Overseers, to them, or any of them, in acting in this 
affair shall be made good at ye charge and expense of ye 
Parish. 

Signed by Daniel Harris Rector and 54 others. 

The following is an account of the amount 
realised by the sale of the butter : — 

And Where as one moiety of ye 496 Barriels of Irish 
Butter have been sold amongest the Inhabitance of ye parish 
of Portland and after charges and expenses are deducted for 
condemning ye said Butter there remains £23, 18s. 4d. 



CHAPTEE III 

YE TABERNACLE AND THE NEW CHURCH 

These records give us some idea of the religious 
condition of the island at the time. We may 
venture to hope it improved with the presence 
of the good man before referred to — William 
Nelson — and the little company of Methodists, 
whose influence for good could not but be felt in 
a place so closed to the world outside. 

It is, however, more than probable that the visit 
of Charles Wesley gave a stimulus to the religious 
life of the island, and may be reckoned among the 
influences which led to the determination to build 
a new church only a few years later. 

From all we can learn, our ancestors took up 
this laudable work with enthusiasm and unanimity. 
Then, as now, the consideration of ways and 
means was a matter of supreme importance, and I 

34 



YE TABERNACLE AND NEW CHURCH 35 

am able to give in full an account of the way it 
was expected the required funds would be obtained. 

"Whereas at a Vestry held in the Church at Portland on 
Thursday the 30th day of August 1753 to consider the ruinous 
state of the said Church, it was agreed and resolved by the 
Churchwardens and Inhabitants then assembled to nominate 
and appoint John Tucker and Richard Tucker of Weymouth, 
the Rev. Mr. John Cooth, Mr. Edward Pearce and Mr. Copas 
Attwooll together with Mr. Thomas Gilbert Architect of 
Portland Trustees in behalf of the inhabitants of the said 
Island in general to examine such estimates, plans and designs 
as the said Thomas Gilbert might form or prepare either for 
repairing the said old Church or building a new one and to 
make such final determinations thereon as they might judge 
proper. Now we the said Trustees being this 2nd day of 
November 1753 met together for the purpose aforesaid have 
carefully inspected and considered the said Thomas Gilbert's 
survey plans and sections of the said old Church and are 
of opinion that the roof and walls thereof are all in so ruinous 
a condition that it will be extremely imprudent for the 
inhabitants to put themselves to the expense of a thorough 
repair of the same since it appears to us that such repairs 
must cost more than half the expense of building a new 
Church and therefore considering also the dangerous situation 
the said Church now stands in and that it is not sufficient 
to receive half the inhabitants of the Island WE the said 
Trustees think it much more advisable for the inhabitants to 
resolve on building a new Church in a more convenient part 
of the Island capacious enough to receive so many of the said 
inhabitants as may be generally supposed desirous of attend- 



36 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

ing the worship of God and in consequence of the powers 
which we the said Trustees apprehend to be given us we have 
approved of and signed a plan laid before us by the said 
Thomas Gilbert of an extensive and well denned Church 
capable of receiving at least 600 persons to be erected 
at a place called Reforne and that the inhabitants may be 
provided with a convenient place for performing divine 
service in during the building a new Church we have also 
considered a proposal of the said Thomas Gilbert for prepar- 
ing a commodious Tabernacle capable of receiving near as 
many as the old Church in or near the dwelling of the late 
Mr. Cooper at Wakem and to the end that all concerned 
should be at a certainty of the whole expense of building 
such new Church and fitting up such a Tabernacle we have 
agreed with the said Thomas Gilbert for performing the 
whole except ceiling the roof and carriage of the materials 
for the sum of £2100 allowing him liberty to take down at 
his own Charge and to employ such part of the old Church 
except the seats as he thinks necessary or in case of a further 
addition to the proposed steeple according to another design 
then for the sum of £2200 which sum is apprehended by 
taking 4 years time for collecting the same be conveniently 
and easily raised in the following manner : — 

Viz. On every shilling rent 3d. a quarter and so in 
proportion for any greater or less rent for 4 years 
suppose 300 shillings rent will produce £720 

For 200 of the Principal seats to be chosen by lot 3s. 

a quarter for 4 years will produce . 480 

For 200 of the Second seats at 2s. 6d. a quarter 400 

For 200 of the Inferior seats at 2s. a quarter 320 

Out of the present stock of Tunnage 250 



YE TABERNACLE AND NEW CHURCH 37 

The growing stock of Tunnage to be applied towards 
carriage of materials and 'Tis supposed several 
inhabitants who have no rents may not think it 
unreasonable to pay Is. 6d. a quarter for 4 years 
which for 100 such persons 120 

£2290 

And in consideration that the payers to the rents only 
must for ever in future support and maintain the said Church 
when erected we think whatever money may be procured by 
contributions or otherwise should be reckoned one half in 
aid of the first article above mentioned and deducted out of 
the proposed payments on the rents and the other half out of 
the seats. 

These determinations and proposals we the said Trustees 
imagine the inhabitants of the Island in general will cheer- 
fully concur in and by their contributions and otherwise 
zealously promote the carrying on of so laudable a work for 
the benefit of themselves and their posterity and in testi- 
mony and confirmation of these our opinions and final deter- 
minations agreeable to the Trust given us We have hereunto 
set our hands the 2nd day of November 1753. 

Edward Pearce. John Tucker. 

Copas Attwooll. Richard Tucker. 

Thomas Gilbert. John Cooth. 

The following are copies of Mr. Gilbert's 
receipts : — 

The 5th of November 1754 then received by the hands of 
Mr. Edward Fearce and Mr. Copas Attwooll the sum of one 



38 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

hundred pounds being a part of the two hundred and fifty 
pounds appointed by a Vestry held the 30th of August 1753 
to be apply'd first towards the building of a new Church 
within the Island of Portland and to be by them paid as the 
nominated Trustees for that purpose. I say received by me 
the appointed builder of the said new Church. 

£100. Thomas Gilbert. 

The 19th of June 1755 then received by the hands of Mr. 
Edward Pearce and Mr. Copas Attwooll the sum of one 
hundred and fifty pounds being the remainder part of the 
two hundred and fifty pounds by a Vestry held the 30th of 
August 1753 to be apply'd first towards the building of a 
new Church at Eeforne within the Island of Portland and 
to be by them paid as the nominated Trustees for that pur- 
pose. I say received by me the appointed builder of the 
said«new Church. 

£150. j Thomas Gilbert. 

A special Act of Parliament was obtained for 
carrying the above arrangements into effect, and 
from this time the undertaking proceeded ; but the 
old church was in such a ruinous condition that 
service was transferred to the Tabernacle in the 
year 1756. As will be seen by the record copied 
above, this temporary structure, aptly designated by 
our ancestors the " Tabernacle," was erected on the 
house of the late Mr. Edward Cooper at Wakeham. 

Tradition points out the last house at the bottom 



YE TABERNACLE AND NEW CHURCH 39 

of Wakeham Street, on the east side, as the rectory. 
Of course this is a mistake, but I think perhaps it 
was the house referred to in connection with which 
the Tabernacle was erected. 

Mr. Edward Cooper was for many years a 
resident in the island and a man of some position, 
which may be gathered from the fact of his being 
appointed with William Hind as overseer in the 
year 1696. He was one of the largest ratepayers 
in the island, and stood fourth in a rate made 
in the year 1732, as follows: "For every shilling 
rent to pay fourpence, and every share of the Farm 
to pay fourpence, and every twenty sheep to pay 
fourpence, and every Beast to pay twopence." 

John Gilbert stood first, Simon Durrant second, 
and Edward Pearce third. 

For a period of ten years worship was continued 
in the Tabernacle. What appears strange, however, 
in this connection is, that the communion table 
was not kept at the Tabernacle, but carried from 
and returned to the church as required. 

Year after year during these years a payment 
was made of Is., " For carrying ye table to and 
from ye tabernacle concerning ye communion." 



CHAPTEK IV 

YE OLDE CHURCH YARDE 

We cannot but regret that our forefathers found it 
necessary to make such arrangements as led to the 
old church being demolished. It is even now 
one of the most interesting spots in the island, 
and the interest would be very much extended 
were the place accessible to the inhabitants as it 
should be. 

The headstones in the old churchyard represent 
generally the oldest Portland family names — the 
Pearces, Stones, Combens, Attwoolls, and Flews, 
also such names as Andrews, Mitchell, Biett, and 
Pitt. 

Some of the inscriptions are curious, and the 
poetry crude, as may be seen by the following 
examples : — 

40 



YE OLDE CHURCH YARDE 41 

To Abel Flew, who was buried October 25th 

a.d. 1676. 



In life I wroath in stone 
Now life is gone I know 
I shall be raised 
By a stone and B 
Such a stone as giveth 
Living Breath and Saveth 
The Righteous from the 
Second death. 



Another :- 



To Abell, son of Robert and Alese Pearce, who 
died July 25, a.d. 1737. 



Grieve not for me nor be sad, 

The shorter time I lived the fewer sins I had. 



There wore occasional burials in the church 
itself. There are records of three during the last 
twenty-five years of its existence. 

In the year 1732 there is a record of a payment 
of six shillings by Edward Pearce, " for burying his 
mother in the church." In 1747 one "Katrine 
Pearce " was there buried. And it would appear 
that the last person buried in the church before 



42 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

it was abandoned was one Shadrach Stone, in 
1752. For this privilege his friends paid a 
special fee of six shillings and eightpence. 

There is a headstone now standing within the 
precincts of the church which has the following 
inscription : — 

In Memory of Andrew Stone, who departed this life 
30th July 1764, in the 80th year of his age. 

The old church at this time must have been 
greatly dismantled for the building of the new 
one. 

The Edward Pearce just before referred to as 
having paid the fee for burying his mother in the 
church may have been the same whose headstone 
stands in the old churchyard with the following 
inscription : — 

In Memory of Edward Pearce, Superintendent of His 
Majesty's Quarries in Portland, who died the 10th day 
of June 1745. Aged 58 years. 



I never did a slander forge 
My neighbours' Fame to wound 
Nor hearken to a false Report 
By malice whispered round. 




o 

Pi 
& 
W 



o 

M 
O 

P4 



o 
o 

a, 






THE NEW CHURCH OF ST. GEORGE 43 

In the old parish records Edward Pearce is 
frequently referred to as " the Trustee for the 
Parish," and year by year pays over to the church- 
wardens the amount of the church expenses. On 
the 31st January 1742-43 the receipt is to 
Edward Pearce senior, and Edward Pearce junior. 
The name is honoured with the prefix Mr. 

THE NEW CHURCH OF ST. GEORGE 

In due course the new church was sufficiently 
advanced to admit of worship, and on the 29 th 
of July in the year 1766 it was consecrated by 
the Right Rev. Dr. Newton, Bishop of Bristol. 

As may be supposed, this was a year of rejoicing 
for the inhabitants of Portland. 

I am not able to say what the age of the good 
bishop was when he came on this occasion, or 
how his journey was made. We may suppose he 
came in his own carriage as far as the ferry, but 
this was too dangerous a place to be passed in 
state. We believe at this time there was a boat 
kept at the passage, drawn from side to side by a 
rope, but however safe to the islanders, presented 



44 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

a dangerous appearance to a stranger; and we have 
it on record that, at the bishop's request, he was 
carried across this place on the shoulders of some 
of the Portlanders. When on this side, we learn 
Farmer Lowman's plow was hired two days, for 
carrying his lordship to and from the ferry. 

It is probable that there was no properly 
organised choir connected with the church at this 
time, for there is a record of some expense with 
the Wyke singers, who it may be supposed came 
over to assist at the consecration services. 

The new church now consecrated was by no 
jneans finished, and much yet remained to be done. 

Six years after the consecration, the condition 
of the graveyard was found to be so wet as to 
present a new difficulty ; and the following record 
is interesting, affording, as it does, an illustration 
of the old methods by which our fathers managed 
matters of this kind : — 

By virtue of a Vestry appointed by the Churchwardens of 
this Parish for the inhabitants to take into consideration the 
situation of the Churchyard being unwholesome and wet, 
the graves that has been already dug how that at several 
times has been one half full and at other times almost full 
of water not only that but very annoyance and smells from 



THE NEW CHURCH OF ST. GEORGE 45 

the same to the inhabitants and other offences therefrom 
That sometimes such corpses put into the grave almost swim 
by such water, and to remedy such effect and annoyance the 
said Vestry is appointed this 27th Day of February in the 
year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and seventy- 
two 1772 for the inhabitants to consider of the same. 

We the principal as well as other and majority of said 
Vestry so appointed to remedy those effects and annoyances 
therefrom do hereby agree as well for selves and others not 
here present to dig or cause to be digged or made a ditch 
all round the Churchyard of sufficient width and depth in 
order to take off or convey such waters from the said Church- 
yard at a convenient place designed or can hereafter be 
found and we do hereby further agree as well for ourselves 
and others, in order to perform such work and labour in 
digging and covering such ditch in manner following that 
every inhabitant and boy within the Island of Portland able 
to labour shall work and perform this work in 

the Parish and to be warned either by the Constable of the 
Manor or one of his deputies and if any man whatsoever 
neglect or refuse to come to work on such ditch as aforesaid 
he shall hire that day when he so warned to come another 
man in his room and pay two shillings and sixpence per 
day for his not coming to work — And for the better guide 
rule order and direction to perform such a good undertaking 
we do hereby agree to appoint Mr. Daniel Andrews, Mr. 
John Scriven, Mr. William Pearce of Southwell, Mr. Wm. 
Pearce senr. of Easton to level stake mark out such 
ground where such gutters or gutter is to be digged and to 
direct the workmen how wide and deep such gutter is to be 
made and performed. Such workmen to be under their 



46 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

order and direction and after such land for said gutter is 
marked out for two of them only to attend at a time and to 
be paid for their trouble. — And we do farther agree that the 
present or succeeding Churchwardens shall be aiding and 
assisting to the said good undertaking, Wishing and hoping 
for such success. 

In the year 1776, Mr. Thomas Gilbert, the 
architect and builder of the church, died. The 
Gilberts were perhaps the most important family 
in the island during the last century. Their name 
is very old in the island, and can be traced back 
through a period of five hundred years. The 
family residence was that large and well-built 
*house on the top of Fortune's Well Street, now 
belonging to Miss Bower of Weymouth, late in 
the occupation of Mr. George Andrews. 

A Mr. William Gilbert (probably brother of the 
architect) was in the year 1759 bailiff of the 
manor, and the parish authorities paid him " for 
house-room for the arms and clothing of the militia 
of the island." 

Doubtless a kind of soldiery, or volunteer corps, 
has existed in Portland for centuries. We find 
them mentioned as far back as the year 837 
as the " Portland Beleares " or " Slingers." In 



THE NEW CHURCH OF ST. GEORGE 47 

Cromwell's time they resisted for a long time the 
Parliamentary troops. In 1759 they are called 
the "militia," and in 1805 the " Eoyal Portland 
Legion." I have heard them spoken of by some 
of the oldest inhabitants as the " Coast Fencibles." 

I feel I am now going beyond the scope of 
the title of my book, but as there is very much 
that might be written of general interest, and the 
temptation to me is very great, I hope I shall be 
excused this digression. 

Before passing away from the story of the 
building of the new church, I feel bound to refer 
to the name of a family who have had a close 
connection with the interests of this island, and 
which can be traced through a period of over two 
hundred years. I refer to the family of Tucker 
and Steward. I must, however, confine myself at 
present to that part of their connection which is in 
association with our " Page of Church History." 

It will be seen from their being appointed 
trustees of the funds and general carrying out of 
the building of the new church, that John and 
Richard Tucker were in possession of the fullest 
trust and confidence of the islanders. They 



48 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

financed the scheme from the first, and were gener- 
ous supporters by subscriptions. They also obtained 
from friends some handsome donations towards it. 

At the close of the year 1766, after the conse- 
cration of the church, there is a statement of some 
receipts and expenditure by Mr. Eichard Tucker, 
and apparently in his own handwriting, made out 
as follows : — 

The Trustees of Portland Church with Richard Tucker. 
1766. Dr. 

Sept. 2. To cash paid Mr. Kobt. Smith for his 
bill planning and selling the seats 
and for deeds to secure interest of 
money to people who paid off ye 
Trustees £28 5 

To Mr. "Walter Earl's bill for Consecra- 
tion of ye Church 15 16 

Dec. 16. To cash paid ye Churchwardens to 

ballance the account 22 2 2 



£66 3 2 

1766. Cr. 

July 7. By ballance left in my hand at final 

settlement with ye Trustees . £45 3 2 

23. By cash received of Humphrey Sturt, 

Esqre., as a donation to the Church 21 

£66 3 2 



THE NEW CHURCH OF ST GEORGE 49 

Large sums of money were spent upon the 
church after its consecration, and in the year 
1798 the roof was taken down. 

In the year 1780, the name of Tucker is 
merged into Steward. In 1788 Mr. Gabriel 
Steward was appointed governor of the island by 
His Majesty King George the Third. 

He was succeeded in 1791 by Mr. Gabriel 
Tucker Steward. In 1793 this gentleman was 
appointed a trustee of the grant money. 

As security for the large expenditure on the 
roof of the church, the tonnage money due from 
the Stewards, on stone taken by them from the 
common lands, was allowed to remain unpaid 
from the year 1792 to the year 1798. The 
sum thus accumulated (£464, Is. 7d.) was then 
accounted for to the churchwardens. 

Mr. Steward also obtained from the king a 
further donation of £200 towards the church 
expenses. 

During these years, however, Mr. Steward had 
financed the church scheme to the amount of 
£561, 4s., and paid other parish expenses amount- 
ing to £82, 13s. 

4 



SO METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

At the Court Leet held 16th November 1798, 
Mr. Steward rendered an account, and paid over 
the balance of £20, 4s. 7d. 

In addition to the sums referred to above, there 
would appear to have been paid out of the grant 
money by the trustees for the same object, from 
the year 1794 to 1798, considerably over £500. 

Among the items of expenditure are some of 
special interest, as, for instance, £6, 6s. for a coat 
of arms for the church. 

It would not be becoming on my part to 
question the wisdom of the gentlemen in select- 
ing the site for the new church at Keforne. At 
that time it had to serve for the needs of the 
whole island. It seems, however, to-day too much 
removed from the centres of population. This has 
perhaps been a source of weakness to it, especially 
with the many other places of worship erected in 
the very midst of the people. It is, however, 
a splendid specimen of genuine workmanship, and 
as a structure calculated to stand for ages. 



part ffi 



THE ESTABLISHMENT AND GROWTH OF 
METHODISM IN PORTLAND 



CHAPTEE V 

METHODISM ESTABLISHED IN PORTLAND BY 
ME. BBACKENBURY 

We have now reached the period when we must 
refer in detail to the establishment of Methodism 
in Portland. 

Whatever might have been the religious con 
dition of the people whilst William Nelson lived, 
we are obliged to admit it had become very low 
and unsatisfactory at this period. 

In the early part of the year 1791, Methodism, 
which had been gaining a hold all over the country, 
was to receive a very severe shock. John Wesley, 

51 



52 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

who had become such a power in life, had now 
about completed his life's work. Among the little 
company who were privileged to witness the 
departure of the founder and father of Methodism 
was Eobert Carr Brackenbury, Esq., who in writing 
to Dr. Coke, then absent in America, says : — 

I am just come from the solemn scene of our honoured 
father's exit from the regions of mortality. I believe it will 
leave a lasting impression on the minds of all who were 
present. The blessed testimonies he gave, while his strength 
and speech remained, of his faith and hope in the Lord Jesus 
will no doubt be a confirmatory seal to the truths he main- 
tained in the course of his ministry. Oh that all his sons 
in the gospel may prepare to meet him by filling usefully 
their life's short day as he did ! and oh that a double portion 
of his spirit may rest on all 1 

This good man, who had done so much for many 
places (especially Jersey and Guernsey), was just 
now to become closely associated with our own 
island. 

Mr. Brackenbury was the eldest son of Carr 
Brackenbury, Esq., and was born at the family 
estate, Panton House, Lincolnshire, in 1*752. The 
earliest written notice of him is in Mr. Wesley's 
Journal in 1776, where he writes: — 



ESTABLISHED BY MR. BRACKENBURY 53 

I went to Horncastle and to Spilsby with Mr. Bracken- 
bury. While this gentleman was at Cambridge he was con- 
vinced of sin, though not by any outward means, and soon 
after justified. Coming to Hull, he met with one of our 
preachers. By long and close conversation with him he was 
clearly convinced it was his duty to join with the people 
called Methodists : at first, indeed, he staggered at lay 
preaching ; but after weighing the matter more deeply, he 
began preaching himself, and found a very remarkable 
blessing both in his own soul and in his labours. 

The name of Brackenbury is written in the 
history of our country, and shines out with grandeur 
in an age and at a time when good men were few. 
In the year 1483, when Eichard in. had im- 
prisoned his two young nephews in the Tower 
of London, Sir Robert Brackenbury was the 
governor of the Tower, and when Richard required 
him to have these princes murdered he nobly 
refused. 

Shakespeare has put these words into the mouths 
of the Duke of Clarence and Sir R. Brackenbury : — 

Clarence. — Ah, Brackenbury ! I have done the things 
that now give evidence against my soul. Keeper, I pray 
thee sit by me awhile ; my soul is heavy, and I fain would 
sleep. 

Brackenbury. — I will, my lord. God give your grace 
good rest. 



54 METH0DISM IN PORTLAND 

Shortly after Mr. Wesley's death, Mr. Bracken- 
bury, suffering from an infirm state of health, 
partially retired from active labours, and, leaving 
Eaithby Hall, sought repose in the south of England. 

Mrs. Brackenbury has thus described it : — 

About the year 1793 (which was, in fact, the year 1791) 
my beloved husband resolved on one of his " retreats," that 
is, on an entire seclusion of himself from all society, for the 
purposes of constant prayer and holy exercises. Being at 
Southampton, he resolved to take the first coach that drew 
up ; he did so, and it set him down at Weymouth. 

He lived in private lodgings, but the very next day he 
was met by Mr. Blunt of Frome, who instantly said, " Oh, 
sir, you are the very person I wanted : the isle of Portland 
(pointing to it) is all darkness ; you must go there." 

An early writer on this subject has said " that 
Mr. Blunt's statement may seem to some to have 
been exaggerated, but not to those who are ac- 
quainted with the then moral condition of the 
island." 

Some light is thrown on it by Mr. George Smith, 
who was the companion and fellow-labourer of Mr. 
Brackenbury at Portland. He says : — 

Before this period (1791) vice of every kind reigned 
triumphant, and almost without control. A kind of carnival 



ESTABLISHED BY MR. BRACKENBURY 55 

was kept up at one place for a whole fortnight. Labour was 
suspended, and cock-fighting, drunkenness, lewdness, and im- 
morality of every species, with dreadful profaneness, were 
openly practised. 

This, then, being a faithful picture by one who 
saw it, must be allowed to confirm Mr. Blunt's 
statement, " the isle of Portland is all darkness." 
Mr. Smith, in his writings, says : — 

In the month of May 1791 a new scene was presented 
in the openings of Divine Providence. A pious clergyman 
whom I had visited spoke of me in favourable terms to Mr. 
Brackenbury of Raithby, who was desirous of having a young 
man with him in his journeys who might be a helper in the 
work. That gentleman wrote to me at Newark, and I 
presently walked to Raithby Hall in Lincolnshire, where 
I was kindly received. 

In the month of November Mr. Brackenbury 
with Mr. Smith began their united labours in the 
isle of rortland. They found its inhabitants sunk 
in ignorance and wickedness, but they did not 
leave it until the power of the gospel had been 
wonderfully manifested. The exact date when Mr. 
Brackenbury began his labours in the island was 
the 30th of October 1791. This is conHrmed 
by the inscription in the Bibles given by Mrs. 



56 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

Brackenbury to the Sunday scholars, fifty years 
after, to commemorate the event. 



CHAPEL BUILDING AND EARLY METHODISTS 

We are fortunate in being able to obtain much 
information about this visit from a Memoir of 
the death of his father, written in 1833 by Mr. 
William Bramwell Smith. He says : — 

For the first eight or nine months they saw but little 
fruit of their labours, though at this period they were held 
in high estimation by the generality of the people. Mr. 
Braakenbury's kindness to the poor contributed doubtless 
in no small degree to effect this. 

At first they preached in Mr. Brackenbury's own house, 
and when it became incapable of holding half the hearers, 
another was hired at a small distance ; and on the Lord's 
day evenings they were well filled, though Mr. Smith and 
Mr. Brackenbury preached at the same hour. 

As their hearers continued to increase, Mr. Smith suggested 
the propriety of building a chapel. Several difficulties stood 
in the way ; however, it was at length erected. 

They then went forward with increasing success, but were 
at the same time called to endure grievous and long-continued 
persecution. Indeed, the riotous proceedings of the mob were 
carried to such a pitch that they were at length compelled to 
seek protection from the law. 




mi:. brai:kkxbui;y s House 



CHAPEL BUILDING 57 

Two of the ringleaders were convicted of the charges 
brought against them at the Sherborne Quarter Sessions, 
and fined £10 each. Hereby the persecution was restrained, 
and it was afterwards confined to railing and bitter words. 

The Memoir continues : — 

The children were first instructed on Saturday afternoons, 
and when any were perceived to be under good impressions, 
they were put into a separate class, that more particular 
directions might be given to them. We had cause of thank- 
fulness to God that our labour in this respect was not in vain. 
Several months elapsed from the period of their arrival before 
those who they hoped had been profited by their ministry 
were collected into a separate Society from the rest, because 
we wished to have proof of their sincerity, and that they also 
should count the cost and weigh the consequences before 
they entered into so solemn an engagement. And when at 
length a religious Society was formed, no persons were ad- 
mitted into it who did not promise to renounce all sinful 
practices, and especially that which on their arrival in the 
island very generally prevailed, the practice of smuggling. 
The means which the blessed God was pleased in His infinite 
wisdom to make use of for the deliverance of souls from the 
bondage of Satan, and their introduction into the glorious 
liberty of the children of God, was the plain preaching of the 
word, including the fall and recovery of man in the way and 
manner which the Methodist preachers everywhere adopt. 

Other things contributed to the welfare of the Society. 
Among these were the class meetings and daily visitation 
from house to house, and especially the counsels and example 
of Mr. Brack enbury's housekeeper, Mrs. Pershard. She 



58 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

was a woman of great humility, undissembled integrity, 
and extraordinary discernment in the things of God, though 
scarcely able to write or read. The number of persons who 
deserted the enemy's camp and declared openly for the Lord 
was about one hundred and twenty. 

By a good Providence there have been preserved 
a number of documents and papers, some of which 
have come down from the hands of Mr. Bracken- 
bury himself. By these we are able, to some 
extent, to trace in detail the steps of these good 
men in the island. 

We learn they arrived on the 30 th October 1791. 
They had no sooner taken a dwelling-house than they 
used it for preaching and other religious services. 

Just over five months after their arrival, Mr. 
Brackenbury secured by purchase a field upon 
which, in the same year, he built a chapel. This 
property was sold to Mr. Brackenbury by a Mrs. 
Agnes Attwooll, widow of William Attwooll, 
mariner, by church gift bearing date the 12th of 
April 1792. 

Immediately following the erection of the chapel 
a dwelling-house was also erected. Both these old 
buildings are standing to-day at Fortune's Well, 
although both have been since enlarged. 



CHAPEL BUILDING 59 

In the chapel is a tablet with the following 
inscription : — 

This Tablet is erected to the Memory of 

ROBERT CARR BRACKENBURY 

of Raithby Hall 

in the County of Lincoln, Esquire 

designed not as the record 

of his eminently holy life 

successful labours in the Christian Ministry 

extensive beneficence 

and faithful uniform imitation of his 

Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ : 

but as a sincere memorial 

of the grateful esteem, filial affection 

and deep regret of a poor people 

whose forlorn condition 

excited his tenderest compassion 

and to whom 

as the humble and devoted servant of God 

he first imparted the Gospel 

of their Salvation 

and continued at all times their kindest 

Benefactor, Friend and Teacher 

until he entered the joy of his Lord 

August 11th, 1818. 

This Chapel was built 1792 at his sole expense 

for the benefit of the present 

and succeeding generations 

who shall arise and call him blessed. 

" He shall be had in everlasting remembrance." 



60 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

Before, however, the chapel was built, we learn 
from Mr. Smith's Memoir, already quoted from, that 
in addition to Mr. Brackenbury's house at Fortune's 
Well, " another house was hired at a small distance." 

We are able to give some particulars of this from 
the order of the Court of Shaston confirming the 
licence for preaching in this house, obtained by Mr. 
Brackenbury from the Bishop of Bristol. 

This document is still in existence, and the 
following is a copy : — 

Dorsetshire. — At the General Quarter Sessions of the Peace 
of our Lord the King held at Shaston in and for the County 
of Dorset, on Tuesday the Tenth Day of July in the Thirty 
Second Year of the Keign of our Sovereign Lord George the 
Third by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France, and 
Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, and so forth ; and in 
the Year of our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and 
Ninety Two before Anthony Chapman, Chairman, David 
Robert Michel Esquires and others Justices of our said Lord 
the King, assigned to keep the Peace of our said Lord the 
King, in and for the County aforesaid ; and also to hear and 
determine divers Felonies, Trespasses, and other Misde- 
meanours done or perpetrated in the same County. 

At this Court was brought a Certificate, That an House in 
the Occupation of Mary Mitchell, widow, situate in the 
Village of Wakeham in the Island of Portland in the 
County of Dorset, is set apart for the Public Worship of God 










pq 

1-1 
i— i 

1= 
w 

cc 
P 
O 

« 

'a3 
H 

03 

a 
n 



o 

m 
a 

H 



CHAPEL BUILDING 61 

by a Congregation of Dissenting Protestants called Methodists, 

and it was desired this Court would file and record the same. 

Ordered— That the same be filed and recorded accordingly 

By the Court. 
Examined by John "Wallis, Clerk of the Peace. 

There is a similar document granted by the 
Court of Blandford on the 15th of January 1793 
for Mr. Brackenbury's house at Fortune's Well, which 
is no doubt the chapel. Mr. Brackenbury had not 
only given himself to this godly work, but had 
consecrated his great wealth as well. 

On the 12th of April 1794, Mr. Brackenbury 
purchased a dwelling-house at Wakeham, in the 
occupation of John Thorner, by church gift from 
Peter Vine, and on the 29th of the same month a 
licence was obtained from the Court of Sherborne, 
and the services were transferred from the hired 
house at Wakeham to this. In the year 1794 
Mr. Brackenbury left Portland, and returned to his 
family house, Eaithby Hall. From this time a 
regular succession of ministers have been appointed. 
In the year 1794 the Revs. John Easton and 
William Holmes were appointed. 

Blandford was the same year made the head of 
a circuit embracing Portland, Weymouth, Poole, 



62 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

Longfleet, Ham, Monckton, West Morden, East 
Morden, Povington, Grange or Creech, Swanage, 
Blandford, and Lytchett. 

There is preserved in the minister's house at 
Fortune's Well the original list of members recorded 
by the Eev. W Holmes and other ministers in this 
Blandford Circuit. As I feel sure there are the 
descendants of these first Methodists who will be 
interested to find the names of their ancestors, I 
venture to give the whole in an Appendix as 
recorded in this document. We regret that in 
the first two years the names of the members in 
Portland and Weymouth are not included. I 
think this may be explained by supposing these 
places were still more in the hands of Mr. 
Brackenbury than the minister's. 

I have no doubt but that the study of the 
Register of Names will lead many to endeavour to 
trace their descent from those who were members 
over a hundred years ago. There are those who 
will remember some of them, and, apart from 
family relations, there is an interest attaching to a 
study of them. 

In the first year's list of the Portland members, 



EARLY METHODISTS 63 

1797, will be noted the name of Agnes Attwooll, 
a member of Mary Angel's class, who was probably 
the person who sold the land referred to before. 
And the name of Jenny Vine as a leader. She 
must have belonged to the family of Peter Vine 
who sold the house at Wakeham to Mr. Brackenbury, 
as there was only one family of this name in the 
island at this time. Other names, too, I must 
single out for special notice, because they took such 
a prominent part in the life and growth of Methodism 
in the island — the names of Marwood, Angel, 
Russell, Read, and Whittle. 

One other to which I must give prominence is 
that of Sarah Wiggatt, but known among us for a 
period of nearly sixty years as Mrs. Gibbs. In the 
year 1793 Sarah Wiggatt (afterwards Mrs. Wm. 
Gibbs) was admitted into the Society, most probably 
by Mr. Brackenbury himself. I cannot do better 
than to quote at length the obituary notice which 
appeared in the Methodist Magazine for 1861, p. 960, 
respecting this grand old Methodist: — 

August 2nd, 1861, died at Portland, Sarah Gibbs, aged 85, 
relict of Mr. William Gibbs. Among the first fruits of the 
labours of R. C. Brackenbury, Esquire, in the island, she, with 



64 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

her revered husband, stood the test of the persecution during 
the stormy day. They ranked also among the closest and 
latest correspondents of Mrs. Brackenbury. 

Mrs. Gibbs became impressed by the truth at the age of 
seventeen, and united herself to the Church in 1793. In 
1810 she was appointed leader of a class, which office she 
filled with fidelity and assiduity, securing the esteem and 
admiration of those who were entrusted to her care. 

In her humble cottage the ministers were cheerfully and 
hospitably entertained, and no visitor received a more hearty 
welcome. 

In her deportment she was a fine specimen of primitive 
godliness — plain in dress, unassuming in carriage, cheerful in 
disposition, liberal in her acts of kindness, a keeper at home, 
a peacemaker, yea, an Israelite indeed. 

During her final affliction she was most anxious to glorify 
God by patient submission. "When the wheels of life had 
become nearly still, she raised her hand and whispered, " Oh, 
let me catch a smile from Thee, and drop into eternity." 

The descendants of this good person still cherish 
many relics which have come down from her and 
her husband, and among them an old class paper 
of hers before class books were introduced, and you 
may recognise among the names some whom you 
have known — although bear in mind they were 
members over seventy years ago. 

1820. Sarah Gibbs, Leader : — Mary Scholar, Elizabeth 
Fuzzard, Sarah Allen, Susannah Pearce, Susanna Allen, 



EARLY METHODISTS 65 

Mary Wingate, Susanna Angel, Alice Winter, Susanna White, 
Elizabeth Sansom, Ann Davis, Ann Dryer, Sarah Fry, Sarah 
Sansom, Grace Angel, Elizabeth Mills. 

In the old parish vestry records for the year 
1791, I find Mr. Wm. Gibbs was a churchwarden; 
but shortly after this an entry is made in the same 
book of a church meeting at which it is decided 
to repair the roof of the church at an estimated 
cost of £300. This being a large undertaking, the 
principal parishioners sign the book in support of 
the undertaking, but Mr. Gibbs' name is not 
among them. We have evidence that he had 
thus early joined the New Society ; and when 
he died, the Rev. John Manning, the clergyman 
in charge, refused to preach a funeral sermon for 
him. 

His son, to whom we have previously referred, 
and other good Methodists, felt much grieved at 
this, and it was this incident which led principally 
to the laying out the land adjoining the chapel at 
Fortune's Well as a graveyard. 

Charles Whittle, too, is very early found connected 
with the Society, and is soon honoured with the 
esteem and confidence of Mr. Brackenbury. As 

5 



66 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

far back as the year 1799, we find him receiving 
letters and money for the good of the poor of the 
island and the Society from Mr. Brackenbury. 
One dated February 7th, 1800, I think will be 
interesting if given in full. 

Dear Brother, — It is some months since I had the 
pleasure of hearing from you, and I acknowledge myself 
faulty in not answering your letter. As I have not brought 
it from home, I do not recollect the particulars thereof, only 
that your own soul was prosperous, and several likewise of 
the Society, but that others were grown slack. This is 
generally the case ; the light is not to every one the power, 
and numbers settle in decency of outward conduct, observing 
the exterior of religion, while the inward life and spirituality 
of it are left behind. But blessed be God it is not so with 
all ; those who walk in the path of self-denial, combating 
their passions and watching unto prayer, preserve a savour of 
life and grace in their vessels, and are known of the Lord by 
the daily tokens of His love, which He kindly affords them, 
and by the fresh supplies of daily strength to help them on 
their journey. And this is by as certain a rule as the earth 
is rendered fruitful by painful labour and industry on the 
part of man, and by the genial heat and refreshing showers 
of the heavens. 

Enclosed I have sent you a £10 bill, which you will please 
dispose of as you did that the last winter among our poor 
friends. I wish it had come sooner, since they must have 
suffered greatly for want of bread and coals. However, as 
their necessities are yet, I fear, for the most part unsupplied, 



EARLY METHODISTS 67 

I hope the present remittance will be found a seasonable 
relief. 

You will not forget to send me word as soon as you receive 
this, without waiting to distribute it, and direct your answer 
to me at Mr. Ancoats, Retford, Nottinghamshire, where we 
are going to-morrow, and shall spend a week with our friends. 
Afterwards, we intend, God willing, to visit part of Yorkshire, 
and then proceed by Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, and 
Bucks, to London ; but whether we shall reach to Portland on 
this journey is very uncertain. "We have no carriage or servant 
with us, and therefore are obliged to hire post-chaises, which 
at this time are very dear. Indeed, this part of England 
suffers greatly, and is likely to suffer more before the next 
harvest, from the great scarcity of corn both for man and beast. 
The hay likewise is very indifferent, and it is not, I suppose, 
very much better with you. Surely the Lord is coming near 
to judgment against a sinful land, and if we do not "hear the 
rod " we may fear more dreadful strokes than we have hitherto 
experienced. 

I sent Brother Kelk £20 to Poole, which I understood he 
received, and which he said he should acknowledge, but to my 
great surprise I have not received a single line from him, 
though it is almost two months ago. 

Through Divine mercy we are both tolerably well, and 
humbly desirous of being directed, governed, and blest by our 
Great Master in His work. 

We entered on the New Year with renewed dedication of 
ourselves to God, and we hope to see still more glorious 
displays of His wisdom, power, and goodness in regard both 
to ourselves and others ; but above all we wish to lie low, 
even in the dust, before Him, this being the temper most 



68 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

pleasing to the Lord, and most becoming creatures and sinners 
that can call nothing their own but ignorance and weakness, 
but deformity and defilement. 

Our kind love to friends as if mentioned by name. Mrs. 
B. joins with me in love to Sister Green, and thankfully 
acknowledges her last kind favour, which she intends to 
answer. Our love likewise to Mr. and Mrs. Kelk. 

Suppose you have heard of young Mr. Green, who laboured 
among you two years ago. He died at Bath of brain-fever. 
His end was peace. 

Remember me kindly to your mother and dear family. — 
I remain, dear brother, your friend and servant in the Lord, 

R. C. Brackenbury. 

P.S. — You will not forget to acknowledge the receipt of 
this as soon as possible, and let me know how the Society fares 
both in temporals and spirituals. 

The young minister referred to in Mr. Bracken- 
bury's letter was the Rev. Robert Green, who was 
appointed with Robert Smith junior and Mark 
Daniels to the Poole Circuit in 1797 

In this year Poole was made the head of a cir- 
cuit which included Portland. In 1805, however, 
this honour was conferred upon Weymouth, and 
Portland formed part of the Weymouth Circuit up 
to the year 1857. 

During our connection with Weymouth one 
minister always resided at Portland, and in the 



LOCAL PREACHERS 69 

house close by the chapel, which was also erected 
and furnished at Mr. Brackenbury's expense. 

It is impossible not to perceive the great attach- 
ment Mr. Brackenbury had to Portland, and how 
deeply we are indebted to him for our existence as 
a Society. 

LOCAL PREACHERS 

From 1791 to 1794 Mr. Brackenbury and Mr. 
Smith were resident in Portland, and from that 
time to the present a regular succession of 
ministers have been appointed. We must not, 
however, forget that from the first the Methodist 
Church everywhere was greatly indebted to that 
body of earnest men to whose labours Portland, in 
common with all other places where Methodism 
has been established, owes a lasting debt of grati- 
tude. 

There sprang up, as it were, with Methodism, a 
select band of local preachers like John Haine, who 
was born at Shaftesbury, and who played an im- 
portant part in early Methodist labour. 

We may gather from Lives of Early Methodist 



70 MET-HODISM IN PORTLAND 

Preachers facts of great interest concerning such 
men. 

John Thicks, too, was another, and we have a 
most interesting account of him in Methodism in 
Dorset. It says : — 

One Saturday morning in the winter of 1806, this good 
man set out from Langton, in the island of Purbeck, to walk 
to Portland, a distance of twenty-five miles. The ground 
was covered with snow, and the roads almost impassable. A 
sharp, icy wind, whetted into bitter keenness by its passage 
over the sea, cut the face of the sturdy pedestrian. He, 
however, struggled on, losing his way sometimes, but never 
daunted. At last, hungry and almost frozen, he arrived at 
Weymouth, and went to the Superintendent's house. Here 
lie found dinner on the table, but so great was his modesty, 
that to every request to partake he answered, " No, thank 
you," and sat watching with the resolution of a martyr the 
demolition of a fillet of veal. In the afternoon he started 
from Weymouth, leaving the cheerful fire and snug room for 
the snow and bitter winds that had waited for him as a prey ; 
and so down to the ferry, and across in the ferry-boat to 
Portland. That little ferry-boat, afterwards the object of 
much interest to belated local preachers, when notwithstand- 
ing their wildest hallooing it persisted in staying on the 
wrong side of the channel. 

To such men as John Thicks, Methodism will 
ever be indebted ; and it is gratifying to know that 
the noble lineage of local preachers has not died 



LOCAL PREACHERS 71 

out, but that they are even to-day a mighty army, 
doing valiant service for the churches. 

On the Thursday evening following the evening 
when my paper was read, Mr. Ed. Webber, in 
his lecture on " John Wesley and his Hymn Book," 
gave some very interesting particulars concerning 
Methodist local preachers, and it is with his very 
kind permission that I am able to repeat those par- 
ticulars here. 

Mr. Webber said: — 

It was stated in an address given in City Road Chapel 
last summer by Mr. Owen Clough, F.R.G.S., F.S.S., etc., 
President of the Local Preachers' Aid Association, that in the 
Wesleyan Methodist Society the local preachers are eight 
times as many as the travelling preachers. Out of every 
seven services taken throughout the country in Methodism, 
five are taken by local preachers. This refers to the old 
Body. There are 5500 pulpits dependiDg every Sunday on 
local preachers. What would it cost Methodism to supply 
these services ? I will put a local preacher's services as worth 
five shillings a sermon. And I may say that is the estimate 
many people put upon them. That would be a cost to 
Methodism of £2750 per Sunday, or £143,000 for the year. 
If you take the whole of the Methodist Churches, viz. the 
old Body in England and Ireland, the Methodist New Con- 
nexion, the Primitive Methodist, the Bible Christians, the 
Methodist Free Church, and the Methodist Reform Union, 
including those on trial and supernumeraries, there are 3920 



72 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

ministers, while local preachers are 39,972. These figures do 
not, of course, include foreign missionaries, but give a propor- 
tion of ten local preachers to one itinerant minister. 

It would perhaps be impossible to estimate cor- 
rectly the value of the labours of this body of men. 
Their services in the pulpits by no means repre- 
sent the whole of their work. It is perhaps no 
exaggeration to say that without them the Methodist 
Church could not have attained its present dimen- 
sions and power, nor performed the great work 
which is her glory. 



MORE BRACKENBURY LETTERS 

At the period just referred to, when John Thicks 

walked from Langton to fulfil an appointment, the 

Eev. Samuel Woolmer was stationed at Portland, 

and I have been favoured through the kindness of 

Mr. George Stampe, of Great Grimsby, with an 

original letter of Mr. Brackenbury's to this good 

minister, dated 14th October 1806. 

It reads thus : — 

Raithby Hall. 
Dear Brother,— It gave us great satisfaction to hear of 
your appointment to the Weymouth Circuit in the place of 



MORE BRACKENBURY LETTERS 73 

our valuable friend Mr. Henshaw, and your kind letter of the 
27th ult., informing of the prosperous state of the Circuit, 
was highly acceptable. No doubt the contrast is great 
between the simple rustic manners of the Society in Portland 
and the more refined manners of Stroud, but their genuine 
piety will, I hope, in some measure compensate for 
the deficiency, and render what would otherwise wear the 
aspect of a desert pleasant and delightful as the garden of 
the Lord. 

I have enclosed a bill, £20, which will go towards defraying 
the annual expenses in Portland. I used to contribute some- 
thing towards "Weymouth, but that I must withdraw, as it is 
pretty well able to support itself. 

My customary allowance to Portland is £30 per annum, 
which I purpose to continue ; and if any part of the old 
furniture in the house wants replacing with better, hope to be 
able to do so in the spring. 

I fear we shall not have it in our power to visit Portland 
this year ; but be assured, my dear Brother, it will give us 
peculiar pleasure to spend a few weeks in your agreeable 
company, and in that of Sister Woolmer, when Divine 
Providence shall again conduct us to that favoured spot. 

It will always be extremely gratifying to us to hear of 
your increasing prosperity, and more especially at Poole, on 
which place much labour has been bestowed with little pros- 
pect of success, till this late favourable gale of Divine 
influence. 

What encouragement does such a gracious visitation afford 
to the faithful labourer to sow and thresh in hope, tho' for the 
present he may discover small fruit of his labour ! 

I should have paid more early attention to your very 



74 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

welcome letter, but could not procure a bill sooner. Please 
to acknowledge the receipt of it when convenient. You need 
not be under any apprehension of its being returned, as 
happened to one or two drawn by my agent in favour of 
Brother Henshaw. 

Be so good as to present our very affectionate regards to 
the Society in Portland. And I remain, my dear Brother, 
with cordial love and esteem, your unworthy fellow-helper 
in the work of ye Lord, R. C. Brackenbury. 

P.S. — Present us affectionately to your beloved Partner. 
Mrs. B. also begs you will accept her kindest remembrance. 
Our love to your colleagues." 

All the information we are able to gather of the 
early days of Methodism in Portland is inseparable 
from the name of Mr. Brackenbury. 

This good gentleman, with his excellent wife, 
spent much of their time at Portland, visiting it 
almost every year, and frequently spending much 
time here. Sometimes they came all the way in 
their own carriage. 

Writing to a friend at Freshford, Wiltshire, 
August 14th, 1812, Mr. Brackenbury says: — 

Mr. Dermott, you have probably heard, is appointed to 
Portland. May the Lord of the harvest bless his labours 
abundantly both there and at Weymouth ! 



MORE BRACKENBURY LETTERS 75 

Since the sitting of Conference we have been favoured with 
several letters from our worthy friend Mr. Dermott. 

Thirteen preachers died the last year, and thirty-two were 
admitted into full connexion ; but what seemed most to 
gladden the hearts of the brethren, and cause many thanks- 
givings to God, was the good news that the Bill in Parliament 
granting full toleration to Methodists and Dissenters had 
passed agreeably to their wishes, and that a more open door 
for preaching the Word is now set before them than they 
ever enjoyed before. 



CHAPTER VI 

SUPERSTITION AND TROUBLE 

About three or four years after this, a circumstance 
of very serious importance happened to the little 
Society at Portland. It was about the year 1816, 
when the Rev. Francis Derry was at Portland. 

Superstition and the belief in witchcraft had so 
possessed the minds of the people, and among them 
several of the most prominent members of the 
Methodists, that indeed very serious injury was 
being done through this belief. Almost every event 
was supposed to be regulated by this evil power, 
and every misfortune was attributed to the witch. 

It does appear that a firm policy was necessary 
to deal with this mischievous superstition, but we 
are obliged to question the wisdom of the high- 
handed treatment it received at the hands of Mr. 
Derry. 

76 



SUPERSTITION AND TROUBLE 77 

It would seem that he personally interrogated 
each member in the classes, and if they admitted 
their belief in witchcraft, he instantly struck their 
names off the Class Eegister, and thus about fifty 
were turned out of the Society. Among these were 
Charles Whittle and Robert Hinde, leaders and 
local preachers, and many prominent members — all 
of whom were most sincere and godly persons. 

Men like Charles Whittle and Robert Hinde 
could not remain idle, and although thrust out of 
the church of their choice, felt that they must find 
employment in some other portion of the Lord's 
vineyard. 

The result was the foundation of a new church, 
which had its centre at Chiswell; and ultimately 
a chapel was built. For years this went by the 
name of " Conjurer's Lodge," and much bitterness 
of feeling was experienced. 

Although this church had so peculiar an origin, 
we are pleased to know it has been owned of God 
as the centre of much useful labour. 

For ten years these good men laboured as 
preachers and workers for God in this new sphere ; 
but at length wiser and kindlier counsels prevailed, 



78 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

and the longed-for welcome was extended to them, 
which they gladly embraced and returned. 

In the good providence of God the Eev. James 
Dunbar was appointed to Portland. And the 
friends who had felt the strain and burden of 
sustaining the Society in the meantime, took 
counsel with this very active and zealous minister, 
and ultimately Mr. and Mrs. Gibbs, with Mr. 
Dunbar, attended the Bristol Conference, for the 
purpose of consulting how best to effect a recon- 
ciliation. This happy event was ultimately brought 
about by the kindly assistance of Mrs. Brackenbury 
and Squire Roberts, who had for many years been 
a close friend of Mr. Brackenbury. 

We are indebted to the good Mr. Wm. Lowman, 
late of Southwell, for an account of this happy 
incident, as we are for very much interesting 
information respecting the early days of the present 
century. 

Mr. Lowman records that on the 3rd of July 1826, Mrs. 
Brackenbury invited all the scholars of the Sunday schools 
to take tea in the yard at the back of the minister's house. 

After the tea, two meetings were held— one of the young 
people and female members of the Society, which Mrs. 
Brackenbury addressed, taking as her subject "Love Letters," 



SUPERSTITION AND TROUBLE 79 

and said the 13th, 14th, and 15th chapters of St. John were 
choice love letters. 

The other and more important gathering was a special 
leaders' meeting, to consider the desirability of readmitting 
Charles Whittle and others into Society. Squire Roberts 
gave some wise counsel, and a formal invitation was agreed 
upon, and instantly accepted. 

The next day, July 4th, Squire Roberts preached in the 
Wakeham Chapel, which had at that time not been open 
quite a year. His text was from the 8th chapter of Zechariah, 
20th verse to the end of the chapter : " Thus saith the Lord 
of hosts ; It shall yet come to pass, that there shall come 
people, and the inhabitants of many cities : And the inhabit- 
ants of one city shall go to another, saying, Let us go speedily 
to pray before the Lord, and to seek the Lord of hosts : I 
will go also. Yea, many people and strong nations shall 
come to seek the Lord of hosts in Jerusalem, and to pray 
before the Lord. Thus saith the Lord of hosts ; In those 
days it shall come to pass, that ten men shall take hold out 
of all languages of the nations, even shall take hold of the 
skirt of him that is a Jew, saying, We will go with you ; for 
we have heard that God is with you." 

The following evening, as if to perfect the reconciliation, 
Squire Roberts preached in Charles Whittle's house at 
Southwell from the text : " Now He that hath wrought us 
for the self-same thing is God, who also hath given unto us 
the earnest of the Spirit " (2 Cor. v. 5). 

On the following Saturday, the 8th of July, all the male 
members of Society were entertained at supper by Mrs. 
Brackenbury at the same place as the tea. 

The next day was the Sabbath, and a goodly number had 



80 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

gathered in the chapel at Fortune's "Well. The morning and 
evening services were both taken by this same good gentle- 
man. His text in the morning was taken from the 40th 
chapter of Isaiah, verses 27 and 28 ; and in the evening he 
preached from the words, "And this is life eternal, that 
they might know Thee, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, 
whom Thou hast sent " (John xvii. 3). 

To ratify the union which had been formally made, they 
gathered around the table of the Lord, and such a sight was 
presented as would gladden the hearts of the ministers of the 
largest churches of to-day. One hundred and thirteen partook 
together of the emblems of the Saviour's dying love. Thus 
was brought to an end the unwilling and unhappy separation 
of those whom most admitted were a sincere though mistaken 
people. 

I was curious to know, as perhaps some of my 
readers are, who this gentleman " Squire Eoberts " 
was, and am able to furnish the following informa- 
tion respecting him. He was a gentleman of 
fortune belonging to Bath, but who quite early 
formed a close friendship with Mr. Brackenbury. 
He is referred to by the daughter of Dr. Adam 
Clarke as a man of piety, education, and taste, as 
well as of fortune. Dr. Coke, writing to him in 
1805, says: "For you, my dear sir, I feel greater 
friendship than for any other man on earth, except 
perhaps Mr. Brackenbury." 



SUPERSTITION AND TROUBLE Si 

But we must retrace our steps, for we have made 
a leap over ten years of our Church history. Yes, 
these ten years were years of anxiety and struggle. 
Among the men who had been separated from the 
little Society were those who had been the trusted 
leaders and most zealous workers, and the work 
which had been carried on by them was not 
permitted to cease, but what had been done by 
three or four had now to be done by one. 

It is a joy and inspiration to us to know that 
there were those ready to do it. There might have 
been seen good old James Wallis going straight 
from the quarry to Fortune's Well to meet one of 
the four classes which had now fallen to his lot to 
lead , and good old Mr. Dine and Mr. Marwood, 
Robert Mitchell, Richard Cook, John Andrews, 
Robert Hoskins, and others, with younger men too, 
who had each their share of work. 

Notwithstanding the trouble which this separation 

caused, a revival broke out, commencing at Southwell. 

Here, where there was a Sunday school held in the 

house of Charles Whittle, the help of this good 

man was indeed missed. Mr. Robert Mitchell was 

appointed superintendent, and the school was held 

6 



82 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

in old Betty Hinde's cottage. It was, however, 
afterwards transferred to Wakeham. Hitherto the 
services at Southwell had been held in Charles 
Whittle's house, but through the unpleasant 
separation just now referred to, this became no 
longer possible. Other steps were immediately 
taken, and after temporary arrangements we find 
an application was made by the Eev. William 
Worth to the Lord Bishop of Bristol, and on 
January 9th, 1818, a dwelling-house at Southwell, 
in the occupation of William Pearce, was duly 
registered for religious worship. 

SUNDAY SCHOOLS AND LIBRARY 

One of the most interesting " finds " which has 
come to my hand was given me by one of Mr. 
J. J. Patten's workmen (Mr. Stickland) since my 
paper was read. It was found behind the chimney 
corner in the old " Punch Bowl " public-house, 
which has recently been rebuilt. It is a print of 
what doubtless was the announcement of the 
Sunday school anniversary services and hymns 
for the year 1819. 



SUNDAY SCHOOLS AND LIBRARY 83 

The name written upon it is " Mary White," who 
was a scholar in the Wesleyan Methodist Sunday 
school at the time, and whose parents kept the 
" Punch Bowl." It is interesting, and an evidence 
of the good work of Methodism in Portland, to 
know that among our church members and workers 
to-day are found her grandchildren and great- 
grandchildren. 

As the information this paper contains is reliable, 

and gives the number of Sunday scholars, and 

perhaps the only proof of the existence of any 

Sunday school and library in Portland at this 

date, I think I cannot do better than give it here 

in full. 

On Sunday 22 August 1819 

A Sermon will be preached 

in the Methodist Chapel, Portland 

By the Rev. William Worth, 

For the benefit of the Sunday School established 

there, and at Southwell. 

A Catechism and several Hymns will be repeated 

by the Children. 

Service to commence at six in the evening. 

The number of children at the Chapel is 156, and at 
Southwell 50. 

A Library is established chiefly for the use and benefit of 
the School. The children which arc recommended for 



84 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

diligence and good behaviour have access to the Library 
gratis ; this, it is expected, will be a more extensive and 
permanent benefit than the giving them books as rewards — 
a practice which is thereby in a great measure superseded. 

Hymns to be Sung by the Children 

In cheerful songs of grateful praise, 
We would our feeble voices raise, 
And celebrate with one accord 
The goodness of our gracious Lord. 

Great God ! Thy love, Thy matchless love, 
Is sung by all Thy saints above ; 
And we Thy children here below, 
The greatness of that love would show. 

Our lives are guarded by Thy care, 
Our feet preserved from every snare, 
Our minds directed to the road 
That leads to virtue and to God. 

'Tis by the guidance of Thy hand, 
"We in Thy awful presence stand, 
And oft within Thy house appear, 
Thy word to hear, and join in prayer. 

For these our generous patrons too, 
We would our grateful thanks renew ; 
O may each infant mind they rear, 
Thy precepts love, Thy name revere. 



SUNDAY SCHOOLS AND LIBRARY 85 

And when that awful day shall come, 
That Thou, great God, shalt call us home, 
May we with these Thy servants join, 
To sing Thy praise in hymns divine ! 

Chorus 
To God the Father, God the Son, 
And God the Spirit, Three in One, 
Be honour, praise, and glory given, 
By all on earth, and all in heaven. 



hear, Thou great Supreme ! 

The artless notes we raise ; 

While angels swell the theme, 

In far sublimer lays, 
Fain would our souls in praise ascend, 
To bless the helpless orphan's Friend. 

On His bright throne above, 
He hears the mourner's sigh ; 
With soft paternal love 
He wipes the streaming eye ; 
And to relieve the bosom's smart, 
Plants pity in the human heart. 

From that rich fountain flow 

The mercies to us given ; 

Protected here below, 

And trained for bliss in heaven, 
Our earliest days His gifts proclaim, 
And call us to adore His name. 



86 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

Oh may each gen'rous friend 

In blessing us be blest ! 

May peace their steps attend 

To that eternal rest 
Where every brow a crown shall grace, 
And Hallelujahs fill the place. 

Chorus 

Oh may this glorious work 

Be crown'd with great success ! 

May thousands yet unborn, 

This institution bless ! 
So shall thy praise be sounded high, 
Throughout a vast eternity. 

The Methodist Sunday schools were the first in 
the island. The school at this time at Wakeham 
(which was a branch of the Fortune's Well School) 
was held in old Jan Thorner's cottage. There are 
those to-day who can remember Jan Thorner, but 
it may be news to some to hear that he died at 
Weymouth at the age of one hundred and three 
years, and was brought back to Portland to be 
buried. 

This cottage at Wakeham was the house referred 
to as purchased by Mr. Brackenbury in 1794, and 
was the home of the first Sunday school on the 
Hill. 




PICTUBH FROM THE OLD CHUECH BIBLE. 
( From a Photograph by Mr. W Pangbourne.) 



MR. BRACKENBURY'S DEATH 87 



MR. BRACKENBURY'S DEATH AND LEGACIES 

"In the summer of 1818 it became apparent 
to the friends of Mr. Brackenbury that the close 
of his useful life was rapidly approaching. For 
the last three years the Rev. John Keeling as a 
faithful friend had shared in the pious care of 
ministering to this good man, and had been as a 
son in the gospel and a member of the family. 
In his last illness, reclining on the arm of his 
faithful friend, he somewhat suddenly sank at his 
seat, Raithby Hall, on the 11th of August 1818, 
aged sixty -six years. As is fully shown, his whole 
man — body, soul and spirit — was one oblation to 
God; while his wealth was always used by him as 
a trust devoted to the good of the cause which 
was so dear to his heart — the extension and pro- 
sperity of the work of God." 

It is more than probable that had this good 
man been in sufficient health to pay his usual visits 
to Portland during the last three years of his life, 
his influence might have prevented the separation 
and dissension just now referred to. 



88 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

Although he had not been able to come to 
Portland for some time, he had not forgotten his 
friends there. Even when he was passing away, 
he left perhaps his most precious legacy to his dear 
friend at Portland, Mr. William G-ibbs. That 
legacy was his pocket Bible, from which he read 
his first text when he came to preach the gospel 
at Portland, twenty-seven years before. 

On the occasion of our celebration we were 
privileged to have the loan of this Bible by the 
family, who prize it very much indeed. 

On the fly-leaf of this precious book is written 
by his own hand a little poem or prayer, which if 
sincerely uttered might be appropriately recited by 
all of us before reading God's word. 

THE POEM 

"R. C. Brackenbury" 

guide my judgment, guide my taste, 
Sweet Spirit, Author of the Book, 
Of wonders told in language chaste 
And plainness not to be mistook. 

Oh, let me muse, and yet at sight 
The page acknowledge all Divine, 



MR. BRACKENBURY'S DEATH 89 

Let there be light, and there was light, 
Let man in God's own image shine. 

Who his soul's rapture can refrain, 
At Joseph's ever-pleasing tale, 
Of marvels the prodigious train, 
To Sinai's Hill from Goshen's Vale. 

The psalmist and proverbial seer, 
And all the prophets, sons of song, 
Make all things precious, all things clear, 
And bear the brilliant word along. 

Oh, take the book from off the shelf, 
Peruse it meekly on thy knees, 
Best panegyric on itself, 
And self avouched to teach and please. 

Respect, adore it, heart and mind, 
How greatly sweet, how sweetly grand ; 
Who reads the most is most refined, 
And polished by the Master's hand. 

Mr. Brackenbury was the author of several 
small works. Among them, a Book of Poems, The 
Holy Angels, Sacred Poetry and Hymns in the 
Principal Histories of the Old and New Testament. 
He also revised a hymn-book originally written 
by William Cruden, and added two hymns of his 



9 o METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

own to this collection. A few of these hymn- 
books still remain in the island. I have one which 
is in an excellent state of preservation. 

There is another old book in my possession upon 
which I set especial value, not having seen another 
like it. It contains the Church Service ; the form 
and manner of making and ordaining of Superinten- 
dents, Elders, and Deacons ; twenty-five Articles of 
Eeligion ; the General Minutes of the Conferences 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church in America, 
forming the constitution of the said Church ; and a 
Collection of Psalms and Hymns. Published by John 
and Charles Wesley. Printed in the year 1791. 

It is probable this book was brought to Portland 
by Mr. Brackenbury and presented to some one of 
the early Methodists here. 

Immediately after her husband's death, Mrs. 
Brackenbury transferred the chapel and dwelling- 
house at Fortune's Well, and also the "School 
House " at Wakeham, to the Society. The deeds of 
this transfer bear the following dates : May 8th, 
1819, a lease of the properties, and on the 29th 
of the same month the sale or transfer for the sum 
of ten shillings to the following trustees : — 



MR. BRACKENBURY'S DEATH 91 

William Gibbs, Easton, Farmer. 

John Marwood, „ Cordwainer. 

Francis Pearce, „ „ 

John Dine, „ Blacksmith. 

John Andrews, „ Quarryman. 

William Wallis, „ „ 

Henry Stone, „ „ 

Robert Pearce the younger, Fortune's Well, Taylor. 

Benjamin Fuzzard, Fortune's Well, Mason. 

Edward Allen, Chisel, Master Mariner. 

John Angel, „ „ 

Robert Pearce the elder, Chisel, Gentleman. 

Thomas Flew, Chisel, Grocer. 

Abraham Mills, Chisel, Baker. 

Fortunately for us as Methodists, Mrs. Bracken- 
bury, who had for many years been the earnest 
and loving co-worker with her husband, had also 
acquired a most sincere regard and affection for 
Portland. She is referred to in Memoirs of 
Raithhy Hall in the following terms : — 

This lady was a person of singular piety, much strength 
of mind, and unwearied diligence in every good work. 

Miss Sarah Holland had joined Mr. Wesley's Society at the 
age of sixteen, contrary to the wishes of her family, though 
in accordance with her own conviction of right. 

Her father was an affluent man, and Captain in the Militia ; 
but neither himself nor her gay and handsome sisters cared 
for spiritual things, but rather doing all in their power to 



92 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

dissuade her from casting in her lot with the despised people 
of God. 

But none of these things moved her. She at once boldly 
took up the consecrated cross, and bore it firmly and con- 
sistently to the end of her long life. 

Mrs. Brackenbury survived her husband twenty- 
nine years. All through these years she continued 
the friend and benefactress of Portland. She 
visited it frequently, and often made it her home. 
We have abundant evidence of this. In letter 
after letter which it has been my privilege to see 
and read, she speaks of Portland and its people in 
the most endearing terms. 

Writing from Portland to the wife of the Eev. 
Eichard Smith, she says : — 

You will see by this date, my dear friend, that you rightly 
conjectured that I might be from home, and yet I have but 
exchanged one home for another, for this place speaks to my 
heart of endearments and enjoyments so deeply inwrought 
in my very existence that they will live and die together. 

When we remember that this lady possessed 
one of the most beautiful homes, at Kaithby Hall, 
that a person could have in this world, we cannot 
but be proud that she should so highly esteem 
Portland. The Eev. John Wesley in his Journal, 



MR. BRACKENBURY'S DEATH 93 

3rd July 1788, refers to it thus: "We went to 
Raithby — an earthly Paradise — how gladly would 
I rest here a few days ! But it is not my place. I 
am to be a wanderer upon earth : only let me 
find rest in a better world." 

This one extract, I think, proves the deep and 
almost inexpressible affection she had for Portland. 

Although Mrs. Brackenbury stayed at Kaithby 
Hall more than usual after the death of her husband, 
yet Portland was perhaps more favoured than any 
other place with her presence. 



CHAPTER VII 

FIKST CHAPEL ON THE HILL 

In the year 1823, during the time the Eev. John 
Appleyard was stationed at Portland, the first 
remembered Sunday school treat took place. It 
was not the usual " cake and tea," but beef and 
plum-pudding ; and it took place not at the chapel, 
nor the schoolroom (for the latter was not yet 
built), but at the Crown Hotel at Chisel. 

It is remembered to-day by some who were 
present — Mr. Thomas Attwooll of Wakeham, and 
Mrs. Lowman of Southwell, widow of Mr. William 
Lowman, whose writings I have so often quoted. 
Mrs. Lowman, now ninety years of age, has 
been a member of the Society for seventy-one 
years. 

On leaving the hotel to return to the chapel, 
each scholar was presented with an orange, and 

94 



FIRST CHAPEL ON THE HILL 95 

some remembered it as the first orange they ever 
had. 

The year following this happy incident was 
perhaps the saddest and most terrible that has ever 
happened to Portland. 

Towards the close of the year 1824 the weather 
was unusually wild, and on the 23rd of November 
the sea rose so high that it overflowed the Chisel 
Beach. Anything like it had not been known before, 
and hence the people were not prepared for it. 
The story is a tragic one. The old and weak, 
the infant and the mother, were borne down 
by the flood. Twenty persons were killed or 
drowned. Between twenty and thirty houses were 
washed down. 

In Mr. Lowman's writings there is a touching 
story in connection with this event. He tells of 
one Grace Mitchell who was among the number 
who were drowned, and whose funeral took place 
on the 6 th of December. In the afternoon of 
this day, and perhaps after returning from the 
funeral, a young man, John Comben, with his 
brother, Thomas Comben, and Mr. Lowman, were 
walking from Chisel around under the cliff, whilst 



96 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

the father, Bartholomew Comben, was walking along 
the top ; suddenly, and without a moment's warn- 
ing, a large portion of the cliff fell away, eighty 
or ninety yards in length, and representing 
thousands of tons. 

Mr. Lowman, who has made a very full and 
interesting record of it, says that it was between 
three and four o'clock in the afternoon. He only 
just escaped, being but a few yards from his com- 
panion, who, he says, " was beat to dust." Mr. 
Lowman says also that in this case " sudden death 
was sudden glory," for frequently had this young 
man spoken to him about his being prepared to 
die ; for he (Mr. Lowman) was not at this time a 
Christian. But just a page or two on, in the 
same manuscript, is written : " Memorandum that 
on the 8th day of April 1826 William Lowman 
joined the Methodist Society, and met in John 
Andrews' class." 

The year 1825 was a year of some importance 
to Portland in several respects, but we must pass 
over those matters which pertain to general interest 
and restrict our remarks to Methodism. 

We may, however, mention that in consequence 



FIRST CHAPEL ON THE HILL 97 

of several disasters and deaths which had occurred 
while crossing the ferry, subscriptions were 
canvassed for the purpose of erecting a bridge at 
this place. The arrangement for crossing with the 
boat and rope had been utterly destroyed by the 
gale of last year. 

The story of the building of this bridge, and of 
the common money which was afterwards invested 
in it, I need not further refer to. 

This year saw the first piece of railway laid in 
the island. 

Its chief interest to us as Methodists is, that it 
witnessed the erection of the first chapel on the 
Hill. 

It must not, however, be forgotten that regular 
services had been held at Wakeham from the first. 
Some are still with us who remember the Sunday 
school in Jan Thorner's cottage, where the girls met 
upstairs, and the boys on the ground floor. Besides 
which, many a cottage was used for class and 
prayer meetings. 

The old thatched cottage at Wakeham had now 
to give place to the chapel, which furnishes 
another proof of the generosity of Mrs. Brackenbury. 

7 



98 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

As the chapel and minister's house at Fortune's 
Well had been built by her husband, so this was 
built at her expense. 

On the 7th of August 1825 the Kev. George 
Smith came to Portland for the purpose of opening 
this first chapel on the Hill. No more fitting 
person could be found, for it was this same good 
man who, as the companion of Mr. Brackenbury, 
came to Portland in 1791, and who first suggested 
to Mr. Brackenbury the desirability of building 
the chapel at Fortune's Well, who worked for 
its erection, and who must have taken part in its 
% opening. 

For a Memoir of this excellent man, I can only 
refer you to the article before quoted, which may 
be found in the Methodist Magazine for the year 
1833, written by his son, Mr. William Bramwell 
Smith. 

No doubt he would find an agreeable contrast 
in the character and behaviour of the people in 
Portland now to those of whom he wrote in April 
1791. Then he said of the people of Portland, 
" And whereas strangers formerly could hardly pass 
on the road unmolested," " now order and decorum 



FIRST CHAPEL ON THE HILL 99 

are seen in all parts ; and although smuggling 
is still carried on by some persons, it is greatly 
curtailed." 

Mr. Smith entered the ministry whilst at 
Portland in 1792, and after a long and faithful 
service of much important labour, passed away to 
his reward on the 25th day of January 1832. 

His visit to Portland, after an absence of over 
thirty years, was, as we have said, for the purpose 
of opening the chapel at Wakeham. His text 
on that occasion was taken from the 28th chapter 
of Genesis, 16th and 17th verses: "And Jacob 
awaked out of his sleep, and he said, Surely the 
Lord is in this place ; and I knew it not. And 
he was afraid, and said, How dreadful is this place ! 
this is none other but the house of God, and this 
is the gate of heaven." 

On the following day he preached in the mother 
chapel at Fortune's Well from the text, " God is 
love. He that dwelleth in love dwelleth in God, 
and God in him." 

It becomes us to pay a tribute of grateful respect 
to the memory of Mr. Smith, for we owe him much. 
Whilst we would not attempt to lessen the respect 



ioo METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

due to Mr. Brackenbury, who reintroduced and 
established Methodism in Portland, we must 
remember that Mr. Smith was his companion and 
fellow- labourer, and bore with him the opposition 
and reproach which their work here received. It 
is to him more than to any other that we are 
indebted for a full and detailed account of their 
labours in Portland and other places in Dorset. 

We cannot pass away from the year 1825 
without referring to the death of one who is 
remembered as the " Portland Boy." James 
Mabey died in September of this year, and 
«iter his death his friends discovered in his room 
a diary, which he had kept for the last year 
past. It was not so much a record of events, as 
the register of the pious and sacred breathings of 
his soul. In that diary for the 7 th of August he 
writes : " Mr. George Smith opened our little 
chapel at Wakeham to-day." 

For a fuller account of this chapel, I give an 
extract from the Wesleyan Methodist Magazine for 
December 1825 : — 

Wakeham, Isle of Portland, in the Weymouth Circuit. — 
On Sunday, August 7th, 1825, a new chapel was opened in 



MRS. BRACKENBURY'S FAVOURS 101 

this place by the Rev. George Smith. It is about 24 feet 
by 36 within, and will cost nearly £190. Every Sabbath 
day in the afternoon it is crowded ; all the pews are let, and 
more are applied for. The erection of a gallery is already 
contemplated. 

The Rev. James Dunbar commenced his labours 
in Portland this year, and his first sermon in 
the island was preached on the 29th of August. 
We have already referred to the good work of this 
useful man, and in Mr. Lowman's writings are 
entered perhaps the texts of all the sermons he 
preached in Portland. 

The year following is also crowded with incidents 
of both Methodist and general interest. We have 
already noted that it was this year that the breach 
was healed in the riven Society. 

There was no chapel at Southwell as yet, but 
Mr. Dunbar made a regular practice of preaching 
there — in the open air when the weather permitted, 
and at other times in Charles Whittle's house. 



MRS. BRACKKXBURY S FAVOURS 

We are this year introduced to another of the 
faithful band of local preachers, in the person of 



102 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

Daniel Wallis. He was a poor man — a carter — 
belonging to Preston. He was, however, possessed 
of an intelligent mind and a noble nature. 

After his conversion he felt called to preach ; 
and although in a very humble way, yet his efforts 
attracted attention. 

Among those who first noticed his conduct was 
his own master, who belonged to that class of 
people who had no sympathy with Methodism, and 
could not retain in his employ a man that had the 
presumption to preach. He was consequently 
dismissed. 

* There were others, however, whose attention had 
been attracted, and among them one who perceived 
that this man was possessed of talents that were 
worthy of opportunities of improvement. He was 
fortunately a young man, and by the generous help 
of Mrs. Brackenbury was apprenticed to a carpenter, 
and devoted his spare time to Christian service. 
After some time he emigrated to America. 

We are pleased to be able to record, however, 
that in Portland during these years there seems to 
have existed a very friendly feeling between the 
Methodist Society and the Church. These cordial 



MRS. BRACKENBURY'S FAVOURS 103 

relations were largely due to the good influence of 
Mrs. Brackenbury, who when sending hampers of 
game and other presents to her Methodist friends, 
did not overlook the clergyman and his family. I 
may here insert one of her letters, written to Mr. 
and Mrs. Gibbs. 

Dear Friends, — Accept my best thanks for your kind 
letter and kind present of a sheep. It gives me much pleasure 
to hear of the spiritual prosperity you are so happy as to 
witness. I am glad that a new class has been formed, that 
you have many hearers of the word, and that Mr. Dunbar is 
so active and zealous among you ; and I sincerely hope the 
present season of affliction in the island will be sanctified to 
many. It loudly cries — ' Prepare to meet your God,' — and 
oh, how much better to meet Him now in the way of mercy 
than to meet Him hereafter in the way of judgment ! I am 
glad also to hear that your Sunday school is so well attended, 
and sincerely hope, if it pleases God to continue my health 
and life, to come in the spring, that we may by His blessing 
be helpers in each other's joy. It is refreshing to the spirits 
of weary pilgrims sometimes to meet in the way to our 
Father's house ; but when we arrive there, who can tell what 
the triumph will be ! Oh, let us mend our pace heavenward. 
Let us push on with fresh speed. The path of life is very 
short, so that we need not fear any long tarrying in the vale 
of woe. Beside, the Saviour's love and the Saviour's presence 
will comfort and support us to the end, if we look to Him 
and depend on Him. 

Offer my Christian love to your whole family, to the 



io 4 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

preachers and the friends, and tell them not to forget how 
much I need their prayers, as I do yours also. 

And now let me say how very delicious we think the 
Portland mutton is. My best friends in this place and 
neighbourhood have been allowed to taste it, and all agree 
in the superior quality and flavour of it above our Lincoln- 
shire mutton ; so that you see that you have not only 
gratified me by your kindness, but you have enabled me to 
gratify my friends also. 

I should enclose a bill in this letter towards the preacher's 
board in Portland, but I fear it might not come so safe as by 
post, so that it shall be sent in a few days to Mr. Rossell. 

Praying that the abundant grace of God may be your 
portion, I remain, dear friends, yours affectionately, 

S. Brackenbury. 

I wish you may relish the hare and goose as much as we 
do* your excellent mutton. 

Some of the later letters contain specific reference 
to the clergyman, and tell what presents are for him. 
The kindly feeling is very manifest in such services 
as the annual missionary meetings. I may be 
pardoned if I give the amount of collection at the 
Foreign Missionary Meeting of the church held on 
the 20 th of August of this year, and friends may 
be able to compare it with the collections of 
present years. The amount was £8,1 0s 3d. 

On the 2nd of September a special collection 



MRS. BRACKENBURY'S FAVOURS 105 

was made at the church on behalf of the widows 
and orphans of men lost in the Weymouth packet. 
This was a very painful calamity. It is recorded 
by Mr. Lowman, who says : " The packet sailing 
out of Weymouth with ten seamen and six people 
on board, was run down by what was believed to 
have been a foreign brig, and all hands perished." 
Some of these belonged to Portland, and the 
collection was made on behalf of the bereaved 
families. The amount collected was £5, 8s. 

We cannot stay to notice events of more general 
concern, although some of them may be termed 
important. 

It was in this year that stone was first carried on 
the new railway. It was a very wet day, and the 
first stone slipped off the cart. I cannot, however, 
determine whether it slipped off on account of the 
rain, or through the effects of the four hogsheads of 
beer which were given away to celebrate the event. 

I shall be excused if it is out of place to men- 
tion that at an election which took place, Col. 
Gordon was carried on the 27th of June at 
Weymouth, after fifteen days' polling. Several 
Portlanders were hired out at 5s. per day and 



106 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

as much as they could eat and drink, to assist voters 
to the poll. Early next year, nevertheless, five of 
these men were detained at Dorchester for services 
rendered. 

Interesting as all this may be, I must pass it 
over, and rapidly note some events of 1827. 

DAY SCHOOLS AND MASTERS 

This year is made famous by the introduction 
into Portland of horse-racing, which commenced on 
the 20th of September. 

% We may be permitted to note the removal by 
death of the celebrated " Master Harry," who in his 
day had been the only day school master in the 
island. 

There was some difficulty in filling up his place ; 
but at a public meeting the no less celebrated 
" Little Bobby " was appointed. The church 
clergyman, however (Mr. Port), required him to take 
the scholars to church every Sunday ; but being 
a Wesleyan, and his sympathies more in favour 
with the Methodists, this he most emphatically 
declined to do. 



DAY SCHOOLS AND MASTERS 107 

The post again being vacant, Mr. John Benfield 
Scriven was ultimately appointed in his stead. 

This interference with the rights of the children, 
in compelling them to attend church, led to an effort 
to provide another school, and the very next month 
steps were taken to form a company to build a new 
one, which was done, and opened on the 1 3 th of June, 
and the said "Little Bobby" was appointed master of 
the " British School," as the new school was called. 

In October of this year the first organised choir 

was formed at the Fortune's Well Chapel, and in 

honour of their memory I may be permitted to give 

their names : — 

Singers. 

John Collins, Benjamin Fuzzard, John Dine, John Mar- 
wood, Robert Gibbs. 

Players. 

Joseph Hoskins, Robert Flew, William Pearce. 

Female Singers. 
Mary Gibbs, Susannah Allen, Alice Newman, Charlotte 
Collins, Elizabeth Davis, and Elizabeth Allen. 

Mr. Lowman says : " They began to play with 
their instruments on December 9th." 

On the 11th of February of the following year 
the seat rents were raised at Fortune's Well Chapel. 



CHAPTEE VIII 

STRANGERS AND STRANGE EVENTS 

The ferry bridge works, which were commenced on 
the 2nd of September of this year, under the 
foremanship of William Spencer, may be supposed 
to have introduced a foreign element into Portland, 
fQr we find parish meetings called to consider 
" strangers taking away the rights of the in- 
habitants." 

Some circumstances shortly took place which, 
although they may not have affected the rights of 
Portlanders, certainly cast reflections upon their 
character. 

On the 30th of November 1829 a letter was 
found in Squire Penn's grove — Pennsylvania Castle 
grounds — stating that unless he should put fifty 
pounds in a certain place, by a certain day his life 
would be taken, and his dead body dragged through 

1C8 



STRANGERS AND STRANGE EVENTS 109 

the streets, and a regiment of soldiers should not 
prevent it. 

This was a new thing in Portland, and a serious 
thing. Two Portland men — A. Mitchell and E. 
Andrews — were taken up on suspicion, tried and 
discharged. 

A parish meeting was called, and a reward 
offered. The parish officers did not believe that 
such a matter emanated from any Portlander. After 
much fuss had been made, a woman who had lived 
with the foreign friend of Squire Penn — Baron 
Nolken — confessed herself the sole author of the plot. 

Whether or not the squire placed any money, as 
demanded by this threat, does not appear, but it is 
quite certain several guineas were found in the 
old walls of the castle grounds some years later. 

The Wesley an Foreign Missionary Meeting this 
year took place on the 5th of October, and we 
note a prominent gentleman of Weymouth — 
W Devenish, Esq., took the chair. The collection 
amounted to £10, 6s. 

The Foreign Missionary sermons at church were 
preached by the Rev. T. A. Methuen, M.A., on the 
11th, and the collection was £6. 



no METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

We must hasten over the years, only stopping 
to notice that the Kev. B. Stephenson was stationed 
at Portland in 1831, and he in his day found 
it desirable, in addition to his ministerial engage- 
ments, to offer some advice to the people respect- 
ing their political duties. A general election was 
taking place, and fifty special constables had 
been sworn in. The public meetings were held 
in the open air, and the speakers stood upon 
a stone to address the people. Mr. Stephenson 
availed himself of the privilege of occupying 
this exalted position ; but his remarks were 
not relished by all, and a certain gentleman 
pulled him down. When I remember I had a 
similar experience at the hands of one of the 
descendants of this gentleman, I must conclude 
that it " runs in the blood." 

Before passing away from this year, we stop to 
record the death of one of the oldest and best of 
the early Methodists, Mr. John Marwood. We 
may call him John Marwood 1. 

It will be seen he was appointed a class leader 
in the year 1797. 1 

1 See Appendix, p 156. 



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JUBILEE OF SUNDAY SCHOOLS in 

He was buried in the chapel graveyard at 
Fortune's Well, on the 3rd of January. The old 
parish clerk, William Hinde, and the Baron Nolken 
just now referred to, also died this year. 

THE JUBILEE OF SUNDAY SCHOOLS 

The jubilee of the origin of Sunday schools was 
celebrated in the year 1832. The Methodists of 
Portland suitably observed the event, and Mrs. 
Brackenbury presented each scholar in the Sunday 
schools with a pictorial handkerchief as a memento 
of it. 

Mrs. Lowman, of Southwell, has one of these 
preserved. On the top is a picture of the founder, 
with a boy and girl on either side represented as 
reading. In the bottom right - hand corner is a 
view of a country church, and in the left a rural 
scene, with a church in the distance. 

There are three hymns printed in full. The 
first is the old familiar Sabbath - school hymn, 
" Where do children love to go ? " etc. This is set 
to music. The second hymn is in the same metre, 
and called " We never part from Thee " ; and the 



ii2 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

third, " The Golden Kule." The whole is headed in 
large letters — " Sabbath Schools first instituted by 
Eobert Eaikes in Gloucestershire in the year of our 
Lord 1782." 

It will be remembered that the year 1880 was 
observed as the centenary of the origin of Sunday 
schools, which places that event two years earlier 
than was reckoned when the jubilee was kept. 

It is probable that the condition and general 
characteristics of the islanders, their manners and 
customs up to this period, had not very materially 
changed from what they had been for centuries. 
A new and changed condition, however, was not far 
distant. The quiet isolation was soon to be broken 
in upon, and Portland to become more distinctly 
connected with modern England. 

The representatives of the Government had been 
casting longing eyes towards the island, and large 
and important national works were contemplated. 
The construction of a bridge over the ferry, for 
which an Act of Parliament was obtained in the 
year 1835 (although the work had been started 
some seven years before), had the effect of bringing 
the island nearer to the mainland. On the 25 th 



A VISITOR'S IMPRESSIONS 113 

of October of this year (1835) a notice was posted 
on the church respecting the proposed construction 
of a breakwater, and the near approach of great 
events began to foreshadow themselves. 

I am able to give an interesting account of the 
island and its people before these great events had 
disturbed them. It is copied from an early 
publication called the Penny Magazine, and is the 
account of the visit of a gentleman in the year 
1836. 



A VISITORS IMPRESSIONS OF PORTLAND AND 

ITS PEOPLE 

" On the only Sunday which I spent in the isle, 
I had scarcely finished a late breakfast when the 
landlord of the ' Portland Arms ' sent to ask if I 
was ready for church, and whether I would 
' honour him ' by taking a seat in the family pew. 
This request, so unusual in an innkeeper, was 
gladly accepted, and in a few minutes I was climb- 
ing Fortune's Well Hill in his company, on our 
way to St. George's Church, two miles off, and the 
only one in the island. At this place the morning 

8 



ii 4 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

service commences at half-past ten. At ten 
precisely the sexton takes his post at the belfry- 
window, and with a telescope keeps a sharp look- 
out for the clergyman, who lives at some distance. 
As soon as he appears in sight, the watchman 
descends, and proceeds to spread the intelligence 
by tolling a large bell. Previously to this, the 
male worshippers arrive, and spend their time in 
loitering about the gravestones ; but the moment 
the tolling of the bell commences, a general bustle 
ensues ; some make their way into the church, but 
the greater part take their stand at the door, or 
Jine the pathway, with a view of bowing to the 
clergyman as he passes. The women, meanwhile, 
obey the summons, and, hastening to the church, 
arrive just in time to pay their courtesies to the 
preacher, who, with many kind acknowledgments 
of their respect, passes on to the discharge of his 
duties. The church is a plain structure, built in 
a spurious Grecian style ; it was consecrated on 
the 29th July 1766. George n. gave £300 
towards its erection, and George in. £100 towards 
its repairs. The interior is spacious, and divided 
into roomy and very high-backed pews, on which 



A VISITOR'S IMPRESSIONS 115 

the peculiar custom prevails of painting in con- 
spicuous letters the names of the persons renting 
them, and the number of the seats held: thus, 
' Zechariah White, Two Places ; ' ' Abraham Winter 
(my landlord), Six Places.' The panels of the 
galleries were painted with texts of Scripture. 
The choral department was under the control of 
an ill-toned organ, assisted by a clarionet and 
violoncello. 

" When the people had assembled, the simplicity 
of their character was curiously manifested in the 
ease with which each one took the most convenient 
posture. 

" The service commenced by a hymn from forty 
girls, educated in the church Sunday school. The 
prayers followed. The responses were singularly 
dissonant — the prolonged sound of some two or 
three hundred bass voices, in which every word 
was solidly distinguished, for a moment startled 
my notions of propriety : I had forgotten my 
locality. 

" Before service, the following verses were sung 
with a hoarse but eloquent emphasis, which taken 
in connection with the disasters peculiar to the 



n6 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

quarrymen's trade, was to my mind singularly 
touching and impressive : — 

From common accidents of life 

His care shall guard thee still ; 
From the blind strokes of chance, and foes 

That lie in wait to kill. 

At home, abroad, in peace, in war, 

Thy God shall thee defend ; 
Conduct thee, through life's pilgrimage, 

Safe to thy journey's end. 

"After the sermon, a collection was made to 
defray the expenses of lighting the church on 
winter nights ; — the money was taken, not in a 
plate, but in a Bandana handkerchief, laid loosely 
over the opening of a hat. 

" On the close of the service, I took a walk over 
the island. The people were everywhere cleanly, 
and the females even elegantly clad. The latter 
wear ample gowns ; the hair, without curls, simply 
parted over the forehead and tied up behind ; and 
to protect the back of the neck from sun or rain, 
a large and variously ornamented ' curtain ' de- 
scends from the hinder part of the bonnet. The 
intervals of worship are spent in conversation ; and 



A VISITOR'S IMPRESSIONS 117 

if the day be fine, knots of from ten to twenty may 
be seen on the outskirts of the villages, seated or 
stretched on the ground, in a happy state of rest 
and sociality. The women keep house; and the 
children are sent to Sunday schools, of which there 
are several. No games or drinking bouts ' fright 
the isle from its propriety/ but a cheerful and 
intelligent quietude seems to reign. There are 
two large and well-attended chapels at Chiswell 
and Fortune's Well, and many classes for religious 
instruction in private houses in other parts of the 
island. At Easton, in the centre of the island, 
stand the ruins of what is called the Vicar's House. 
The inhabitants know little about it, but have a tradi- 
tion that it was a fine place, demolished in the Civil 
Wars. It was probably a monastic establishment. 
" The walk over the top of the island will 
introduce the visitor to five of its seven villages ; 
and as they are the only peculiar objects which 
remain to be described, I shall with them bring my 
week in Portland to a close. It is hardly possible 
for human habitations to present, collectively, a 
more dreary and unsocial aspect than a Portland 
village. The houses of one of these townships 



n8 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

vary from one to two hundred in number, and 
stand on each side of a wide, grass-grown road, full 
of ruts and covered with scattered stones. Not a 
tree or bush is to be seen ; no rural sound is to be 
heard ; the only objects before the traveller are 
monotonous piles of ragged stone walls, dust heaps, 
and bare rocks. There is, however, much that is 
individually interesting in these places. The 
houses are built to endure the local vicissitudes of 
the climate, and to meet the peculiar wants of the 
inhabitants, and are contrived for those purposes. 
The walls are built of large blocks of the rougher 
sorts of stone, the chimneys of brick, and the roofs 
of broad thin slabs of stone, but sometimes of slate 
or tile, in which cases, to protect the roof from 
being lifted by the wind, the edges are bound with 
a treble row of stone slabs. The form of the roof 
is usually that of a gable, with a considerable 
pitch : the doors have those comfortable append- 
ages which it is to be regretted are now totally out 
of fashion in poor men's houses, deep and well- 
seated porches, with square or angular tops ; these, 
together with the window bars and borders, are 
kept neatly whitewashed, and give favourable 



A VISITOR'S IMPRESSIONS 119 

testimony to the cleanliness of the inhabitants. 
Internally, the smaller houses are divided into four 
rooms, lined throughout with unpainted wood, and 
furnished with roomy cupboards, and are dry, warm, 
and free from vermin. The rent varies, £3 to £5 
per annum. In front of each house stands a hen- 
coop, built of ponderous stone blocks, a dust-hole 
of the same huge materials, and a cistern for rain- 
water, cut out of a solid block of compact freestone 
as large as the Belzoni sarcophagus, and requiring 
almost as much labour for its excavation. Indeed, 
the size of the masses of stone commonly used in 
the construction of walls, door-jambs, gate-posts, etc., 
fills the mind of the stranger with astonishment. 
I measured one used in building a hedge-wall, and 
found it 7 ft. by 5, with a proportionate thickness. 
" The Portland quarrymen constitute about five 
hundred of the population, which in 1831 numbered 
2670, and are evidently a distinct and well-defined 
race. They are nobly formed, and come very nearly 
to the finest antique models of strength and beauty. 
In height they vary from five feet ten inches to 
six feet. Large bones, well - knit and strongly- 
compacted muscles, confirmed in their united 



120 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

energies by the hardest labour in a pure atmo- 
sphere, give them a power so herculean that three 
cwts. is lifted by men of ordinary strength with 
ease. Their features are regularly and boldly 
developed ; eyes black, but deprived of their due 
expression by the partial closure of the lids, caused 
by the glare of the stone ; - complexion a bright 
ruddy orange ; the hair dark and plentiful, and the 
general expression of the countenance mild and 
intelligent. Their usual summer costume on 
working days is a slouched straw hat covered with 
canvas and painted black, a shirt with narrow 
blue stripes, and white canvas trousers. On 
Sundays they add to these a sailor's short blue 
jacket, and looked very like good-natured tars in 
their holiday trim. 

" They have no place of confinement in the island, 
and stocks, whipping-posts, or any analogous instru- 
ments, or modes of punishment, are totally unknown. 

" The magistracy is a sinecure, a committal not 
taking place once in fifty years. ' In shart,' said an 
islander whom we questioned, ' an accident might 
happen in that length, but then it would be a 
chance,' 



A VISITOR'S IMPRESSIONS 121 

" No persons are allowed to live together in an 
unmarried state. 

" The Sabbath is strictly observed with uniform 
propriety. The degree of sanctity with which it is 
regarded may be estimated by the fact that I heard 
it related as a tale of wonder that in London boys 
were actually allowed to play marbles on Sunday. 

" The strongest oath and the common expletive 
is, ' On the word of a Portland man.' 

" These facts, in connection with various others of 
a similar but minor character, present an amount 
of public virtue as admirable as we believe it to be 
unparalleled in the British Islands. We were happy, 
but not surprised, in learning that this desirable state 
of things is clearly traceable to the influence of Bible 
principles — a circumstance which we shall not stay 
here to prove, beyond stating that in the Wesleyan 
Chapel at Fortune's Well, out of a congregation of 
six hundred persons, there are one hundred and 
seventy approved communicants." 

Changes were also produced in the island by 
other circumstances beside the introduction of 
public works. 



CHAPTEE IX 

NEW LAWS AND ANCIENT CUSTOMS 

The passing of the Tithes Commutation Act in 
1836 affected Portland more than most places in 
England, in consequence of a very peculiar custom 
which had prevailed in the island from time 
immemorial. Before this period tithes had been 
paid in kind, and there is an interesting account 
in the ancient records of the island, explaining the 
manner of collecting tithes in Portland, which reads 
as follows : — 

As to Tyths. 

The Hay allways are put up in small Cocks, the Parson or 
Procter take the tenth Poake. 

The Wheat put in straight lines, the Parson or Procter 
take the tenth Shieve. 

Barley and other Grain by the Shieve or Poake and takes 
the tithe in the same manner. 

As to the Cow, witt, allways paid a Penny for each Cow 
yearly. 

122 



NEW LAWS AND ANCIENT CUSTOMS 123 

As to Calfs sold ; the Parson or Procter have the tenth 
Penny soe sold — if killed the Parson have the left shoulder 
of the same — or the Procter : and if the Calf is weaned to pay 
one halfpenny to the Parson or Procter. 

Lambs allways tithed. The Owner thereof makes choice 
of Two first ; the Parson or Procter takes the third Lamb out 
of seven or ten, and if more Lambs, the Parson or Procter take 
the tenth Lamb ; and soe on. And if any odd Lambs, to pay 
the Parson or Procter one halfpenny per Lambe. And if but 
seven Lambs in all, the Parson or Procter take one and return 
to the owner back again one penny each Lamb. For three 
Lambs fourpence halfpenny. 

As to Wooll off the Sheep. The Parson or Procter hath the 
tenth part thereof. But if Sheep are sold with the Wool on 
their backs before shorn, to pay the Parson or Procter 
twopence each Sheep soe sold. 

Fish. The Parson has the Tith of Ffish drawn on the 
shoare of Mackerel. 

Gardens. As to the Gardens, according to an antient 
Custome pays fourpence ; if Large more money ; and gener- 
ally collected on Good Ffriday by the Parson or Procter. 

Henns. As to them, or any person keep the same ; the 
Parson or Procter take one egg for every Henn ; and two for 
a Cock, which is generally collected on Good Ffriday. 

Offerings and other Oblations paid by every Parishioner 
according to antient Custoine, and generally collected yearly. 

The above transmitted to the Court at Blanford ye 18 
Day of September 1784, and a coppy of the same lodged in 
the ( 'best in the Parish Church to be a Guide allways for the 
Parishioners— Time Immemorial and signed then by the then 
Reverend Mr. Samuel Payne Rector of said Island and Mannor 



i2 4 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

of Portland — Together with the Principal Inhabitants thereof 
as a Testefication. 

Another record of a return sent to Dorchester 
21st June 1835, preparatory to the passing of 
the Tithes Commutation Act, may be interesting : — 
Total rateable value, £1735, 13s. 4d. Poor rate, 
£43, 7s. 10d., at 6d. in the pound. Land tax, 
£67, 7s. Number of acres, 1686. Number of 
houses, 581. Number of public-houses, 1 (?). 
Annual value of arable land, 10 s. per acre. 
Annual value of meadow down and pasture land, 
20 s. per acre. Price of wheat per bushel, December 
1832 (at our last valuation), was 7s. per bushel. 
Kent of cottages from £1, 10s. to £4 per annum; 
farm-houses, £5 per annum. 

By the passing of the Act of 1836, tithes were 
in future to be paid in money. 

The custom referred to above may be explained 
as follows : All the fields in the island were 
divided into districts, thus — West Field, East 
Field, South Field, Droop Field, etc. 

Each field was enclosed by walls, which were 
maintained at the expense of the parish, and 
planted by their owners only alternate years. 



NEW LAWS AND ANCIENT CUSTOMS 125 

Thus the fields had what used to be called 
" closed years " and " open years." 

When fields were closed, the owners of the 
various pieces of land in these fields planted them 
and gathered their crops in the ordinary way ; but 
the following year these fields were treated as 
" common," and open to all cattle of the island 
irrespective of ownership. 

From such a custom, it followed the tithes could 
only be gathered every other year ; but by this 
new law the rector was entitled to his tithes 
every year, and to be paid in money. To those 
who were owners of land and not equally owners 
of cattle, the custom of the island was an injustice. 
There consequently arose a large amount of dis- 
satisfaction. Those who owned no cattle clamoured 
for the right to plant their lands every year, whilst 
those who had much cattle claimed custom to be 
superior to law. 

For several years this agitation continued, and 
much bitterness of feeling was manifested. It was 
finally settled in the year 1843, when this old and 
singular custom had to yield to justice and common 
sense. 



i 2 6 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

How the settlement was obtained is fairly- 
described in one of the squibs written at the time, 
by an eminent scribe of the last generation known 
as " Little Bobby." 

Here beginneth the first chapter of Clarick O'Clinker. 

1. Now it came to pass in the sixth year of the reign of 
Victoria the first, that there was a sore grievance in the land, 
from the beginning of Chiswell even to the end of Southwell. 

2. And the poor cried out with a loud voice, "Give us 
bread ! give us bread ! " 

3. So that the elders of the people were moved with com- 
passion, and they assembled together and consulted among 
themselves what should be done. 

4. And they said, " Let us close the fields, so that we may 
have greater barley harvests and greater wheat harvests, that 
the poor may be filled." 

5. Now there happened to live at that same place certain 
ignorant and selfish persons, who had not the welfare of 
the poor at heart ; and when they heard that these things 
should be done for the benefit of the poor, they said, " Let us 
oppose it." 

6. And they assembled the tribes of the Eastonites and the 
tribes of the Kefornites together at an inu which lyeth 
beyond Easton Lane even unto the borders of the water 
called "Great Pool." 

7. And they said, " Let us deal secretly with our opponents, 
that they may not hear of our doings." 

8. Nevertheless, the elders of the people heard of it, and 
they being upright men who feared God, and did that which 



NEW LAWS AND ANCIENT CUSTOMS 127 

was right in the sight of the Lord, they said, "Let us go 
among them and reason with them." 

9. But the Refornites and the Eastonites would not meet 
them openly, for said they, " These men are too strong for us." 
And a Refornite who was held in great reverence among 
them, because he was a servant of God and did cry, " Amen," 
after the High Priest in the Temple of the Lord on the 
Sabbath day ; 

10. Stood up amongst them, and did spake these words, 
" ye Eastonites and Refornites, give ear unto my words. 
Let us give unto the scribe which dwells below the Hill one 
piece of silver to write a petition for us to send unto the 
Commissioners of the Woods and Forests, and therein to state 
our grievances." 

11. And they sent for the scribe to do according to what 
they had spoken. 

12. And he came unto them and said, "Verily I say unto 
you, I will do this thing for you if you will cause two pieces 
of silver to be delivered unto me." 

13. And they raised a subscription among themselves to 
pay the scribe. 

14. But it came to pass that they could not raise enough 
to pay the scribe. 

15. Nevertheless, they gave him one piece, and promised 
him the other. 

16. So he wrote the petition, and they caused it to be 
delivered into the hands of the Commissioners of the Woods 
and Forests ; for they said one unto the other, " If we that 
have a few sheep and no land do agree that this land shall 
be enclosed, we shall have nothing wherewith to feed our 
cattle, so that our substance shall be wasted." 



128 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

17. Now it came to pass that the Commissioners of the 
"Woods and Forests read the petition of the Eastonites and the 
Refornites, so that their bowels moved with compassion, and 
they had pity on them. 

18. And they said, "Let us send our servant into the land, 
so that there may be no wrong done unto these men." 

19. And, behold, their servant came among them, and would 
have called together the elders of the people ; but the elders 
came unto this man and said, " God be with you," and he said, 
" Amen." 

20. But the Eastonites and the Refornites would not come 
to meet him, because they were sore afraid they should lose 
their cause if they met him in the presence of the elders. 

21. And they said, " Let us wait for him, and when he is 
alone we will bring him to our houses, we will cast ourselves 
at his feet and do homage to him, and we will present him 
with a fine fat sheep and a pig, so that it shall come to pass 
he will bear towards us, so that we shall get the better of our 
enemies." 

22. And it came to pass as this Man of the Woods and 
Forests was walking out alone in the cool of the evening as he 
was wont to do, they came unto him and invited him into 
their house ; 

23. But he, being an upright and conscientious man, would 
not hearken unto them, and turned his back upon them and 
went another way, for he saw they were bad men, who 
delighted in serving the Devil rather than God. 

24. Now it came to pass that this servant of the Commis- 
sioners of the Woods and Forests departed unto his own land, 
and told unto them that sent him the whole truth, and what 
benefit it would be in enclosing the land ; 




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DEVELOPMENT OF METHODISM 129 

25. "Whereof the Commissioners were sore offended with 
the Eastonites and Reform tes, and they vowed that the land 
should be enclosed for the benefit of the poor. 

26. And so it came to pass, when the Eastonites and the 
Refornites saw the man turn his back upon them, because of 
their wickedness, that they covered their faces and went and 
hid themselves, and have not since been heard of even unto 
this day. 

Thus endeth the first chapter of Clarick O'Clinker. 

27. And the rest of the deeds of these bad men, are they 
not written in the second chapter of the same book ? 

From the time of the settlement of the above 
question, the various owners of lands in Portland 
have had full and absolute control of their fields, 
and have been able to plant them each succeeding 
year at will, which had not been the case before. 



DEVELOPMENT OF METHODISM 

I must again revert to my subject of Methodism, 
for the year 1836 witnessed a still further de- 
velopment of it. It was at this time steps were 
first taken to obtain a site for building a chapel 
at Southwell. 

There are letters from Mrs. Brackenbury this 
year, in one of which she sent £40 for the purchase 

9 



i 3 o METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

of some property belonging to the family of the 
Whittles, and begs to be remembered to Friend 
Hoskins, who had recently suffered a bereave- 
ment, and thanks Mr. Gibbs for the present of a 
sheep. 

By church gift bearing date November 25 th, 
1836, certain premises were conveyed by Hannah 
Whittle, for the above purpose, to the following 
trustees : — Abraham Mills, of Chisel, baker ; Thomas 
Comben, of the same place, quarryman ; Eobert 
Hinde, of Weston, shoemaker; William Attwooll, 
of Weston, quarryman ; John Pearce, of Weston, 
^carpenter ; William Lake, of Weston, quarryman ; 
John Marwood, of Eeforne, shoemaker; William 
Gibbs, of Easton, farmer; William Andrews, of 
Easton, mason ; Bartholomew Hinde junior, of 
Southwell, quarryman ; John Lowman, of Southwell, 
quarryman ; William Lowman, of Southwell, quarry- 
man ; Thomas Lano Stone, of Southwell, quarryman ; 
David Symes, of Southwell, labourer ; Eichard 
Comben, of the Lighthouse; Eev. Simeon Noall 
and the Eev. Thomas Ashton, ministers. 

Another letter from Mrs. Brackenbury this year 
enclosed £5, — £1 for the dispensary, £2 for the 



DEVELOPMENT OF METHODISM 131 

Sunday schools, and £2 for " the poorest of our 
own little Hock." 

In another letter, in 1837, Mrs. Brackenbury 
sent £10 with a goose and a pie for Mr. Gibbs, a 
brace of birds and a pie for Mr. Ashton, and a 
pheasant and a brace of birds for Mr. and Mrs. 
Harrington. 

The Mr. and Mrs. Harrington referred to were 
the rector and his wife. There are several people 
living who can remember this good clergyman. 
He was instituted to the living in 1833, but his 
first sermon in Portland was preached on the 14th 
of January 1837 He was the first to establish a 
Sunday school in connection with the church here. 
So friendly and cordial were the relations between 
him and the Methodists, that it was arranged that 
the children attending the Wesleyan Sunday schools, 
which met in the morning, should attend the 
school meeting in the church in the afternoon. 

With this information, we are not surprised to 
learn that on the 28th of June 1838, which was 
kept as a national holiday, bring the day of the 
Queen's coronation, all the Sunday-school children 
in the island attended service in the church. 



i 3 2 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

After the service, they were taken down on the 
beach, where cake and tea had been provided, and 
between seven and eight hundred were present. 



THE WRECK OF A MISSIONARY SHIP 

The close of the year 1838 was marked by 
some terrible shipwrecks, one of which had special 
and peculiar interest to Methodists. We refer to 
the ill-fated schooner which had left Gravesend on 
the 22nd of November bound for West Africa. 
There sailed in her the newly- married missionary 
*and his wife, the Rev. Edward and Mrs. Peard. 

On the 29 th she became a total wreck on the 
Chisel Beach, and all on board, numbering sixteen 
or seventeen persons, perished. The bodies of 
thirteen or fourteen were recovered, and buried on 
the 3rd of December in the parish churchyard, and 
amongst them the reverend missionary. 

No one at Portland was at all aware who any 
of these poor people were. But when the news 
reached London, the Rev. Mr. Alder was sent 
down by the missionary authorities, who had heard 
of the sad event. 



THE WRECK OF A MISSIONARY SHIP 133 

After making inquiries, he learned that one of 
the bodies recovered answered in description to 
that of the missionary, and with the necessary- 
authority had the body exhumed and re-buried in 
the chapel graveyard at Fortune's Well. His 
funeral sermon on that occasion was preached from 
the text, " Christ in you the hope of glory." 

Some days later, the body of Mrs. Peard was 
recovered, and on the 26th of December buried in 
the same grave with her husband. 

Under the influence of such sad events, as may 
be imagined, the year 1839 was ushered in with 
peculiar solemnity ; and Mrs. Brackenbury, writing 
from Portland to the daughter of Dr. Adam Clarke, 
says : — 

Everything I see has a connection with the past. Last 
Sunday evening, when more than two hundred souls were 
assembled to commemorate the dying love of the Saviour, 
when all was deep, solemn, grateful feeling, a ransomed 
spirit — one kindred with my own — seemed, yen, really did, 
hover near and mingle with the happy throng. To me, 
oh, how intimately present ! And many a one I doubt 
not were impressed with the sweet recollection that all they 
knew instrumentally of God they owed to the former 
ministrations of that most beloved messenger of mercy. He 
found the whole island in the region and shadow of death ; 



i 3 4 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

he told them of Him who came to give His life for the 
world's salvation. Many refused, rej ected, despised ; but thank 
God many believed, were saved, and they are now united 
in celebrating together the praises of the Triune Deity. 

This year was a centenary year — the hundredth 
anniversary of the establishment of Methodism by 
John Wesley, and was suitably commemorated in 
Portland. 

I should like to give word for word the record 
of it as I have found it written by Mr. Lowman. 

October 25th, 1839, was a day set apart by the Methodists 
throughout the world for thanksgiving and prayer for what 
the Lord had done for us as a people since the first Society 
v&s formed a hundred years ago. It was the first centenary 
year of Methodism. I well remember the day. In the 
morning we had a blessed prayer-meeting at Southwell, and 
at noon. In the evening, Mr. John Wesley Thomas preached 
in the chapel at Fortune's Well. 

On Monday the 28th the Society met at our chapel to take 
cake and tea together. In the evening, at half-past six o'clock, 
the public meeting commenced, and a large congregation 
assembled. Mr. Thomas preached from the 90th Psalm. 

The Kev. John Wesley Thomas is remembered 
as a man of considerable ability, and one who 
found time to go beyond the ordinary duties of a 
circuit minister, as a teacher and lecturer. 



CENTENARY COMMEMORATION 135 

During his stay at Portland he started a young 
men's improvement class, and this with others was 
attended by Mr. William Lowman, Mr. Marwood, 
and one other who yet remains with us — I refer 
to Brother Thomas Attwooll, of Wakeham. 

On the 1st of July of this year the foundation 
stone of St. John's Church was laid at Fortune's 
Well. 

In the following year the churchyard of St. 
George's was enlarged. 



CHAPTER X 

THE JUBILEE OF METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

We have now reached the year 1841, the year of 
jubilee of the establishment of Methodism in 
Portland. This to the Society at Portland was 
altogether a special year, and was suitably kept by 
them. 

Mrs. Brackenbury was here to help with her 
purse and her counsels. Her generous heart 
suggested and carried out the gift of a Bible to 
every scholar in our schools, and when we re- 
member that the Methodist Sunday schools were 
at this time the oldest and largest, we are not 
surprised to find these Bibles to-day in many 
families who belong to the Established Church. 

We learn from the old Sunday-school register 
that Mr. Marwood was superintendent at Fortune's 
Well, and Mr. John Lowman at Wakeham, and 

136 



JUBILEE OF METHODISM IN PORTLAND 137 

that there were in the schools 176 female 
scholars, and 152 males — a total of 328, with 
60 teachers. 

Most of those whose names were on the old 
register have passed away. Some we remember as 
teachers in our early days. A few, however, still 
remain with us. 

When the centenary celebration services were 
held, we were able to say respecting the " top hill " 
portion, that two whose names were on the old 
register as scholars were still in the school, but 
then as teachers — Mr. Eobert Flann and Mr. 
John Skinner. Since then we have had to mourn 
the loss of Mr. Skinner, who has been called to 
his reward. 

The year following the jubilee, Mrs. Brackenbury 
wrote to Mr. Gibbs this letter, which it will be 
appropriate to insert. It reads thus : — 

Dec. 7th, 1842. 

Dear Friend, — Our annual greeting is once more allowed 
to us by the most indulgent providence of God. 

I have just been reading the Life of Edward Miller, written 
by James Dixon. Do get the preacher to write for it to come 
with the next book parcel, and please to pay for it out of the 
money I hope to send you at Christmas. If Mr. Olver has 



138 MET-HODISM IN PORTLAND 

not read it, you can lend it to him, and let Charles Whittle 
see it, and any of the friends. 

I should like the children of the Sunday schools to be told 
that it is my wish for every one of them who had Bibles given 
to them, to bring each one his or her Bible to school on 
Christmas Day, in order that the teachers may see that the 
books are kept in good condition, etc. 

I hope to write you again a day or two before Christmas 
Day, or a day or two after. 

One hare is for Mr. and Mrs. Olver, a pie for Friend Flew. 
I hope you will accept the rest. 

Is Marjory still living 1 I send the cotton handkerchief for 
her. — Your sincere Friend, S. Brackenbury. 

The year before the good lady died, she wrote 
this letter, addressed to Mr. Wm. Gibbs and Kobert 
Hinde. It was to send a birthday gift to her dear 
friends at Portland. 

To William Gibbs and Kobert Hinde. 

My dear Christian Friends, — As a token of my love for 
the prosperity of the cause of God in Portland, I enclose a 
note for the sum of one hundred pounds, to be faithfully 
applied in such way as the trustees of the chapel and 
schoolhouse shall judge best, for giving permanent assistance 
to the cause of religion as under the direction of those who 
shall or may have the management of the affairs of Methodism 
in the island of Portland, and accompanied with earnest 
prayer that the whole of the present members of that Society 
and their children and children's children may ever lend 



THE FIRST METHODIST DAY SCHOOL 139 

their best support to that gospel which will make all future 
generations blessed. 

With most sincere Christian love to yourselves and the 
whole Society, and grateful remembrance of your kind 
regard, I am, your faithful Friend, 

S. Brackenbury. 
Raithby Hall, May the 9th, 1846. 

May 9th the birthday of my most beloved husband and 
your faithful endeared friend and pastor. 



THE FIRST METHODIST DAY SCHOOL 

I have travelled over the first fifty years of 
Methodism in Portland, and feel that it would be 
unwise for me to attempt a record of the years that 
follow, as very much will be within the recollection 
of many, and lack that interest which the older 
times possess. It will not be out of place, however, 
to note a special instance of the development of 
Methodism about this time. 

In addition to all that had been done by Mr. 
and Mrs. Brackenbury, we must also place the 
erection of the day school at Fortune's Well. 

On the 27th of May 1844, Mrs. Brackenbury 
invited a few friends to meet at the minister's 



140 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

house, to consult about the desirability of building 
a schoolroom. With Mrs. Brackenbury was present 
on this occasion her brother, known to the Society 
here as " Squire Holland." 

The result of this conference was the determina- 
tion to build a room which should be sixty feet by 
thirty feet. Mrs. Brackenbury started a subscrip- 
tion towards it with £30, and a further sum of 
£120 was collected among the friends. For its 
erection the tender of Mr. John Pearce (of Weston) 
was accepted for the sum of £173. The foundation 
stone was laid on the 1st of September of the same 
year. It was completed and formally opened on 
the 15th of May 1845. 

A public tea was provided, and 380 persons were 
present — so many, indeed, that some had to be 
served in the minister's house, and others in the 
garden adjoining. 

The speakers who addressed the after-meeting 
were the Kevs. Thomas Bersey and Jacob Stanley, 
circuit ministers, and Messrs. J. Sherren, W 
Edwards, and H. Eaggett. 

The land upon which the school was built was 
purchased on the 10th of January 1822, and then 



DEATH OF MRS. BRACKENBURY 141 

described as " Tilley Coorube," one and a half acres, 
and the price paid, £100. 

Eespecting Methodism in the village of Weston, 
I have not learnt that any house was regularly 
licensed for religious worship, as was the case in 
the other villages ; but it will be seen by the 
Appendix that a Society class had been held here 
as early as 1798. 

The house of a Mr. William Attwooll was looked 
upon as the centre of Methodism in this village. 
The old house still remains, but a blacksmith's shop 
stands in front of it to-day. 

It was frequently honoured by the presence of 
Mrs. Brackenbury, and doubtless of Mr. Brackenbury, 
but of the latter I have no certain information. 

DEATH OF MRS. BRACKENBURY 

Two years after the erection of the day school 
the Methodist Society had to mourn the loss of 
their kind and generous friend. The following 
extract is from Memoirs of the Brackenburys : — 

The calm sunset of Mrs. Brackenbury 's course was in 
unison with her life. Her lamp was trimmed with renewed 
supplies of sanctifying grace. 



1 42 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

In person Mrs. Brackenbury was of commanding presence 
and of dignified demeanour, nor was it possible to glance at 
her aspect without a tacit conviction of that superiority of 
character which a more intimate acquaintance confirmed. 

Mrs. Brackenbury, while awaiting her final summons, went 
forth to meet her Lord on the 12th day of June 1847. 

We are pleased to know that, like her generous 
husband, Portland was a cherished memory with 
her to the last. 

Among the legacies her last will contained were 
the following in favour of the Methodist Society at 
Portland: — £100 to the School; 19 guineas to 
the Sunday School ; 1 9 guineas to the Poor of 
the Society; and 19 guineas to the Poor of the 
Island. 

These sums have been distributed among the 
various persons for whom they were intended, with 
the exception of a moiety of the 19 guineas for 
the poor of the Society, which came to the 
Easton branch of the circuit. 

This sum the officials here have invested for the 
same purpose, with the hope that it will form a 
nucleus to be added to by generous friends in the 
future. 



THE CENTENARY OF METHODISM 143 

THE CENTENARY OF METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

It will not perhaps be thought out of place if, 
in conclusion, I give a few figures which may be of 
interest. 

Going back to the time when William Nelson 
came to the island, we find the population was 
about 2000, and the number of ratepayers about 
120. Fifty years later, at the time of Mr. 
Brackenbury's visit, it had only increased a few. 
In 1841 the number had reached 2853, but in 
the twenty years following it had advanced to 
8468. This great increase was, of course, due to 
the Government works in the island. 

I have come across an interesting entry in an 
old parish rate book, setting forth the number of 
houses in Portland in the year 1782 — just nine 
years before Mr. Brackenbury's visit — and I will 
give it in each village as given in the book : — 

Southwell, 27; Weston, 15; Wakeham, 47; 
Easton, 64; Fortune's Well, 27; Chiswell, 100: 
total, 280. 

To-day there are about 1300 houses, including 
52 public-houses. 



144 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

In the year 1698 the number of ratepayers 
was 80. 

Respecting Methodism, we may say that when 
Mr. Brackenbury came in 1791 it is probable 
there was not a Methodist in the island. The 
little Society nursed by William Nelson, and 
spoken of by Charles Wesley, had probably 
become extinct upon the removal by death of 
William Nelson. 

In 1793, Mr. Brackenbury writing to a friend 
said, "We have about fifty members." Before 
Mr. Smith left in April 1794, he said, "One hun- 
dred and twenty had left the enemy's camp, and 
declared openly for the Lord." To-day we have in 
our own branch of the Methodist Church in Portland 
about 340 members, 791 Sunday scholars and 
101 teachers, with 5 chapels and 2 flourishing day 
schools, in which are 399 scholars. There are also 
over 500 members in the Bands of Hope connected 
with the circuit. 

But we claim all the Nonconformists in Portland 
to be children of the same parent church established 
by Mr. Brackenbury a hundred years ago. Includ- 
ing these, there will be over 600 church members, 



THE CENTENARY OF METHODISM 145 

1400 Sunday scholars, nearly 200 teachers, and 
a very large number of attendants whose names 
are not registered as members of Society. To all 
these may be added the new body of Christians — 
the Salvation Army. 

In the place of one solitary chapel, there are 
now ten chapels and three schoolrooms, besides 
the " Barracks " or meeting-place of the Salvation 
Army. 

As a memento of the centenary we were able 
to present each teacher and scholar in our Sunday 
schools with a Bible. Whilst we cannot but regret 
we had not a Mrs. Brackenbury to present them, 
we are able to rejoice in the happy possession of 
many good friends, some of whom shared with us 
the cost and the joy of providing the Bibles. 

I will now bid adieu to my readers, with the 

hope that they have been interested in the perusal 

of what I have written, — collected from many 

sources and by the kindness of many friends, — 

and that we may recognise our deep obligation to 

our departed friends, who have done so much for 

us as a Church. 

10 



146 METHODISM IN PORTLAND 

When we compare our present privileges and 
advantages with those of our forefathers, we cannot 
but feel grateful to that God who has shown us 
His loving kindness in all our lives, and be stimu- 
lated to greater diligence in the great work of the 
Church of our choice. 



Lo, our fathers' God is with us ! 

We can trace His mighty hand 
In our churches, vast in number, 

Wide extending o'er the land ; 
Let our full united chorus 

Ever downward roll along, 
And the year of time be vocal 

With our loud ecstatic song. 

Lo, our fathers' God is with us ! 

Lost in wonder, we adore 
Him who brought them safely hither 

With the gospel to our shore ; 
Fired with zeal and armed with courage 

Strong in faith and love divine, 
Through the darkest clouds that gathered 

They could see His glory shine. 

Lo, our fathers' God is with us ! 

They have laid their armour down, 
They have passed the Vale of Shadows 

Left the Cross to wear the Crown ; 



THE CENTENARY OF METHODISM 147 

We must bear their glorious standard, 

AVield our veteran fathers' sword, 
In the army of the faithful 

We are battling for the Lord. 

Lo, our fathers' God is with us ! 

Sing aloud with heart and voice, 
Still increasing and progressing, 

Brethren, let us all rejoice. 
Hallelujah ! what a meeting 

When we reach the shining shore, 
There with saints who've gone before us 

Shout free grace for evermore. 



APPENDIX 



1795. 



Poole Society. 

William Lonsdale 
Thomas Scott 
William Jones 
John Smith 
John Martin 
Thomas Wadham 
Wm. Gillingham 
John Millwood 
John Crabb 
William Troke 
Jos. Seymour 
John Knight 
John Ford 
James Kendall 
Mary Larcom 
Mary Millwood 
Sarah Collingwood 
Sarah Pike 
Sarah Steward 
Sua. Colborne 
Mary Bound 
Elizabeth Scott 
Elizabeth Bungey 
Sarah Bennett 



Mary King 
Sarah Moore 
Ann Ford 
Ann Clench 
Mary Wheller 
Sarah White 
Hannah Bailey 
Sarah Clarke 
Sarah Knight 
Mart. Harding 
Elizabeth Florence 
Catherine Daley 
Elizabeth Misher 
Judith Dyett 
Susannah Annise 



Long fleet. 

Edward Jones 
Martha Syms 
Lydia Syms 
Jane Bellows 
James Cobb 
Mary Cobb 
Robert Oatea 

149 



Thomas Stickland 
Elizabeth Medus 
George Roode 
Mary Roode 

Ham. 

Robert Stacy 
Elizabeth Stacy 
Susannah Joyner 
Love Franklin 
John Clench 

Monckton. 

William Clements 
Sarah Clements 
John Coleman 
Elizabeth Coleman 
Robert Wadham 
Hen. Barnes 
Ann Barnes 
Catherine Williams 
Elizabeth Cooke 
Mary Wadham 



*5° 



APPENDIX 



West Morden. 

William Clarke 
Mart. Clarke 
John Baskam 
Mary Baskam 
Ann Newman 
Chris. Mearing 
Sarah Gillard 
James Higt'ord 
Catherine Higford 
George Munden 
John Young 
Mart. Sellar 
William James 
Mary James 
Thomas Davis 
Elizabeth Davis 
Elizabeth Sellar 
Sarah Munden 
Elizabeth Young 
Sus. Perkins 



East Morden. 

John Barnes 
Mariah Barnes 
John Butler 
Ann Butler 
Elizabeth Harvey 
Samuel Lanham 
Elizabeth Goodwin 
Sarah Crumple 
Ben. Fry 
Ann Fry 
Elizabeth Cox 
Ann Jeffrey 
Dorothy Domini 
Sarah Scam m ell 
Jane Toms 
Mary Lilley 



POVINGTON. 

David Abbott 
Elizabeth Duell 
Ann Greening 
Mary Gibbons 
Jos. Marsh 



SWANAGE. 

John Marsh 
Thomas Stickland 
Robert Barnes 
Thomas Coleman 
Jos. Collins 
Andrew Mintern 
Robert Allford 
Ben. Bower 
Richard Tivitoe 
James Warren 
James Stickland 
Sarah Allford 
Ann Barnes 
Mary Mintern 
Elizabeth Stickland 
Sarah Collins 
Judith Coleman 
Martha Bower 
Rose Cull 
Sarah Cowper 
Elizabeth Coleman 
M. V. Hibbs 
Sarah Coleman 
Jane Cates 
Elizabeth Sanders 
Hester Stevens 



Blandford. 

John Harding 
John Rolls 



Fran. Herman 
Ann Twentyman 
Catherine Mahon 
Ann Harding 
Elizabeth Godwin 
Sarah Oliver 
Mart. Popler 
Elizabeth Nickols 
Sarah Rolls 
Ben. Rolls 
William Freeman 
Ben. Baverstock 
Charles Baverstock 
George Gale 
Mary Stickland 
Maria Oxford 
Elizabeth Kail 
Mary Hiscock 
A. M. Baverstock 
Thomas Ryall 
William Ryall 
Rachel Hill 
Mary Gale 
Mary Popler 



Grange or Creech. 

John Milled ge 
Thomas Abbott 
Jane Abbott 
Mary Hatchett 
Grace Hibbs 
Honour Pritchard 
John Lucas 
Mary Milledge 
Mary Hibbs 
Mary Seymour 
John Seymour 
Elizabeth Abbott 
Jane Kitcat 
Mary Lucas 



APPENDIX 



151 



Lytchet. 

William Lodge 
Elizabeth Lodge 
Ann Tucker 
Mary Hiscock 
Sarah Mayber 



John Parsons 
Han. Parsons 
George Maber 
John Doleman 
Sarah Doleman 
John Parsons 
Mary Parsons 



Matt. Hiscock 
Elizabeth Hiscock 
Jos. Osmond 
Sarah Osmond 
Elizabeth Butler 
Mary Ellis 
Jane Domini 



THE NAMES OF THE PEOPLE IN THE DIFFERENT 
SOCIETIES IN THE BLANDFORD CIRCUIT, 
EXCLUSIVE OF PORTLAND AND WEYMOUTH. 



June 1796. 
Bradle. 

David Abbott 
Elizabeth Duell 



Swan age. 

John Marsh 
Thomas Stickland 
Robert Barnes 
Thomas Coleman 
Joseph Collins 
Andrew Mintern 
Robert Alford 
Benjamin Bower 
Richard Tivitoe 
James Warren 
James Stickland 
Joseph Phippard 
James Sanders 
George Stickland 
John Toope 
George Hibbs 
Sarah Alford 
Ann Barnes 



Mary Mintern 
Elizabeth Stickland 
Sarah Collins 
Judith Coleman 
Martha Bower 
Rose Cull 
Elizabeth Coleman 
Margt. Viney Hibbs 
Sarah Coleman 
Elizabeth Sanders 
Hester Stevens 
Ann Phippard 
Martha Meader 
Ann Battrick 
Ann Meader 
Sarah Bonfield 
Eliz. Toope sen. 
Eliz. Toope jun. 



Grange or Creech 

John Milledge 
Thomas Abbott 
Jane Abbott 
Mary Hatchett 



Wm. Holmes. 

Grace Hibbs 
Honour Pritchard 
John Lucas 
Mary Lucas 
Mary Milledge 
Mary Hibbs 
Mary Seaman 
John Seaman 
Jane Kitcatt 
Frances Barnes 
William Seaman 



East Morden. 

John Barnes 
Maria Barnes 
John Butler 
Ann Butler 
Elizabeth Harvey 
Samuel Lanham 
Elizabeth Goodwin 
Sarah Crumpler 
Mary Slade 
Ben. Fry 
Ann Fry 



152 



APPENDIX 



East Morden — ctd. 

Elizabeth Cox 
Ann Jeffrey- 
Dorothy Domini 
Sarah Scammel 
Jane Thorns 



West Morden. 

William Clarke 
James Higford 
Martha Clarke 
John Baskam 
Mary Baskam 
Ann Newman 
Christiana M earing 
Sarah Gillard 
Catherine Higford 
George Munden 
Martha Sellar 
William James 
Mary James 
Sarah Munden 
Mabel Mearing 
Elizabeth Young 



Blandford. 

John Harding 
John Kolls 
Ben. Baverstock 
Francis Herman 
Ann Twentyman 
Catherine Mahon 
Ann Harding 
Elizabeth Godwin 
Elizabeth Oliver 

(removed) 
Martha Pipler 
Sarah Rolls, B.S, 



Francis Torgett 
Mary Gale 
Martha Coffen 
Mary Hiscock 
Ben. Rolls 
Charles Baverstock 
Margaret Stickland 
Elizabeth Kail 
Ann Baverstock 
Thomas Ryall, B.S. 
Marv Pipler 
William Ryall, B.S. 
Mary Stickland 



MONCKTON AND 
HlNTON. 

William Clements 
Sarah Clements 
John Coleman 
Elizabeth Coleman 
Henry Barnes 
Ann Barnes 
Catherine Williams 
Elizabeth Cooke 
James Maidment 
Robert Wadham 
Mary Wadham 
John Woodford 
Henry Pain 
Ruth Pain 
John Ford 
Joanna Ford 
Elizabeth Coombs 
Dinah Pain 



Elizabeth Lodge 
Mary Hiscock 
Sarah Maber 
George Maber 
John Parsons junior 
Hannah Parsons 
John Doleman 
Sarah Doleman 
Matthew Hiscock 
Elizabeth Hiscock 
John Parsons senior 
Mary Parsons 
Elizabeth Butler 
Jane Domini 
Mary Ellis 
Thomas Bessant 
Ann Doleman 
Susanna Perkins 



Lytchett. 

Joseph Osmond 
Sarah Osmond 



Poole. 

Thomas Scott 
John Martyn 
Thomas Wadham 
John Millwood 
John Crabbe 
William Troke 
John Ford 
Thomas Woodcock 
John Andrews 
Joseph Paine 
Samuel Lush 
Mary King 
Sarah Moore 
Ann Ford 
Ann Clench 
Sarah White 
Hannah Bailey 
Sarah Clarke 
Martha Harding 
Elizabeth Florence 



APPENDIX 



153 



Poole — dd. 

Catherine Daley 
Elizabeth Misher 
Judith Dyett 
Susanna Annise 
Mary Wellen 
Mary Rogers 
Mary Larcom 
Mary Millwood 
Sarah Collingwood 
Sarah Pike 
Sarah Steward 
Mary Bound 



Elizabeth Scott 
Sarah Bennett 
Ann Tucker 



LONGFLEET. 

Edward Jones 
Martha Symes 
Lydia Symes 
Jane Bellows 
James Cobb 
Mary Cobb 
Robert Oates 



Mary Hutchens 
John Read 



Ham. 

Robert Stacy 
Elizabeth Stacy 
Susanna Joyner 
Love Franklin 
John Clench 
Richard Davis 
Amelia Davis 



PERSONS' NAMES IN THE BLANDFORD CIRCUIT, 

June 1797. 



Weymouth. 

Samuel Weston 
Christina Calton 
James Keech 
William Avles 
Robert Trim 
Thomas Blissett 
Sarah Weston 
Mary Crawford 
Elizabeth Winter 
Mary Weston 
Ann Trim 
Sarah Keech 
Benedicta Lewis 
Susannah Trim 
Mary Fuzzard 

Portland. 

Philip Perchard 
Henry Stone 



Richard Comben 
William Russell 
Samuel Mitchell 
Robert Schollar 
Shadrac Stone 
Henry Attwooll 
Henry Pearce 
William Pearce 
Benjamin Hoff 
John Motyer 
William Angel 
Thomas Read 
Jos. Motyer 
William Pearce 
Thomas Ayles 
Robert Pearce 
Thomas Elliott 
J ohn Ayles Attwooll 
John Stone 
James Wallace 
Robert Holland 



Jenny Vine 
Catherine Winter 
Jane Read 
Sarah Wiggatt 
Alice Mitchell 
Nancy Read 
Mar. Mitchell 
Mary Russell 
Mary Pearce 
Jane Pearce 
Sarah Pearce 
Anna Schollar 
Catherine Stone 
Thomas Whittle 
William Lowman 
Abel Comben 
William Gibbs 
Robert Hinde 
Robert Hoskins 
Thomas Flew 
William Motyer 



154 



APPENDIX 



Portland — ctd. 

John Snook 
Jane Read 
Mary Jacob 
Grace Way 
Joan Winter 
Sarah Wiggatt 
Mary Winter 
Alice Attwooll 
Edith Attwooll 
Mary Read 
Sarah Winter 
Ann Shadwick 
Edith Angel 
Susannah Bennett 
Susannah Allen 
Mary Angel 
Mary Way 
Jane Perchard 
Rebecca Green 
Ann Muddle 
Elizabeth Bess 
Rebecca Wallis 
Grace Comben 
Sus. Lano 
Mary Discott 
Elizabeth White 
Grace Attwooll 
Dorothy Allen 
Mary Attwooll 
Mary Skinner 
Mary Stevens 
Tabitha Stevens 
Rebecca Skinner 
Ann Gibbs 
Elizabeth Pearce 
Ann Stevens 
Joan Motyer 
Ann Pearce 
Elizabeth Holland 
Agnes Pearce 
Rebecca Whittle 



John Marwood 
Jane Holland 
Mary Angel 
Elizabeth Hoff 
Grace Attwooll 
Rebecca Attwooll 
Mary Elliott 
Mary Stone 
Jane Attwooll 
Alice Shepherd 
Ann Newman 
Sarah Stone 
Agnes Attwooll 
Mary Pearce 
Rebecca Ayles 
Ann Mills 
Sarah Wallis 
Charles Whittle 
Hannah Whittle 
Mary Comben 
Hannah Whittle 
Elizabeth Studley 
Susannah Wallis 
Rebecca Comben 
Elizabeth Hinde 
Agnes Winter 
Sarah Wallis 
Elizabeth Anthony 
Mary Comben 



East Morden. 

John Barnes 
Maria Barnes 
John Butler 
Ann Butler 
Elizabeth Harvey 
Samuel Lanham 
Elizabeth Goodwin 
Sarah Crumpler 
Mary Slade 



Benj. Fry 
Ann Fry 
Elizabeth Cox 
Ann Jeffrey 
Sarah Scammell 
Jane Thorns 
Jos. James 
Dorothy Domini 



Lytchett. 

Jos. Osmond 
Sarah Osmond 
Elizabeth Lodge 
Mary Hiscock 
Sarah Maber 
George Maber 
John Parsons junior 
Hannah Parsons 
John Doleman 
Sarah Doleman 
Matthew Hiscock 
Elizabeth Hiscock 
John Parsons senior 
Elizabeth Butler 
Jane Domini 
Mary Ellis 
Susannah Parkins 
Mary Parsons 
Elizabeth Soper 
Ann Tucker 



Blandford. 

Ann Twentyman 
Ann Harding 
Ann Baverstock 
Catherine Mahon 
Elizabeth Godwin 
Elizabeth Kail 



APPENDIX 



J 55 



Blandford — ctd. 

Mary Pepler 
Maria Pepler 
Mary Hiscock 
Mary Gale 
Maria Stickland 
Mary Stickland 
Maria Coffen 
John Harding 
John Rolls 
Benjamin Rolls 
Charles Baverstock 
Benj. Baverstock 
Fran. Targett 
Fran. Hermin 



West Morden. 

William Clarke 
James Higford 
Mar. Clarke 
John Boskham 
Mary Boskham 
Ann Newman 
Chris. Mearing 
Sarah Gillard 
Catherine Higford 
George Munden 
Mar. Seller 
William James 
Mary James 
Sarah Munden 
Elizabeth Young 
Mabel Mearing 
William Ings 
William Harvey 



MoXCKTON. 

William Clements 
Sarah Clements 



John Coleman 
Elizabeth Coleman 
Henry Barnes 
Ann Barnes 
Catherine Williams 
Elizabeth Cook 
Joannah Maidments 
Robert Wadhani 
Mary Wadham 
John Woodford 
Henry Payne 
Ruth Payne 
John Ford 
Joannah Ford 
Elizabeth Coombs 



Creech. 

John Milledge 
Thomas Abbott 
Jane Abbott 
David Abbott 
Mary Hatchett 
Grace Hibbs 
Honour Pritchard 
John Lucas 
Mary Lucas 
Mary Milledge 
Mary Hibbs 
Mary Seaman 
John Seaman 
Jane Kitcat 
Frances Barnes 
William Seaman 
John Danning 



LONGFLEET. 



Edward Jones 
Mar. Symes 



Lydia Symes 
Jane Bellows 
Robert Oates 
Mary Hutchins 
Thomas Hutchins 



SWANAGE. 

John Marsh 
Thomas Stickland 
Robert Barnes 
Thomas Coleman 
Andrew Mintern 
Robert Alford 
Benj. Bower 
Richard Tivitoe 
James Stickland 
Jos. Phippard 
John Toope 
George Stickland 
George Hibbs 
Sarah Alford 
Ann Barnes 
Mary Mintern 
Elizabeth Stickland 
Mar. Bower 
Rose Cull 
Elizabeth Coleman 
Sarah Coleman 
Elizabeth Sanders 
Hester Stevens 
Ann Phippard 
Mar. Meader 
Ann Meader 
Ann Battrick 
Sarah Bonfield 
Eliz. Toope senior 
Eliz. Toope junior 
Mary Harlock 
Esther Haysom 



156 



APPENDIX 



Poole. 

Thomas Scott 
John Martyn 
Thomas Wadham 
John Millwood 
William Troke 
Thomas Woodcock 
Samuel Lush 
John Reed 
John Knight 
John Andrews 
Mary Millwood 
Sarah Collingwood 
Sarah Pike 
Sarah Steward 



Elizabeth Scott 
Sarah Bennett 
Hannah Bayley 
Elizabeth Capon 
Ann Newman 
Mary King 
Sarah Moore 
Ann Ford 
Ann Clench 
Sarah White 
Sarah Clarke 
Mar. Harding 
Elizabeth Florence 
Catherine Daley 
Elizabeth Miaher 
Judith Dyett 



Susannah Annise 
Mary Wellen 
Mary Rogers 
Mary Hounsell 
Susannah Colbrine 



Ham. 

Thomas Bessant 
Mary Bessant 
Robert Stacy 
Elizabeth Stacy 
SusaDnah Joyner 
John Clench 
Richard Davis 
Amelia Davis 



PERSONS' NAMES IN THE POOLE CIRCUIT, 

July 1798. 



Poole. 

Thomas Scott 
Thomas Woodcock 
John Read 
William Stevens 
Mary Millwood 
Sarah Collingwood 
Sarah Pike 
Sarah Steward 
Sarah Bennett 
Elizabeth Capon 
Hannah Goff 
Mary King 
Sarah Moore 
Ann Ford 
Ann Clench 
Sarah White 
Sarah Clark 



Martha Harding 
Elizabeth Florence 
Catherine Daley 
Elizabeth Misher 
Judith Dyett 
Susannah Annise 
Mary Hounsell 
Mary Weller 
Charles Weyman 
Elizabeth Scott 
Mary Robbins 
Mary Mundon 
Ann King 

Ham. 

Thomas Bessant 
Mary Bessant 
Robert Stacy 



Elizabeth Stacy 
Susannah Joiner 
Richard Davis 
Amelia Davis 

Longfleet. 

Ed. Jones 
Robert Oates 
George Rood 
Thomas Hutchings 
Martha Seymour 
Lydia Kite 
Mary Hutchings 
Jane Bellows 

Portland. 

John Marwood 
Mary Skinner 



APPENDIX 



157 



Portland — ctd. 

Mary Stevens 
Tabitha Stevens 
Ann Stevens 
Eebecca Skinner 
Ann Gibbs 
Elizabeth Pearce 
Elizabeth Holland 
Agnes Pearce 
Jane Motyer 
Ann Pearce 
Rebecca Whittle 
Jane Holland 
Agnes Winter 
Mary Hoskins 
Jane Ayles 
Sarah Wallis 
Jane Perchard 
Rebecca Green 
Ann Muddle 
Elizabeth Bass 
Rebecca Wallis 
Mary Discott 
Grace Attwooll 
Mary Attwooll 
Dorothy Allen 
Mary Angel 
Elizabeth Hoff 
Grace Attwooll 
Rebecca Attwooll 
Mary Elliott 
Mary Stone 
Jane Attwooll 
Alice Shephard 
Ann Newman 
Sarah Stone 
Agnes Attwooll 
Mary Pearce 
Rebecca Ayles 
Ann Mills 
Sarah Wallis 



Richard Comben 
William Russell 
Philip Perchard 
Henry Stone 
Samuel Mitchell 
Robert Schollar 
Shad. Stone 
Henry Attwooll 
Henry Pearce 
William Pearce 
Benj. Hoff 
Richard Bennett 
William Angel 
Thomas Read 
Jos. Motyer 
William Pearce 
Robert Pearce 
Thomas Ayles 
John Attwooll 
John Stone 
Samuel Wallis 
Robert Holland 
William Ayles 
Thomas Elliott 
Jane Vine 
Catherine Winter 
Jane Read 
Sarah Wiggatt 
Alice Mitchell 
Nancy Read 
Martha Mitchell 
Mary Russell 
Mary Pearce 
Jane Pearce 
Sarah Pearce 
Ann Schollar 
Catherine Stone 
Jane Read 
Mary Jacob 
Grace Way 
Joan Winter 
Sarah Wiggatt 



Mary Winter 
Alice Attwooll 
Edith Attwooll 
Mary Read 
Ann Chaddock 
Edith Angel 
Susannah Allen 
Mary Angel 
Mary Way 
Mary Stewerd 
Charles Whittle 
Hannah Whittle 
Mary Comben 
Han. Whittle junr. 
Rebecca Comben 
Elizabeth Hinde 
Sarah Wallis 
Susannah Wallis 
Elizabeth Anthony 
Mary Comben 
William Gibbs 
William Motyer 
Thomas Whittle 
Robert Hoskins 
Thomas Flew 
Abel Comben 



Weymouth. 

James Keech 
Robert Trim 
Matt. Rendle 
Samuel Weston 
James Shivering 
Jos. Fuzzard 
John Motyer 
Sarah Weston 
Sus. Trim 
Mary Fuzzard 
Benedicta Lewis 
Mary Crawford 



158 



APPENDIX 



Weymouth — dd. 

Elizabeth Winter 
Sarah Keech 
Charlotte Sawyer 
Mary Weston 



SWANAGE. 

John Marsh 
Thomas Stickland 
Robert Barnes 
Thomas Coleman 
Arthur Minton 
Robert Alford 
Benj. Bower 
Richard Tivitoe 
Jos. Phippard 
George Stickland 
John Toope 
Robert Hyson 
Arthur Phippard 
George Hibbs 
Sarah Alford 
Ann Barnes 
Mary Minton 
Elizabeth Stickland 
Martha Bower 
Rose Cull 
Sarah Coleman 
Elizabeth Sanders 
Esther Stevens 
Ann Phippard 
Martha Meader 
Sarah Bonfield 
Elizabeth Toope 
Elizabeth Burtt 
Mary Herlock 
Esther Hyson 
Mary Gent 
Jane Norman 



Grange. 

John Milledge 
Thomas Abbotts 
Jane Abbotts 
David Abbotts 
John Dunning 
Mary Hatchett 
Grace Hibbs 
Mary Hibbs 
John Lucas 
Mary Lucas 
Mary Seaman 
John Seaman 
William Seaman 
Frances Barnes 
Mary Milledge 
Elizabeth Jewel 



Morden. 

John Barnes 
Maria Barnes 
John Butler 
Ann Butler 
Elizabeth Harvey 
Samuel Lanham 
Elizabeth Godwin 
Sarah Crumpler 
Mary Slade 
Benj. Fry 
Elizabeth Cox 
Ann Jeffrey 
Dorothy Domini 
Sarah Scammell 
Jane Thorns 
Jos. James 
Mary Bascome 
Ann Fry 



East Morden. 

William Clarke 
Martha Clarke 
Jane Higford 
John Baskham 
Ann Newman 
Chris. Mearing 
Mabel Mearing 
Catherine Higford 
George Mundon 
Sarah Mundon 
Mary James 
William Ings 
Ann Ings 
William Harvey 
George Morris 
Elizabeth Morris 
Benjamin Collings 
Sarah Collings 
Martha Sellar 



Lytchett. 

Jos. Osmond 
Sarah Osmond 
Elizabeth Lodge 
Mary Hiscock 
Elizabeth Dyett 
George Maber 
John Parsons 
Hannah Parsons 
John Doleman 
Sarah Doleman 
Matt. Hiscock 
Elizabeth Hiscock 
John Parsons 
Mary Parsons 
Elizabeth Butler 
Jane Domini 
Mary Ellis 



APPENDIX 



i59 



Lttchett — ctd. 

Elizabeth Soper 
Michael Baalam 
Sarah Baalam 
Susannah Parkins 



Monckton. 

"William Clements 
Sarah Clements 
John Coleman 



Elizabeth Coleman 
Henry Barnes 
Ann Barnes 
Cath. Williams 
Elizabeth Cooke 
Jos. Maidment 
Kobert Whadham 
Mary Whadham 
William Bundey 
Thomas White 
William Ford 
John Ford 



Blandford. 

Ann Baverstock 
Catherine Mahon 
Elizabeth Goodwin 
Mary Hiscock 
John Reynolds 
Benj. Rolls 
BeDJ. Baverstock 
Francis Hermin 
John Rolls 
Samuel Lush 



NAMES OF THE PERSONS IN THE POOLE CIRCUIT, 

1799. 



Poole. 

Thomas Scott 
Thomas Woodcock 
John Read 
John Knight 
Thomas Bessant 
Mary Bessant 
Martha Sims 
Lydia White 
Richard Davis 
John Frampton 
Susan Steward 
Mary Millwood 
Sarah Bennett 
Elizabeth Stacy 
Susannah Joiner 
Francis Wheeler 
Ann King 
Mary King 
Sarah Moore 
Ann Ford 
Elizabeth Misher 



Mary Hounsell 
Elizabeth Florence 
Elizabeth Scott 
Mary Wheeler 
Charlotte Weyman 
Judith Dyett 
Martha Horden 
Mary Seller 
Hannah Goff 
Ann Clench 
Eliz. Frampton 
Mrs. Tullock 
Syb. Tumour 
Elizabeth Clark 
Catherine Daley 
Mary Wheeler 
Sarah Clark 
Susannah Annise 
Mary Braffitt 

Lytchett. 
Jos. Osmond 



Sarah Osmond 
Elizabeth Lodge 
Mary Hiscock 
Matt. Hiscock 
John Parsons 
Mary Parsons 
John Parsons 
Hannah Parsons 
John Dolman 
Sarah Dolman 
Elizabeth Soper 
Susannah Perkins 
Elizabeth Dyett 
Michael Balaam 
Sarah Balaam 
Elizabeth Hiscock 



West Morden. 

James Hickford 
Catherine Hickford 
Benjamin Collins 



i6o 



APPENDIX 



West Morden — dd. 

Sarah Collins 
George Morris 
George Mundon 
Sarah Mundon 
Elizabeth Morris 
Hannah Drake 
Mary James 
William Clark 
Martha Clark 
John Baskani 
Christiana Mearing 
Mabel Mearing 
William Ings 
Ann Ings 
William Harvey 
Hannah Keate 



East Morden. 

John Butler 
Ann Butler 
John Barnes 
Miriam Barnes 
Elizabeth Harvey 
Samuel Lanning 
Elizabeth Goodwin 
Elizabeth Slade 
Sarah Crumpler 
Elizabeth Cox 
Dorothy Dominy 
Benjamin Fry 
Ann Fry 
Jos. James 
Jane Thorns 
Mary Baskham 
Sarah Scammel 



Thomas Stickland 
Robert Barnes 
Thomas Coleman 
Robert Alford 
Benj. Bower 
Jos. Phippard 
John Toope 
Robert Hyson 
Anth. Phippard 
George Hibbs 
Timothy Burt 
Andrew Minton 
Sarah Alford 
Ann Barnes 
Elizabeth Stickland 
Sarah Coleman 
Ann Phippard 
Ann Meader 
Elizabeth Toope 
Elizabeth Burt 
Esther Hyson 
Jane Norman 
Martha Bower 
Elizabeth Sanders 
Mary Gent 



Swanage. 
John Marsh 



Grange. 

John Milledge 
Mary Milledge 
Thomas Abbott 
Jane Abbott 
David Abbott 
John Dunning 
Mary Hatchett 
Mary Hibbs 
John Lucas 
Mary Lucas 
John Seamen 
Mary Seamen 
Frances Barnes 
Mary Whiterow 



William Cure 
Mary Cure 

Wareham. 

John Stickland 
John Roberts 
Elizabeth Roberts 
Mary Shepherd 
Mary Mundon 



Monckton. 

William Clements 
Sarah Clements 
John Coleman 
Elizabeth Coleman 
Henry Barnes 
Ann Barnes 
Cath. Williams 
Elizabeth Cooke 
James Maidment 
Robert Wadham 
Mary Wadham 
William Bandy 
Thomas White 
William Ford 
John Ford 



Weymouth. 

Samuel Weston 
Robert Trim 
Sus. Trim 
James Keach 
Sarah Keach 
Sarah Stanton 
Benedicta Lewis 
James Shearing 
Mrs. Winter 



APPENDIX 



161 



Portland. 

Young Women's 
Class. 

Jane Read 
Mary Jacob 
Grace Way- 
Joan Winter 
Sarah Wiggatt 
Mary Winter 
Alice Attwooll 
Edith Attwooll 
Mary Read 
Ann Chaddock 
Edith Angel 
Susannah Allen 
Sarah Winter 
Martha Meader 

Saturday Night's 

Class 
(Brother Motyer's). 

William Angel 
Thomas Read 
Jos. Motyer 
William Pearce 
Thomas Ayles 
Robert Pearce 
John Ayles 
John Stone 
James Wall is 
William A vies 
Thomas Elliott 

Sunday's Cliapel. 

Rebecca Green 
Ann Muddle 
Elizabeth Bass 
Rebecca Wallis 
Mary Discott 
Grace Attwooll 



Mary Attwooll 
Mary Kelk 
Dorothy Allen 
Lucy Steward 

Sunday's, Wakeham. 

John Marwood 
Mary Skinner 
Mary Stevens 
Tabitha Stevens 
Rebecca Skinner 
Ann Gibbs 
Elizabeth Pearce 
Elizabeth Holland 
Agnes Pearce 
Ann Stevens 
Joan Motyer 
Ann Pearce 
Rebecca Whittle 
Agnes Winter 
Mary Hoskins 
Jane Ayles 
Sarah Wallis 
Elizabeth Barnes 
Elizabeth Stone 

Southwell Class. 

Charles Whittle 
Hannah Whittle 

senior 
Hannah Whittle 

junior 
Mary Comben 
Susannah Wallis 
Sarah Wallis 
Elizabeth Anthony 

Thursday's Class. 

Richard Comben 
William Russell 



Henry Stone 
Samuel Mitchell 
Robert Scholler 
Shad. Stone 
William Pearce 
Benjamin Hoff 
Richard Bennett 



Weston Class. 

William Motyer 
William Gibbs 
Thomas Flew 
Thomas Whittle 
Abel Comben 



Sunday's Class 
(Brother Angel's). 

Mary Angel 
Elizabeth Hoff 
Grace Attwooll 
Rebecca Attwooll 
Jane Attwooll 
Mary Stone 
Alice Shepherd 
Ann Newman 
Sarah Stone 
Agnes Attwooll 
Mary Pearce 
Rebecca Ayles 
Ann Mills 
Sarah Wallis 



Sunday's 
(Brother Read's). 

Jane Vine 
Catherine Winter 
Jane Read 



XI 



162 



APPENDIX 



Portland — dd. 

Sunday's 
(Bro. Read's) — dd. 

Sarah Wiggatt 



Alice Mitchell 
Nancy Read 
Martha Mitchell 
Mary Russell 
Mary Pearce 



Jane Pearce 
Sarah Pearce 
Hannah Scholler 
Catherine Stone 
Sarah Winter 



Names of Places. 


_ u 

H 

Hi 


05 




05 

o 

S 

05 


m 


0} 05 

103 
40 
26 
15 
17 
19 
17 
16 
5 
9 


Yearly 

Col- 
lection. 


Kingswood 
Collection. 


Collection 
for Notting- 
ham Poor- 
house. 


Portland 

Poole 

Swanage 

Moncktou 

E. Morden 

W. Morden 

Lytchett 

Grange 

Wareham 

Weymouth 


"i 

"i 
1 
1 


3 

7 
1 

"i 

"a 
5 


J 

5 

"i 

2 

1 

"7 


6 

2 
2 

i" 
1 


"i 


£ s. d. 
1 12 6 
14 6 
80 

"j 
3 
8 
11 

15 


£ s. d. 

17 9 

18 
8 6 

*5 
2 6 
9 10 

ii 6 


£ s. d. 

1 "4 9 
5 10 

14 11 

"9 
6 10 


Total 


4 


20 ! 26 12 


l 


267 


4 19 


4 13 1 


3 1 4 



NAMES OF SUBSCRIBERS FOR THE " METHODIST 
MAGAZINE " IN THE POOLE CIRCUIT FOR 1799. 



Poole. 

Mr. Street 
Mrs. Millwood 
William Wills 
Henry Matthews 
Sarah Clarke 
Mr. Woodcock 
Mary Hounsell 
Mrs. Moore 
Mrs. Richards 



Ed. Byron 
Mr. Frampton 
Mr. John Read 
Mr. Simper 
Mrs. Tullock 
Mrs. Weyman 
Ann Holland 
Mr. Jones 



Monckton, 3. 



Morden. 

Mr. Higford 
Mr. Mearing 
Mr. Dominy 
Mr. Clark 
Mr. Lanham 
Mr. Barnes 
Mrs. Blake 
Mr. Butler 
Mr. Smith 
George Morris 



APPENDIX 



163 



Lytchett. 

Jos. Osmond 
John Parsons 
George Maber 
Bichard Oliver 
Mr. Foster 



Wareham. 
Mr. Roberts 

Swanage. 

Mr. Barnes 
Jos. Phippard 
Mr. Hibbs 
Mr. Marsh 
Robert Alford 



Mrs. Gent 
George Stickland 
Howard Collings 
Jos. Sanders 
Robert Hyson 



Grange. 

Mr. Abbott 
Mr. Lucas 
Mr. Seaman 
Mr. Dunning 
Mr. Windsor 



Ham. 

Mr. Bessant 
Mrs. Joiner 



Portland. 

John Marwood 
William Gibbs 
Jos. Motyer 
William Russell 
Thomas Ayles 
Benjamin Hoff 
Mary Pearce 
Sarah Wiggatt 
Francis Pearce 
Mrs. Steward 
Henry Pearce 

Weymouth. 

Samuel Weston 
Mr. Steward 
Mr. Tizzard 
Ann Greening 
Mrs. Sawyer 
Mr. Dayton 



Total, 70 Subscribers. 



NAMES OF PERSONS IN SOCIETY IN THE POOLE 
CIRCUIT, June 1800. 



Poole. 

Thomas Woodcock 
Thomas Scott 
John Read 
Thomas Bessant 
Mary Bessant 
Richard Davis 
John Frampton 
Fran. Wheeler 
Mary Millwood 
Sarah Bennett 
Elizabeth Stacy 



Susannah Joiner 
Ann King 
Richard Lacy 
Mr. Jones 
Mr. Jones junior 
Eleanor Woodcock 
Mrs. Hanham 
Mrs. Milward 
Mary King 
Ann Ford 
Mary Hounsel 
Elizabeth Scott 
Elizabeth Wheeler 



Charlotte Weyman 
Judith Dyett 
Martha Hurden 
Hannah Goff 
Ann Clench 
Elizabeth Frampton 
Jane Tullock 
Mrs. Daley 
Elizabeth Misher 
Elizabeth Florence 
Sophia Mackerel 
Mary Pitt 
Ann Wessell 



164 



APPENDIX 



Portland. 

Saturday's 
(Jenny Read's). 

Jane Read 
Mary Jacob 
Grace Way 
Joan Winter 
Sai*ah Wiggatt 
Alice Attwooll 
Mary Read 
Edith Attwooll 
Ann Chaddock 
Edith Angel 
Susannah Allen 
Sarah Moty er 
Martha Meader 
Mary Dismow 

Saturday's 
(Brother Motyer's). 

William Angel 
Thomas Read 
Jos. Motyer 
William Pearce 
Thomas Ayles 
John Ayles 
James Wallis 
William Ayles 

Sunday Afternoon 
(Brother Angel's). 

Mary Angel 
Elizabeth Hoff 
Grace Attwooll 
Agnes Attwooll 
Mary Stone 
Alice Shepherd 
Ann Newman 
Sarah Stone 
Mary Pearce 



Rebecca Ayles 
Ann Mills 
Sarah Wallis 

Sunday Afternoon 
(Chapel). 

Rebecca Green 
Mary Kelk 
Dorothy Allen 
Lucy Steward 
Rebecca Wallis 
Ann Muddle 
Elizabeth Bass 

Sunday Afternoon 
(Jenny Bead's). 

Jane Vine 
Catherine Winter 
Jane Read 
Sarah Wiggatt 
Alice Mitchell 
Nancy Read 
Mary Russell 
Mary Pearce 
Jane Pearce 
Sarah Pearce 
Hannah Schollar 
Catherine Stone 

Thursday Class. 

Richard Comben 
William Russell 
Henry Stone 
Samuel Mitchell 
William Pearce 
Benjamin Hoff 
Richard Bennett 
Robert Schollar 



Southwell. 

Charles Whittle 
Hannah Whittle 

senior 
Hannah Whittle 
Mary Comben 
Susannah Wallis 
Sarah Wallis 
Elizabeth Anthony 

Wakehanx Class. 

John Marwood 
Mary Skinner 
Mary Stevens 
Tabitha Stevens 
Rebecca Skinner 
Ann Gibbs 
Elizabeth Pearce 
Elizabeth Holland 
Agnes Pearce 
Ann Stevens 
Joan Motyer 
Ann Pearce 
Rebecca Whittle 
Agnes Winter 
Mary Hoskins 
Elizabeth Stone 

Weston Class. 

William Gibbs 
Thomas Whittle 
Abel Comben 
Thomas Flew 
William Motyer 

Weymouth. 

Samuel Weston 
Robert Trim 
James Keech 



APPENDIX 



165 



Weymouth — ctd. 

James Sherring 
Elizabeth Winter 
Sarah Keech 
Mary Angel 
Mary Weston 
Grace Attwooll 
Elizabeth Barnes 



Lytchett. 

Jos. Osmond 
Sarah Osmond 
Elizabeth Lodge 
Mary Hiscock 
Matthew Hiscock 
Elizabeth Hiscock 
John Parsons 
Mary Parsons 
John Parsons, jun. 
Hannah Parsons 
John Dolman 
Sarah Dolman 
Elizabeth Soper 
Susannah Parkins 
Elizabeth Dyett 
Michael Balaam 
Sarah Balaam 



Monckton. 

William Clement 
Sarah Clement 
John Coleman 
Elizabeth Coleman 
Henry Barnes 
Ann Barnes 
Catherine Williams 
Elizabeth Coke 
James Maid incut 



William Bundy 
Thomas White 
William Ford 
John Brewer 
William Brewer 
Miss Boberts 
Samuel James 
John Perry 
Edward Laws 
William Mowdy 
Bobert Wadham 
Mary Wadham 
John Ford 
Joanna Ford 
Elizabeth Cumbs 
Hannah Stacy 
Elizabeth Payne 
Sarah Butler 



Morden. 

James Hickford 
Catherine Hickford 
George Morris 
Elizabeth Morris 
George Munden 
Sarah Munden 
Benjamin Collins 
Hannah Drake 
Marv James 
William Clark 
Martha Clark 
John Baskham 
Christiana Mearing 
Mabel Mearing 
William Ings 
Ann Ings 
William Harvey 
Hannah Keate 
Laur. Langdown 
Mary Pike 
John Barnes 



Maria Barnes 
John Butler 
Ann Butler 
Elizabeth Harvey 
Samuel Laning 
Elizabeth Goodwin 
Sarah Crumpler 
Martha Slade 
Benj. Fry 
Ann Fry 
Elizabeth Cox 
Dorothy Dominy 
Sarah Scammel 
Jane Thomas 
Mary Bascomb 
George Laning 



Wareham. 

John Stickland 
John Roberts 
Elizabeth Roberts 
Mary Shepherd 



Swanage. 

John Marsh 
Thomas Stickland 
Robert Barnes 
Thomas Coleman 
Robert Alford 
Jos. Phippard 
George Hibbs 
John Toope 
Robert Hyson 
Anthony Phippard 
Timothy Burt 
Andrew Minton 
Charles Meader 
Sarah Alford 



i66 



APPENDIX 



'Swan age — ctd. 

Ann Barnes 
Elizabeth Stickland 
Sarah Briggs 
Ann Phippard 
Ann Meader 
Elizabeth Toope 
Elizabeth Burt 
Esther Hyson 



Jane Norman 
Mary Gent 

Grange. 

John Milledge 
Mary Milledge 
Thomas Abbott 
Jane Abbott 
David Abbott 



John Danning 
Mary Hatcherd 
Mary Hibbs 
John Seamen 
Mary Seamen 
Mary Lucas 
Fran. Barnes 
Mary Whiterow 
William Cure 
Mary Cure 



NAMES OF SUBSCRIBERS FOR "THE MAGAZINES" 
IN THE POOLE CIRCUIT, 1800. 



Portland. 

Jos. Motyer 
Mary Pearce 
Sarah Wiggatt 
Mrs. Steward 
John Marwood 
Fran. Pearce 
William Gibbs 
Benj. Hoff 
Mr. Ayles 
Edith Stone 
William Russell 



Wyke. 

Betsy Barnes 
Edward Tullage 



Weymouth. 

Mr. Weston 
Mr. Tizzard 



James Sherring 
Ann Greening 
Susannah Trim 
Mr. Steward 
Mr. Drayton 



Monckton. 

Mrs. Williams 
Robert Wadham 
John Coleman 



Grange. 

John Milledge 
William Cure 
Mr. Abbott 
Mrs. Lucas 
Elizabeth Richards 
Mrs. Barnes ■* 
John Seamen 



Swanage. 

Mr. Marsh 
Mrs. Gent 
Timothy Burt 
Mrs. Barnes 
John Phippard 
Hannah Bart 



Lytchett. 

Jos. Osmond 
John Parsons 
Richard Oliver 
George Maber 
Mr. Foster 



Blandford. 
Charles Bavingstock 

Wareham. 
Mr. Roberts 



APPENDIX 



167 



MORDEN. 

William Clark 
Mr. Butler 
Samuel Laning 
John Barnes 
Robert Dominy 
George Morris 
Mr. Mearing 
Mr. Smith 
Mrs. Blake 



Mr. Hickford 
Laur. Langdown 

Poole. 

Mr. Frampton 
Mrs. Tullock 
Mr. Scott 
Mrs. Ford 
Mrs. Milwood 



Mrs. Richards 
Sarah Clarke 
Mr. Street 
Mrs. Moor 
Thomas Woodcock 
Mrs. Pitt 
John Read 
Mr. Lacey 
John Brewer 
Miss Mackerel 
Mr. Byron 



Total, 71 Subscribers. 



Plan. 



1800. 



Collections. 



Names of Places. 


Local 
Preachers. 


CO 

u 

> IB 


« t-. 

ms 


> 

O 

s 


OS 




Yearly 
Col- 
lection 


Kingswood 
Collection. 


Collection 

for the 
Conference. 


Poole 
Portland . 

Weymouth 
Grange 
Swanage 
Lytchett 

, Mordens 
Monckton 

j Wareham 


"i 

1 

"i 
i 


6 
1 
3 

*3 

... 

3 

12 


7 
7 
2 

3 

"i 


3 

5 
1 

2" 

l" 


1 

3 

"i 
"i 


37 
89 
11 
15 
24 
17 
37 
27 
4 


£ s. d. 
12 
1 11 
4 
12 6 
3 6 
6 6 
14 
19 


£ s. d. 
17 6 
16 
10 6 
8 3 
3 8 
5 6 
11 6 
12 10 


£ s. d, 
10 6 
18 

*8 
10 6 
7 1 
16 6 


| Total 


4 


28 


20 


12 


6 


261 


5 12 6 


5 5 9 


4 10 7 



i68 



APPENDIX 



THE NAMES OF THE SOCIETIES AND MEMBERS 



IN POOLE CIRCUIT, 1802. 



Portland. 

Men's Saturday 
Night Class. 

William Angel 
Thomas Read 
Joseph Motyer 
William Pearce 
Thomas Ayles 
John Ayles 
James Wallis 
William Gibbs 
Thomas Flew 
Robert Hoskins 



Wakeham Class. 

John Marwood 
Mary Skinner 
Rebecca Skinner 
Tabitha Stevens 
Ann Qibbs 
Elizabeth Pearce 
Ann Pearce 
Mary Hoskins 
Elizabeth Stone 
Jane Raiment 



Weston Class. 

Joan Motyer 
Mary Stevens 
Ann Stevens 
Rebecca Comben 
Mary Comben 
Agnes Pearce 



Women's Saturday 
Night. 

Mary Jacob 
Joan Winter 
Grace Way 
Sarah Wiggatt 
Jane Scoble 
Edith Stone 
Marv Read 
Ann Stone 
Edith Angel 
Susannah Allen 
Lydia Motyer 
Mary Dismore 
Hannah Goff 
Mary Schollar 
Margery Attwooll 



Sunday Class 
(Brother Angel's). 

Elizabeth Hoff 
Grace Attwooll 
Agnes Attwooll 
Mary Stone 
Alice Shepherd 
Ann Newman 
Sarah Stone 
Mary Pearce 
Rebecca Ayles 
Ann Mills 
Susannah Spencer 
Alice Attwooll 
Mary Angel 
Sarah Stanton 



Sunday Class ( Chapel 

Rebecca Green 
Dorothy Allen 
Lucy Steward 
Rebecca Wallis 
Ann Muddle 
Elizabeth Bess 
Martha Truscott 
Sarah Motyer 
Mary Winter 
Agnes Mills 

Thursday's Class 
(Chapel). 

Richard Comben 
William Russell 
Henry Stone 
Samuel Mitchell 
William Pearce 
Benj. Hoff 
Richard Bennett 
Robert Schollar 
John Motyer 

Southwell Class. 

Charles Whittle 
Hannah Whittle sen. 
Hannah Whittle jun. 
Sarah Wallis 
Elizabeth Anthony 
Rebecca Comben 

Sunday Class 
(Brother Russell's). 

Catherine Winter 
Jane Vine 



APPENDIX 



169 



Portland — ctd- 

Sunday Class 
(Bro. RusseWs)—cta\ 

Jane Head 
Sarah Wiggatt 
Alice Mitchell 
Nancy Read 
Mary Pearce 
Mary Pearce 
Sarah Pearce 
Jane Pearce 
Catherine Stone 



Poole. 

Friday's Class. 

Thomas Scott 
J. N. Frampton 
Thomas Woodcock 
William Cartridge 
John Martin 
William Lodge 
James Dorey 
Elizabeth Scott 
Thomas Bywater 
Robert Stickland 
Francis Wheeler 
John Braffitt 
Samuel Bellows 
John Knight 
William Hull 

Monthly's Class. 

Mary King 
Ann Ford 
Mary Hounsel 
Susannah Wheeler 
Charlotte Weyinan 
Judith Dyett 



Elizabeth Frampton 
Jane Tullock 
Catherine Daley 
Elizabeth Misher 
Susannah Annise 
Sarah Bird 
Eleanor Woodcock 
Eleanor Brown 
Elizabeth Larcom 
Elizabeth Scott 
Mary Braffitt 
Mary Commons 
Mrs. Butler, alias 

Wills 
Mrs. Barnes 
Mrs. Bound 
Mrs. Hull 
Sus. Colbourne 

Sunday's Class. 

James Hickford 
Catherine Hickford 
John Reed 
Richard Davies 
Ann King 
Mary Millwood 
Jane Hannan 
Mary Woodcock 
Elizabeth Meddes 
Martha Simms 



East Morden. 

John Barnes 
Maria Barnes 
John Butler 
Ann Butler 
Elizabeth Harvey 
Samuel Laning 
Martha Slade 
Sarah Crumpler 



Ann Fry 
Elizabeth Cox 
Dorothy Dominy 
Jane Thomas 
Mary Bascomb 
George Laning 



West Morden. 

William Clarke 
Martha Clarke 
John Baskhani 
Christiana Mearing 
Mabel Mearing 
William Ings 
Ann Ings 
William Harvey 
Lawrence Langdown 
Mary Pike 
Hannah Hatcherd 
Elizabeth Godwin 
Sarah Scammell 
Mary James 
George Morris 
Betty Morris 
Hannah Drake 
George Munden 
Sarah Munden 
Henry Foster 
William Fry 
James Baker 
Moses Baker 



Lytchett. 

Joseph Osmond 
Sarah Osmond 
Elizabeth Lodge 
Mary Hiscock 
John Parsons 



170 



APPENDIX 



Lytchett — ctd. 

Hannah Parsons 
John Dolman 
Sarah Dolman 
Elizabeth Soper 
John Parsons 
Mary Parsons 
Susannah Parkins 
Judith Dyett 
Michael Balam 
Sarah Balam 
Elizabeth Hiscock 
Elizabeth Foster 
Elizabeth Plowman 
John Heed 
Mary Reed 
Jane Whaddon 



Blandford. 

John Reynolds 
A. M. Baverstock 
Ben. Baverstock 
Charles Baverstock 
John Rolls 
Benj. Rolls 
Mrs. Godwin 
Catherine Mahon 
Elizabeth Coombs 
Mary Compton 
Jane Compton 
I number only 10 



Stourpaine. 

John Haine 
Ann Haine 
John Dewland 
Elizabeth Dewland 



George Tilley 
Lucy Tilley 
Maria Haskell 
Jane Clench 
Elizabeth Clench 
Lydia Fish 
I number only 8 



Monckton. 

Robert Whaddon 
Mary Whaddon 
Hannah Stacy 
John Ford 
Ann Mearing 
Sarah Butler 
William Clements 
Sarah Clements 
John Coleman 
Elizabeth Coleman 
Harry Barnes 
Charlotte Barnes 
Catherine Williams 
Elizabeth Cook 
Ann Hunt 
Ann Bushell 



Mangwood. 

John Brewer 
William Brewer 
Hannah Roberts 
James Maidment 
John Perry 
William Bundy 
William Mowdy 
Edward Lawes 
William Ford 
Richard Andrews 



Wareham. 

John Stickland 
S. Stickland 
John Roberts 
Elizabeth Roberts 
Samuel Weston 
Mary Weston 

Grange. 

John Milledge 
Mary Milledge 
Thomas Abbott 
Joan Abbott 
David Abbott 
Mary Hibbs 
Mary Hatcherd 
Mary Seamen 
Frances Barnes 
Mary Whiterow 
John Seamen 
William Cure 
Mary Cure 
Mary Smith 
I number only 11 

SWANAGE. 

John Marsh 
Thomas Stickland 
Robert Barnes 
Thomas Coleman 
Robert Alford 
Joseph Phippard 
John Toope 
Robert Hyson 
Anthony Phippan 
Timothy Burt 
Andrew Mintern 
Charles Meader 









APPENDIX 






171 


SWANAGE— dd 


Hester Hyson 


J. Tullage 




Jane Norman 


W. Ayles 


John Phippard 
Henry Bush 
Kobert Warren 


Mary Burt 
Martha Squibb 


Richard Barnes 
Elizabeth Barnes 


Elizabeth Sanders 


Elizabeth Winter 


Kichard Barnes 


Ann Warren 


Grace Attwooll 


James Warren 


Mary Warren 


Mary Hallett 


Sarah Alford 




Benedicta Lewis 


Elizabeth Stickland Weymouth. 


Jane Passhen 


Sarah Briggs 
Ann Phippard 
Ann Meader 


James Sherring 


Mary Angel 
Catherine Languish 


James Keach 


Miss Atkinson 


Elizabeth Burt 


Robert Trim 


Ann Greening 




u 






in 


GO 


«> 05 


CO 

.Z 93 


Extra Coll. 


Kings- 


Yearly 




O o 




O 


c3 


> a 

P a 


•^ a 


forremoving 


wood Col- 


Col- 


Names of Places. 


o a 

Oh 


eC — 1 
P3m 


a 
® 

23 


(D 

P 




bheOldDebt. 


lection. 


lection. 


















£ s. d. 


£ s. d. 


£ s. d. 


Poole 




26 


8 


5 


2 




48 


12 


15 6 


10 


Portland . 




8 


1 


1 


4 




91 


2 14 


18 6 


1 18 


Weymouth 




9 




2 


1 




16 


4 6 


2 2 6 




Grange 


T 




5 








11 


11 


11 6 


10 


Swauage . 




ib 


1 


T 2 




30 


15 


15 6 


10 


Morden, East 


i 


4 


1 


2 


1 




37 


1 11 6 


18 


13 


and West 






















Lytchett . 




i 




... 




* ■ . 


21 


9 


14 


4 6 


Blandford 


1 












10 


1 1 


10 


t , 


Monckton and 




"3 


2 


2 


"i 




26 


2 2 


110 


1 1 


Mangwood 






















Stourpaine 


1 

1 4 




... 








8 






... 


Total 


64 18 

1 


13 


!» 


298 


10 


9 16 6 


5 16 6 



N.B.— Last year, before I knew from Brother Mill ward what 
he got for the Kingswood Collection at Poole, I ventured 
to send to the Conference 15s. in their behalf ; but the 
collection amounting only to 7s., I therefore think it no 
injustice to deduct the 8s. then deficient from the 
Kingswood Collection for this year, so that I consider it 
only £9, 8s. 6d. Er. Truscott. 

July 17 th, 1802. 



172 



APPENDIX 



THE NAMES OF THE SOCIETIES AND MEMBERS 
IN THE POOLE CIRCUIT, 1803. 



Portland. 



Ann Gibbs 
Elizabeth Pearce 
Men's Saturday Night Ann Pearce 

"Mary Hoskins 
Elizabeth Stone 
Jane Raiment 



William Angel 
Thomas Read 
Joseph Motyer 
William Pearce 
Thomas Ayles 
John A. Attwooll 
James Wallis 
William Gibbs 
Thomas Flew 
Robert Hoskins 
William Pearce 
John Stone 

Sunday Afternoon at 
Brother AngeVs. 

Elizabeth Hoff 
Grace Attwooll 
Agnes Attwooll 
Alice Shepherd 
Ann Newman 
Sarah Stone 
Mary Pearce 
Rebecca Ayles 
Ann Mills 
Susannah Spencer 
Mary Angel 
Elizabeth Weakley 

Wakeham Class. 

John Marwood 
Mary Skinner 
Rebecca Skinner 
Tabitha Stevens 



At the Chapel. 

Richard Comben 
William Russell 
Henry Stone 
Samuel Mitchell 
Robert Pearce 
Benjamin Hoff 
Women's Thurs. Class. Richard Bennett 

John Motyer 



Rebekah Green 
Dorothy Allen 
Lucy Stewart 
Rebecca Wallis 
Elizabeth Bess 
Ann Muddle 
Martha Truscott 
Sarah Motyer 
Mary Stone 
Mary Pearce 
Hannah Schollar 



Weston Class. 

Joan Read 
Ann Stevens 
Rebekah Comben 
Mary Comben 

Southwell Class. 

Charles Whittell 
Han. Whittell sen. 
Han. Whittell jun. 
Susannah Wallis 
Sarah Wallis 
Rebekah Comben 



Shadrach Stone 
Peter Vine 
Robert Schollar 

Women's Sat. Night. 

Mary Jacob 
Joan Winter 
Grace Way 
Sarah Wiggatt 
Jane Scoble 
Edith Stone 
Mary Read 
Ann Stone 
Edith Angel 
Lydia Motyer 
Susanna Allen 
Mary Schollar 
Margery Attwooll 
Ebbett Hodgson 
Ann Vine 
Alice Attwooll 
Sarah Allen 

Sunday Afternoon at 
Brother RusselVs. 

Catherine Winter 
Jane Vine 



APPENDIX 



173 



Portland— dd. 

Sunday Afternoon at 
Bro. Russell's — dd. 

Jane Read 
Sarah Wiggatt 
Alice Mitchell 
Nancy Head 
Mary Pearce 
Jane Pearce 
Sarah Pearce 
Catherine Stone 
Agnes Mills 
Mary Dismore 



Poole. 

Sunday Afternoon's. 

James Hickford 
Catherine Hickford 
Jane Read 
Mary Millward 
Jane Hannam 
Ann King 
Mary Woodcock 
John Gray 
Hannah Gray 
Richard Davis 
Ann Millefant 
Elizabeth Burrow 
Mary Braffitt 
Martha Sims 
Mary Bridle 
Mary Jenkins 



Thomas Woodcock 
John N. Frampton 
William Cartridge 
John Knight 
James Dorey 
Elizabeth Scott 
Robert Stickland 
Francis Wheeler 
George Rood 
William Hull 
James King 



Monday's Class. 

Mary King 
Mary Hounsell 
Judith Dyett 
Elizabeth Frampton 
Jane Tullock 
Catherine Daley 
Elizabeth Misher 
Susannah Annas 
Sarah Bird 
Eleanor Woodcock 
Eleanor Brown 
Elizabeth Larcome 
Elizabeth Scott 
Mary Cummins 
Mary Barnes 
Elizabeth Hull 
Hannah Goff 
Susanna Colborne 



Wareham. 



Lytchett. 

Joseph Osmond 
Sarah Osmond 
John Parsons 
Hannah Parsons 
John Dolman 
Sarah Dolman 
Elizabeth Soper 
John Parsons sen. 
Mary Parsons 
Susanna Parkins 
Elizabeth Dyett 
Michael Balam 
Sarah Balam 
Elizabeth Hiscock 
Jane Whaddon 
Elizabeth Foster 
Elizabeth Plowman 
John Reed 
Mary Reed 
Hannah Drake 
Elizabeth Lodge 
Elizabeth Pender 



Stourpaine. 

George Tilley 
Lucy Tilley 
John Dewland 
Elizabeth Dewland 
Thomas Aysten 
Lydia Fish 
Maria Haskell 
Angelica Haskell 



Friday's Class 

Thomas Scott 
Samuel Weston 



John Stickland 
S. Stickland 
John Roberts 
Elizabeth Roberts 



Monckton. 

William Clemens 
Sarah Clemens 



174 



APPENDIX 



MONCKTON — Ctd. 

Harry Barnes 
Charlotte Barnes 
Catherine Williams 
Elizabeth Cook 
Ann Bushel 
Ann Hunt 
Elizabeth Coleman 
Robert Whaddam 
Mary Whaddam 
Hannah Stacy 
John Ford 
Sarah Butler 



Mangwood. 

John Brewer 
Hannah Brewer 
William Brewer 
James Maidment 
Edward Laws 
William Parry 
William Bandy 
William Mowdy 
Samuel James 
Richard Andrews 



Blandford. 

John Reynolds 
Ann M. Baverstock 
Charles Baverstock 
Benj. Baverstock 
John Rolls 
Benj. Rolls 
Catherine Mahone 
Elizabeth Coombs 
Elizabeth Goodwin 



Grange. 

John Milledge 
Mary Milledge 
Thomas Abbott 
Jean Abbott 
David Abbott 
Mary Hibbs 
Mary Whiterow 
Frances Barnes 
Mary Seaman 
Mary Smith 
William Cure 
Mary Cure 
John Seaman 



SWANAGE. 

Sarah Alford 
Elizabeth Stickland 
Sarah Briggs 
Ann Phippard 
Ann Meader 
Elizabeth Toope 
Elizabeth Burt 
Hester Hyson 
Jane Norman 
Mary Burt 
Martha Squibb 
Ann Warren 
Jane Meader 
Mary Warren 
John Marsh 
Thomas Stickland 
Robert Barnes 
Thomas Coleman 
Robert Alford 
Joseph Phippard 
John Toope 
Robert Hyson 
Timothy Burt 



Andrew Minten 
Charles Meader 
John Phippard 
Robert Warren 
Richard Barnes 
James Warren 
James Ellis 
Henry Bush 
Elizabeth Sanders 
William Stokeley 
James Dick 
Amelia Dick 
John Dick 



Morden. 

William Clark 
Martha Clark 
John Baskam 
Christiana Mearin 
William Ings 
Ann Ings 
Lawrence Langdo\ 
Jenny Langdown 
Mary Pike 
Mabel Mearing 
Hannah Hatcherd 
Sarah Scammel 
Mary James 
George Morris 
Elizabeth Morris 
George Munden 
Sarah Munden 
Henry Foster 
William Fry 
James Baker 
Moses Baker 
Thomas Mitchell 
Ann Munden 
Benj. Watts 
Agnes Watts 



APPENDIX 



175 



Morden— dd. 

Benj. Romaine 
John Shepherd 
William Day 
Ann Stroud 
Sarah Stephens 
Ann James 
James Arnold 
Elizabeth Davis 
Elizabeth Mitchell 
John Barnes 
Maria Barnes 
John Butler 
Ann Butler 
Elizabeth Harvey 
Sarah Crumpler 
Maria Slade 



Elizabeth Cox 
Jane Thomas 
Mary Bascomb 
George Laning 
Judith White 

Weymouth. 

James Keech 
Catherine Keech 
John Hudson 
Elizabeth Hudson 
Edward Tullage 
Mary Tullage 
Richard Burt 
Mary Burt 
James Sherren 
Robert Trim 



William Ayles 
Ann Greening 
Grace Attwooll 
Mary Hallett 
Mary Angel 
Jane Pashen 
Elizabeth Winter 
Elizabeth Keil 

Wyke Regis. 

Richard Barnes 
Elizabeth Barnes 
Mary Stevens 
Mary Woolridge 
Sarah Lake 
William Williams 
Mary Hooper 



THE STATE OF THE POOLE CIRCUIT AT 
THE CONFERENCE, 1803. 





GO 


v. 




00 


to 


• 

u 


CO 






Names of Places. 


1-3 

Ut 
P4 






> 


S 
P5 




a> co 

> a 
a 


1-1 22 


Yearly 
Collection. 


Kingswood 
Collection. 


















£ s. d. 


£ s. d. 


Poole 


1 


8 


6 


3 






47 


17 


19 


Portland 




7 




3 


1 


... 94 


2 12 6 


2 6 


Weymouth and 




11 


. . • 


1 


1 


... 25 


5 6 


2 


Wyke 




















Grange 


1 




• • • 




1 


... 


12 


11 


8 


Swauage 




6 


• • • 








36 


13 


8 


Mordeus 


i 


12 


... 


1 


3 


3 


46 


16 6 


17 2 


! Lvtchett 

1 Blandford and 




2 






1 




22 


7 


9 6 


1 


4 


6 








16 


5 6 5 


' Stouqiaiue 


















Monckton and 


• # * 


1 


3 








24 


17 6 14 2 


Maugwood 




















Warehani 

1 


... 


... 


... 


2 


... 


... 


4 


... 


... 


Total 


4 


51 


15 


10 


7 


1 3 


326 


J 7 5 6 


8 14 



176 



APPENDIX 



Remarks. 

There are on the Class papers 326 names at least, but I 
returned no more than 312 to the Conference, because a few 
are on trial, a few do not meet altogether so well as might be 
desired, and I wish my successor to find rather more than 
less than were returned at the Conference. 

Blandford is a wretched place. May the future prospects 
exceed the past ! 

At Grange the work is at a low ebb. 

At Mangwood, if the preachers meet the class themselves, it 
may be well. The other places, with good looking after, will 
do well, I hope, in all respects. 

N.B. — The Preachers are Circuit Stewards here. 



July 29th, 1803. 



F. Truscott. 



A LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS FOR THE 
" MAGAZINE," ETC., 1803. 



Poole, 16. 

Mr. Thos. Woodcock 
Mrs. Tullock 
James Dorey 
Miss Bird 
Mrs. Brown 
Mrs. Millwood 
Mr. Stickland 
Mrs. Johnson 
George Rood 
Mr. Hull 
James King 
Robert Oates 
William Harvey 
Mr. Hitchens 
Mr. Knight 
Mary Hounsell 



Lytchett, 6. 

Mr. Osmond 
John Parsons 
Richard Oliver 
George Maber 
Miss Legg 
Mrs. Pender 



Blandford, 2. 

Mr. C. Baverstock 
Mrs. C. Baverstock 

Monckton, 7. 

Harry Barnes 
Mrs. Williams 
Robert Whaddon 



Mr. Brewer 
Mr. Mowdy 
Samuel James 
James Maidment 

Morden, 13. 

Mrs. White 
Mr. Butler 
Mr. Clarke 
Lawrence Langdown 
Mrs. Bascombe 
William Ings 
George Laning 
George Morris 
David Knapp 
Robert Dominy 
Mrs. Watts 



APPENDIX 



177 



Grange, 7. 

Mr. Abbott 
Mr. John Seaman 
Mr. Milledge 
Mr. Cure 
Mary Seaman 
Mrs. Hooper 
Mr. Snook 



Swan age, 12. 

Mr. Barnes 
Timothy Burt 
Ann Goodchild 
Elizabeth Burt 
Robert Warren 
Sarah Alford 
Mr. Dicks 
Maria Clarke 



Phineas Bower 
Joseph Phippard 
Mr. Collins 
Moses Gillingham 



Weymouth, 11. 



Mr. Barnes 
Mr. Tizzard 
Mr. Sherren 
Mr. Trim 
Mr. Bush ell 
Mr. Powell 
Mr. Greening \ 
Isaiah Bussell J 
Mr. Samways 
Mr. Rolls 
Mr. Jarrat 
Mr. Dimond 
Mr. Norris 



Wareham, 1. 
Mr. John Stiekland 



Portland, 15. 

Mr. Marwood 
Fran. Pearce 
Mr. Gibbs 
Mr. Russell 
William Pearce 
J. A. Attwooll 
Mr. Hoff 
Mr. Motyer 
Mrs. Stewart 
Mary Pearce 
Sarah Wiggatt 
John Motyer 
Susanna Allen 
Edward Pearce 
Thomas Ayles 



For the Magazines, Total 90 Subscribers. 

Subscribers for Dr. Coke's Commentary, 1, Mr. John Rolls 
of Blandford. 

Note. — The last number received was No. 52. 



NAMES OF SOCIETIES AND MEMBERS IN THE 
POOLE CIRCUIT, 1804. 



Grange. 

John Milledge 
Mary Milledge 
Thomas Abbott 
Jane Abbott 
David Abbott 
Mary Hibbs 



Mary Whiterow 
Frances Barnes 
John Seaman 
Mary Seaman 
Mary Smith 
William Cure 
Mary Cure 
Mary Marshfield 



Swanage. 

John Marsh, Lr. 
Robert Barnes 
Thomas Coleman 
Robert Alford 
Joseph Phippard 
John Toope 

12 



178 



APPENDIX 



SWANAGE — Ctd. 

Robert Hayson 
Timothy Burt 
Andrew Men torn 
Charles Meader 
John Phippard 
Robert Warren 
James Warren 
Richard Barnes 
Joseph Ellis 
Henry Bush 
William Stockley 
James Dicks 
John Dicks 
John Clarke 
Thomas Hardy 

Sarah Alford, Lr. 
Sarah Briggs 
Ann Phippard 
Ann Harlock 
Elizabeth Toope 
Elizabeth Burt 
Hester Hayson 
Jane Norman 
Mary Burt 
Martha Squibb 
Ann Warren 
Mary Warren 
Jane Meader 
Elizabeth Sanders 
Amelia Dicks 
Esther Melmouth 
Martha Bower 
Thomas Stickland 
Elizabeth Stickland 



Poole. 

James Hickford, Lr. 
Catherine Hickford 



John Reed 
Ann King 
Mary Millwood 
Jane Hennam 
Mary Woodcock 
Richard Davis 
Ann Millefant 
Mary Barfitt 
Martha Simms 
Hannah Gray 
Sarah Bridle 
Mary Bezant 
Mary Byron 

Thomas Scott, Lr. 
Thomas Woodcock 
John Frampton 
William Cartridge 
John Knight 
James Dorey 
Elizabeth Scott 
Robert Stickland 
WiUiam Hull 

Mary King, Lr. 
Judith Dyett 
Elizabeth Frampton 
Jane Tullock 
Catherine Davey 
Susan Annas 
Sarah Bird 
Eleanor Woodcock 
Eleanor Brown 
Elizabeth Larcombe 
Elizabeth Scott 
Susan Colbourne 
Dorothy Magivick 
Mary Abbott 
Samuel Werton 
Mary Barnes 
Mary Hounsell 
Susan Wheeler 



Stourpaine. 



George Tilley 
Lucy Tilley 
Elizabeth Dobland 
Maria Haskel 
Lydia Fish 
Thomas Easter 
Elizabeth Whicker 
Jane Clench 
James Newman 
Sarah Newman 
Sarah Angeworth 
Thomas Collis 
Elizabeth Collis 



Lytchett. 

Joseph Osmond, Lr. 
Sarah Osmond 
John Parsons 
Hannah Parsons 
Sarah Dolman 
Elizabeth Soper 
John Parsons 
Mary Parsons 
Susan Parkins 
Elizabeth Dyett 
Michael Balam 
Sarah Balam 
Elizabeth Hiscock 
Jane Waddon 
Elizabeth Foster 
Henry Drake 
Elizabeth Plowman 
James Foster 
John Reed 
Mary Reed 
Elizabeth Lodge 



APPENDIX 



179 



Blandford. 

John Reynolds, Lr. 
A. M. Baverstock 
Charles Baverstock 
Benj. Baverstock 
Benj. Rolls 
John Rolls 
Catherine Mahone 
Elizabeth Coombes 
Elizabeth Godwin 
Ann Greening 



Monckton. 

Wm. Clemens, Lr. 
Sarah Clemens 
Harry Barnes 
Charlotte Barnes 
Catherine Williams 
James Maidment 
Elizabeth Maidment 
Ann Bushell 
Elizabeth Coleman 
Robert Wadham 
Mary Wadham 
Hannah Stacy 
John Ford 
Sarah Butler 



Mangwood. 

John Brewer 
Hannah Brewer 
William Brewer 
James Maidment 
Edward Lawes 
William Perry 
William Bundy 
William Mowdy 



Samuel James 
Richard Andrews 

Mobden. 

John Barnes, Lr. 
Maria Barnes 
John Butler 
Ann Butler 
Sarah Crumpler 
Mary Slade 
Elizabeth Cox 
Jane Thomas 
Mary Bascomb 
George Lanam 
Judith White 
Thomas Everett 
Edward Cox 
Benj. Watts 
Agnes Watts 
Ann Stroud 
James Arnold 
Thomas Mitchell 
Elizabeth Mitchell 
John Shepherd 
William Day 
Benj. Romaine 
William Fry 
Ann James 
Sarah Stevens 
John Stickland 
John Romaine 

William Clarke, Lr, 
Martha Clarke 
John Bascombe 
Christ. Mearing 
William Ings 
Ann Ings 
Jane Langdown 
Mary Pike 
Hannah Hatcherd 



Elizabeth Seller 
George Morris 
Betty Morris 
George Munden 
Sarah Munden 
Ann Munden 
Harry Foster 
James Baker 
Moses Baker 
John Baker 
Jane Christopher 



Wyke. 

Eliz. Barnes, Lr. 
Richard Barnes 
Sarah Lake 
Mary Wallage 
Mary Stephens 
William Williams 
James Lake 
Elizabeth Bunt 



Weymouth. 

James Sherren, Lr. 
James Keech 
Kath. Keech 
William Ayles 
John Hudson 
Jane Hudson 
Richard Bunt 
Grace Attwooll 
Ann Bunt 
Elizabeth Winter 
Jane Passhen 
Mary Hallett 
Mary Angel 
Mary Tullage 
Edward Tullage 



i8o 



APPENDIX 



Weymouth — dd. 

Ann Mack 
John Cocks 
Henry Shadcott 



Portland. 

William Russell, Lr. 
Elizabeth Hoff 
Grace Attwooll 
Alice Shepherd 
Agnes Attwooll 
Sarah Stone 
Mary Pearce 
Rebecca Ayles 
Ann Mills 
Susan Spencer 
Ann Vine 
Sarah Motyer 

William Russell's 
2nd Class. 

Jane Vine 
Sarah Wiggatt 
Alice Mitchell 
Nancy Read 
Mary Pearce 
Jane Pearce 
Sarah Pearce 
Catherine Stone 
Elizabeth Weakley 
Catherine Winter 

William Angel, Lr. 
Thomas Read 



Joseph Motyer 
Thomas Ayles 
J. A. Attwooll 
James Wallis 
William Gibbs 
Thomas Flew 
Robert Hoskins 
"William Pearce 
John Stone 
Francis Pearce 
John Andrews 

Chas. Whittell, Lr. 
Hannah Whittell 
Hannah Whittell 

jun. 
Sarah Wallis 
Reb. Comben jun. 

John Mar wood, Lr. 
Mary Skinner 
Tabitha Stevens 
Rebecca Stevens 
Ann Gibbs 
Elizabeth Pearce 
Ann Pearce 
Mary Hoskins 
Elizabeth Stone 
Jane Raiment 
Mary Comben 
Sarah Wallis 
Joan Read 
Rebecca Comben 
Ann Stevens 

William Pearce, Lr. 
Rebecca Green 
Dorothy Allen 



Lucy Steward 
Rebecca Wallis 
Elizabeth Bess 
Mary Stone 
Elizabeth Algar 
Mary Pearce 
Jane Hellyer 

Richard Comben, Lr. 
Henry Stone 
Samuel Mitchell 
Benj. Hoff 
Richard Bennett 
Robert Scholar 
John Motyer 
Robert Pearce 
Peter Vine 
Shadrach Stone 

Richard Comben's 
2nd Class. 

Mary Jacob 
Grace Way 
Joan Winter 
Sarah Wiggatt 
Jane Comben 
Edith Stone 
Mary Read 
Ann Stone 
Edith Angel 
Susan Allen 
Lydia Motyer 
Mary Scholar 
Margery Attwooll 
Sarah Allen 
Ebbett Hodgson 
Alice Attwooll 
Agnes Mills 



APPENDIX 



181 



THE STATE OF THE POOLE CIRCUIT AT THE 
CONFERENCE, 1804. 



] 

Names of Societies. 

i 
i 


=3 « 

v s: 
o - 

u 
1 

1 

"l 
"2 

1 


m 


• 7! 

oj "O 

^ to 


73 

«— < 

> 
O 

a 


CO 

JS 

el 
<t 

Q 


so 

. B 

fl O 

o'S 


DQ 

■z s 


Yearly 

Col- 
lection. 


Kings- 
wood Col- 
lection. 


Mission- 
ary Col- 
lection. 


1 Poole 
Portland . 
Weymouth and 
Wyke 
1 Grange 
Swanage 
Morden 
Lytchett . 
Bland ford and 

Stourpaine 
Monckton and 

Mangwood 
Wareham 


"4 

2 
6 

1 


"2 

i 


1 
2 


1 
1 

T 
1' 


1 

2 


42 
94 
29 

14 
40 
47 
21 
18 

24 

2 


£ s. d. 
14 3 
2 16 6 
10 6 

10 
14 
7 8 
4 3 

4 6 


£ s. d. 
16 
13 
2 6 6 

8 6 
10 
13 3 
7 6 
5 2 

12 1 


£ s. d. 


Total 


6 


13 


3 


4 


4 


3 


331 


7 1 8 


7 2 


7 



A LIST OF THE SUBSCRIBERS FOR "MAGAZINES" 

FOR 1804. 



Poole, 11. 

Miss Bird 

Mrs. Tullock 

Mr. Hawke by Mr. 

Woodcock 
Mr si. Millwood 
Mr. Stickland 
Mr. Blandford 
Mr. Jos. Shepherd 
Mr. Knight 
Miss Sally Clarke 
Aim Mellifont 
Mr. Scott 



Wareham, 2. 

Mr. Stickland 
Mr. Roberts 

Lytchett, 7. 

Mr. Osmond 
Mr. Parsons 
Mr. Maber 
Mr. Oliver 
Mr. Hiscock 
Mr. Plowman 
Mr. Clench 



Blandford, 5. 

Mrs. Greening 
Mr. Baverstock 
Mr. Chas. Baverstock 
Mr. John Rolls 
Mr. John Reynolds 

Swanage, 15. 

Mr. Alford 
Mr. Barnes 
Mr. Burt 
Elizabeth Burt 



l82 



APPENDIX 



SWANAGE — Ctd. 

Mr. Dicks 
Phineas Bower 
Joseph Phippard 
Mr. Collins 
James Warren 
Charles Meader 
Mr. Tivitoe 
Henry Hibbs 
Elizabeth Harding 
Mr. Millmer 
Mr. John Ellis 



Morden, 13. 

Mr. Butler 
Mr. Edward Cox 
Mr. Romaine 
Mrs. Bascombe 
Mr. William Ings 
Mr George Lanham 
Mr. George Morris 
Mr. Robert Dominy 
Mr. Mearing 
Mr. J. Sheppard 
Mr. J Baker 
Mr. Clark 
Mrs. Watts 



Portland, 18. 

Mr. Marwood 
Mr. Gibbs 
Mr. Russell 
Mr. J. Wm. Pearce 
Mr. A. Attwooli 
Mr. Hoff 
Mr. Motyer 
Mary Pearce 
Sally Wiggatt 
Mr. Ed. Pearce 
Mr. Thomas Ayles 
Edith Stone 
Mrs. Hellyer 
Mr. Hodgson 
Mr. F. Pearce 
Miss Susan Allen 
Miss Susan Allen, 

2nd set 
Mr. John Motyer 

Weymouth, 13. 

Mr. Tizard 
Mrs. Starling 
Mrs. Dearing 
Mr. Dymond 
Mr. Keech 
Mr. Ayles 
Miss Arnold 



Mrs. Barnes 
Mr. Jerrard 
Mr. Powell 
Mr. Norris 
Mr. Bussell 
Mr. Clark 

MONCKTON, &C, 11. 

Harry Barnes 
Mrs. Williams 
Robert Whaddon 
Mr. Brewer 
Mr. Mowdey 
Samuel James 
James Maidment 
Mr. Clemens 
Mr. Carter 
Mr. Cutler 
Mr. Gillingham 

Grange, 7. 

Mr. Abbott 
Mr. Seyman 
Mr. Milledge 
Mr. Cure 
Mary Seyman 
Mrs. Hooper 
Mr. Snook 



Total Number of Magazines. 



Poole 11 

Lytchett 7 

Blandford . 5 

Monckton and Mangwood 1 1 

Morden 13 

Wareham 2 



Swanage 
Grange . 
Portland 
Weymouth 



15 

7 
18 
13 



102 



Mr. Rolls of Blandford subscribed for Dr. Coke's Notes, 
and had all that are published. Mr. Brewer of Wickington 
hath had the first twenty-four numbers of Coke's Commentary. 
The rest must be got for him from London. 



APPENDIX 



183 



NAMES OF SUBSCRIBERS FOR "MAGAZINE," 1805. 



Portland, 20. 

Mr. Marwood 

Mr. Gibbs 

Mr. Russell 

Mr. Wni. Pearce 

Mr. John Attwooll 

Mr. Hoff 

Mr. Motyer 

Mr. John Motyer 

Mr. Ed. Attwooll 

Mrs. Flew 

Mr. William Peters 

Mr. Thomas Ayles 

Mrs. Edith Stone 

Mrs. Hillyer 

Mr. F. Pearce 

Mr. Abel Comben 

Miss Susan Allen 

Mrs. Allen 

Mr. Ed. Whittle 



Grange, 11. 

Mr. John Dunning 
Mr. John Milledge 
Mr. Henry Stevens 
Mr. Rubert Locus 
Mrs. M. Marshfield 
Mr. John Bulson 
Elizabeth Richards 
Mr. Thomas Abbott 
Mrs. Francis Barnes 
Mr. William Cure 
Mr. Wm. Seaman 

Wkymoutit, 13. 

Mr. Tizard 
Mrs. Feal 



Mr. Dymond 
Mr. Ayles 
Mrs. Barnes 
Mr. Norris 
Mr. Bussell 
Mr. Clarke 
Mr. R. Languish 
Mr. Bunt 
Elizabeth Ceale 
Mr. Tulledge 
Mr. Samways 



Morden, 14. 

Mr. Butler 
Mr. Clarke 
Mr. Ed. Cox 
Mr. Romaine 
Mrs. Bascombe 
Mr. William Ings 
Mr. George Lanham 
Mr. George Morris 
Mr. Robert Dominy 
Mr. Mearing 
Mr. J. Shepherd 
Mr. J. Baker 
Mrs. Watts 

One more 



Swanage, 24. 

Mr. Timothy Collins 

Sally Moulin 

Mary Short 

James Picks 

Mr. John Saunders 

Mrs. Bore 

Mr. Thomas Hardy 



Hester Melmouth 
Ann Collins 
Mr. Henry Brown 
Ann Curtis 
Mr. Jas. Stickland 
Mr. John Phippard 
Mr. James Marsh 
Susanna Brown 



Wareham, 2. 

Mr. Stickland 
Mr. Roberts 



Poole, 15. 

Mrs. Tullock 
Mr. Hawke, 2 copies 
Mrs. Millwood 
Miss Danning 
Mr. Hatchard 
Mr. Bland ford 
Mr. John Shepherd 
Mr. John Binstead 
Mr. Knight 
Miss S. Clarke 
Mr. Grey 
Ann Mellifont 
Mrs. Browne 
Mr. Scott 
Mr. Frampton 



Lytchett, 14. 

Mr. Osmond 
Mr. Parsons 
Mr. Maber 



1 84 


APPENDIX 




Lytchett— ctd. 


Mr. John Read 


Mr. Chas. Baverstock 




Mr. Bartlett 


Mr. John Rolls 


Mr. Oliver 


Mr. James Hiscock 




Mr. Hiscock 


Mr. French 




Mr. Blowman 




Monckton, 3. 


Mr. Clench 

Mr. Robert Clench 


Blandford, 4. 


Mrs. Williams 


Mr. James Foster 


Mrs. Greening 


Mrs. Carter 


Mr. James Blake 


Mr. Baverstock 


Robert Whaddon 


Portland 


20 


Poole 


15 


Weymouth 


13 


Lytchett 


14 


Grange 


11 


Blandford 4 


Swanage 


24 


Monckton 3 


Morden 

\^/ a ■*-* ft V~\ f\ V\^ 


14 

9 




120 


w arenam 


L 





NAMES OF SUBSCRIBERS FOR "MAGAZINES," 
WEYMOUTH CIRCUIT, 1806. 



Portland, 19. 

Mr. Marwood 
Mr. Gibbs 
Mr. Flew 
Mrs. Hillyer 
Mrs. Allen 
Susan Bennett 
Mrs. Stone 
Mr. Wm. Pearce 
Mr. Attwooll 
Mr. Motyer 
Mr. A. Mills 
Mr. Abel Comben 
Miss Susan Allen 
Mrs. Green 
Mrs. Elizabeth Pitt 
Mr. F. Pearce 
Mrs. Weakley 



Mrs. Susannah Pitt 
Miss Susan Allen 

Grange, 9. 

Mr. Abbott senior 
Miss Abbott 
Mr. Milledge 
Mrs. Barnes 
Mr. Dunning 
Mary Marshfield 
Thomas Coleman 
John Balsom 
Joseph Millar 

Swanage, 25. 

Howard Collins 
Ann Collins 



Henry Hibbs 
Lucy Smith 
Ann Curtis 
Mary Short 
Elizabeth Toope 
Hester Dowden 
Mary Herlock 
Ann Talbot 
Sarah Smith 
William Phippard 
Hester Melmouth 
Joseph Ellis 
Phineas Turner 
John Phippard 
Robert Barnes 
Timothy Burt 
Sarah Bower 
Mary Short 
Elizabeth Barnes 



APPENDIX 



185 



SWANAGE — Ctd. 

Hannah Mowlem 
John Ellis 
William Stockley 
Charlotte Emonds 
Anthony Phippard 



Moncktox, 3. 

Mrs. "Williams 
Mary Carter 
Robert Whadden 



Poole, 32. 

Harriet Adams 
Mary King 
Marv Legge 
Mrs." Tullock 
Nancy Laws 
Mrs. Hatchard 
Sallv Annis 
T. Poyel 
Mr. Hawke 
Mr. Hawke 
Mr. Hawke 
Mr. Hawke 
Mr. Hatchard 
Elizabeth Scott 
Richard Darwin 
Mrs. Millwood 
Mr. Silby 
Mrs. Johnson 
Mrs Brown 
Mr. Hull 



Sarah Bridle 
Mr. Etheridge 
Mrs. Singer 
Mrs. Hayward 
Mrs. Brewer 
Mr. Blandford 
Mrs. Davidge 
Mrs. Greening 
E. C. Eylos 
Mr. Heckford 
Mrs. Clarke 
Mr. Dunning 



Lytchett, 11. 

Mr. Osmond 
Mr. Parsons 
Mr. Maber 
Mr. Colliss 
Mr. Hiscock 
Mr. Foster 
Mr. Bartlett 
Mr. Brown 
Mr. Dolman 
Mr. Blake 
Mr. Smith 



Morden, 16. 

Mr. Butler 
William Clarke 
John Mearing 
Mary Baskham 
Henry Foster 
Robert Dominy 
John Baker 



Thomas Baker 
Ed. Cox 
George Banning 
Benj. Romaine 
Thomas Mitchell 
James Wilcox 
Mrs. Watts 
Mr. Cheeseman 
Mrs. Cousens 



Weymouth, 19. 

Captain Bennett 
Captain Quick 
Mr. Samways 
Mr. Dymond 
Mr. Norris 
Mr. Rolls 
Miss Greaves 
Miss Keech 
Miss Pashen 
Mr. Sherren 
Mrs. Starling 
Mr. Gray 
Mr. Tulledge 
Mrs. Barnes 
Mrs. Winter 
Mrs. White 
Mr. Taylor 
Mr. Bussell 
Mr. Clarke 



Blandford, 2. 

Mrs. Baverstock 
Mr. John Rolls 



Benjamin Plowman wants the sett now at Poole. 



1 86 



APPENDIX 



NAMES OF PERSONS IN THE WEYMOUTH 
CIRCUIT, June 1806. 



Weymouth. 

Preacher's Class. 

Ann Wintle 
Elizabeth Bunt 
James Mabey 
John Hodgson 
John Cox 
John Sherren 
Ed. Tulledge 
Henry Dymond 
Richard Bunt 
John Mabey 
Henry Baker 
William Ayles 
Wm. Rodison \ w 
William Bates & 
Ed. Dean KS 

Thomas Flird 
George PriestlyJ 



o 

02 



Sister Greave's Class. 

Mary Greaves 
Mary Tulledge 
Ann Bunt 
Grace Attwooll 
Elizabeth Winter 
Mary Hallett 
Ann Mackey 
Harriet Keach 
Ann Bunt junior 
Sarah Stirling 
Mary Sherren 
Elizabeth Keill 
Jane Parken 
Maria Harrison 
James Plowman 
Ann Cox 



Wyke Class. 

Eliz. Barnes, Lr. 
Richard Barnes 
James Lake 
Thomas Hardy 
Mary Powell 
Mary Stevens 
Sarah Lake 
Mary A. Hardy 

Portland. 

William Angel, Lr. 
Jane Vine 
Sarah Wiggatt 
Nancy Read 
Mary Pearce 
Sarah Pearce 
Catherine Stone 
Alice Mitchell 
Elizabeth Weakley 
Catherine Winter 
Ann Stone 
Edith Stone 
Jane Pearce 

William Pearce, Lr. 
Rebecca Green 
Dorothy Allen 
Rebecca Wallis 
Elizabeth Bess 
Mary Henshaw 
Mary Stone 
Mary Flew 
Jane Hillyer 

Richard Comben, Lr, 
Jane Winter 



Sarah Gibbs 
Mary Attwooll 
Edith Angel 
Susanna Allen 
Lydia Motyer 
Mary Scholar 
Sarah Allen 
Alice Attwooll 
Mary Bennett 
Mary Bennett 
Susanna Bennett 
Elizabeth Weakley 

James Wallis, Lr. 
Thomas Read 
Joseph Motyer 
John Ayles 
William Gibbs 
Thomas Flew 
Robert Hoskins 
William Pearce 
John Andrews 
Abraham Mills 
John Stone 
Francis Pearce 

William Russell, Lr. 
Elizabeth Hoff 
Grace Attwooll 
Alice Shepherd 
Agnes Attwooll 
Sarah Stone 
Mary Pearce 
Rebecca Ayles 
Ann Mills 
Susan Spencer 
Ann Vine 
. Sarah Motyer 
Mary Jacob 



APPENDIX 



187 



Portland — ctd. 

Margaret Attwooll 
Grace Way- 
Mary Angel 
Jane Comben. 

Chas. Whittle, Lr. 
Hannah Whittle 
Han. Whittle jun. 
Sarah Wallis 
Elizabeth Anthony 
Rebecca Comben 

John Marwood, Lr. 
Mary Skinner 
Tabitha Stevens 
Rebecca Skinner 
Ann Gibbs 
Elizabeth Pearce 
Ann Pearce 
Mary Hoskins 
Elizabeth Stone 
Jane Wallis 
Joan Read 
Rebecca Comben 
Ann Stevens 
Mary Comben 
Sarah Wallis 

Richard Comben' '$ 
2nd Class. 
Henry Stone 
Samuel Mitchell 
Richard Bennett 
John Motyer 
Robert Pearce 
Peter Vine 

Lulworth. 

John Williams, Lr. 
Elizabeth Williams 



William Barnes 
Ann Pitt 
Marv Barnes 
Elizabeth Harwell 
Jane Williams 
Mary Samways 
Ann Tewkesbury 
Elizabeth Williams 

Grange. 

John Milledge 
Sarah Abbott 
Mary Seaman 
Mary Milledge 
Mary Cure 
Frances Barnes 
Mary Hibbs 
Mary Whiterow 
Mary Stickland 
Mary Smith 
Mary Marshfield 
Sally Dunning 

John Balsom, Lr. 
John Seaman 
Thomas Abbott 
David Abbott 
Matthew Abbott 
William Cure 
Thomas Cockman 
Joseph Millar 
William Hatchett 
Richard Stickland 
Elizabeth Stickland 
John Dunning 
William Milledge 

Swanage. 

Sarah Alford, Lr. 
Elizabeth Burt 



Sarah Briggs 
Ann Phippard 
Elizabeth Toope 
Hester Hayson 
Jane Norman 
Mary Burt 
Martha Squibb 
Ann Warren 
Jane Meader 
Hester Melmouth 
Martha Bower 
Elizabeth Stickland 
Sarah Collins 
Hannah Moulin 
Ann Curtis 
Sarah Bonfield 
Ann Collins 
Mary Herlock 
Susanna Brown 
Susan Pushman 
Sarah Wicks 
Elizabeth Collins 
Charlotte Edmonds 
Hester Talbot 
Mary Hancock 
Elizabeth Coleman 
Biney Bush 
Ann Herlock 
Maria White 
Sarah Short 
Elizabeth Goodchild 
Thomas Coleman 
John Marsh 
Robert Alford 
Robert Barnes 
Joseph Phippard 
John Tape 
Robert Haysom 
Timothy Burt 
Andrew Mertem 
Charles Meader 
John Phippard 



i88 



APPENDIX 



SWANAGE — dd. 

Robert Warren 
Joseph Ellis 
Henry Bush 
William Stockley 
Peter Pushman 
Thomas Lingington 
John Clarke 
Thomas Hardy 
Thomas Stickland 
William Turner 
Robert Edmonds 
James Read 
John Read 
William Herlock 
Robert Saunders 



Langton Class. 

James Dicks 
Amelia Dicks 
John Dicks 
Lucy Smith 
John Bower 
Margaret Bower 
James Saunders 
Elizabeth Saunders 
Henry Talbot 
Elizabeth Talbot 
Ann Talbot 
Sarah Talbot 
Elizabeth Bower 

Worth. 

Jane Turner 
Sarah Bower 
Keziah Bower 
Sarah Smith 
Mary Kimber 
Betty Barnes 
Phineas Turner 



Hannah Dunning 
Martha Bower 
Margaret Bower 
Hannah Bower 
Sarah Corben 
Tabitha Baggs 

Wareham. 

John Stickland 
Hannah Stickland 
Mary Pike 
Ann Hobbs 
William Warren 
Elizabeth Hatchard 

Poole. 

Samuel Weston, Lr. 
Thomas Woodcock 
John Knight 
Joseph Paine 
William Hull 
Mary Legge 
Robert Tapper 
William Cartridge 
John Saunders 
James Mupper 
Aaron Janot 
Thomas Byron 
Benj. French 
Richard Bolt 
William Scott 

Thomas Scott, Lr. 
Elizabeth Scott sen. 
Mary Hounsell 
Eleanor Brown 
Mary Abbott 
Elizabeth Woodcock 
Catherine Daley 
Elizabeth Johnson 
Elizabeth Scott 



Hannah Grey 
Sarah Annes 
Hannah Hatchard 
Ann Warren 
Elizabeth Mowland 
Ann Laws 
Mary Davidge 
Hannah Florence 
Salley Brewer 
Sarah Stickland 
Elizabeth Janot 
Mary Warren 
Ann Bridle 
Laddy Braffit 
Harriet Adams 
Sarah Jarrett 
Elizabeth Clench 
James Heckford 
Catherine Heckford 
Ann King 
Mary Millwood 
Mary Woodcock 
Martha Symes 
Sarah Bridle 
Amelia Byron 
Jane Tullock 
John Read 
Richard Davis 
Mary Besant 
Peter Hawke 
Richard Davvon 

MORDEN. 

John Barnes, Lr. 
Maria Barnes 
John Butler 
Ann Butler 
Elizabeth Cox 
Jane Thomas 
Mary Bascombe 
George Langing 
Judith White 



APPENDIX 



189 



Morden — dd. 

Edward Cox 
Jane Gallop 
Robert Dashwood 
William Clarke, Lr. 
Martha Clarke 
John Baskhain 
Christiana Mearing 
William Ings 
Ann Ings 
Jane Langdown 
Elizabeth Seller 
George Morris 
Elizabeth Morris 
George Munden 
Sarah Munden 
Henry Foster 
Moses Baker 
John Baker 
Ann Munden 
John Langdown 



Bio j. worth Class. 

Benjamin Watts, Lr 
Agnes Watts 
Ann Stroud 
Thomas Mitchell 
William Fry 
Ann James 
James Wilcock 
William Pitman 
James Arnold 
Sarah Stephen 
William Day 
Dorothy Day 
John Stickland 



Benj. Roniaine 
John Rawles 
Elizabeth Mitchell 

Lytchett. 

Jos. Osmond, Lr. 
Sarah Osmond 
John Parsons 
Hannah Parsons 
John Dolman 
Sarah Dolman 
John Parsons 
Mary Parsons 
Elizabeth Dyett 
Elizabeth Hiscock 
Jane Wadden 
Elizabeth Foster 
Hannah Drake 
Eliz. Ploughman 
James Foster 
John Read 
Mary Read 
Elizabeth Lodge 
Lucy Warren 
John Boyland 
Mary Boyland 
John Bartlett 
Thomas Brown 
Philip Osmond 
Thomas Colliss 
Elizabeth Colliss 
Ann Sweetapple 
Elizabeth Rolls 
Martha Hiscock 
John Derryman 
Mary Laws 
Mary Derryman 
Letty Laws 



Stourpaine. 
Thomas Ester, Lr. 
George Tilley 
Lucy Tilley 
James New 
Sarah New 
Betty Dewland 
Betty Whichard 
Jane Harlock 
Jane Clench 
Sarah Ainsworth 
Benj. Best 
Betty Upward 
Betty Blanch ard 

Monckton. 

William Clements 
Sarah Clements 
Jane Clements 
Mary Waddon 
Henry Barnes 
Elizabeth Coleman 
James Maidment 
Elizabeth Maidment 
Catherine Williams 
Ann Bushell 

Blandford. 

John Reynolds, Lr. 
John Rolls 
Ann Rolls 
A. M. Baverstock 
Ben. Baverstock 
Ann Greening 
Robert Miller 
John Milledge 
— Milledge 
Thomas Scott 



422 in the whole. 
I send 410 to the Conference — as many are new members. I 
found 45 less than Mr. Algar had left names. 



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